UTAH = SELLERS

HARRISON CO, IA

STEVEN'S PAGE

SANDY'S PAGE

KARMA'S PAGE  Utah County



1880 UTAH SOUNDEX
JOSEPH SELLERS 10, IA, UTAH CO, SPRINGVILLE PCT,
STEPSON OF GEO MASON
(original census would show all members living in family)

 1880 Census Place: 20th Ward, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
 Source: FHL Film 1255337  National Archives Film T9-1337     Page 168D
 Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
Elizabeth SELLERS Self F W W 73 SCOT
 Occ: At Home Fa: SCOT Mo: SCOT

 Census Place: Tinpanogus, Wasatch, Utah
 Source: FHL Film 1255339  National Archives Film T9-1339     Page 327B
 Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
Archie SELLERS Self M M W 37 SCOT
 Occ: Farmer Fa: SCOT Mo: SCOT
Elizabett SELLERS Wife F M W 25 UT
 Occ: Keeping House Fa: NY Mo: NY
John J. SELLERS Son M S W 2 UT
   Fa: SCOT Mo: UT
Archebell SELLERS Son M S W 4M UT
   Fa: SCOT Mo: UT
James STEEN Other M S W 45 IL
 Occ: Laborer Fa: SCOT Mo: SCOT

 Census Place: Central, Sevier, Utah
 Source: FHL Film 1255338  National Archives Film T9-1338     Page 474D
 Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
James W. SELLERS Self M M W 35 SCOTLAND
 Occ: Quarryman Fa: SCOT Mo: SCOT
Christine SELLERS Wife F M W 34 DENMARK
 Occ: Keeping House Fa: DEN Mo: DEN
Julia A. SELLERS Dau F S W 11 UT
 Occ: At Home Fa: SCOT Mo: DEN
Elizabeth SELLERS Dau F S W 9 UT
   Fa: SCOT Mo: DEN
James SELLERS Son M S W 7 UT (1873)
   Fa: SCOT Mo: DEN
Christine SELLERS Dau F S W 5 UT
   Fa: SCOT Mo: DEN
Eunice SELLERS Dau F S W 1 UT
   Fa: SCOT Mo: DEN

 Census Place: 11th Ward, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
 Source: FHL Film 1255337  National Archives Film T9-1337     Page 213B
 Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
William SELLERS Self M M W 31 SCOT
 Occ: Sawyer In Sawmill Fa: SCOT Mo: SCOT
Euphima SELLERS Wife F M W 33 SCOT
 Occ: House Keeper Fa: SCOT Mo: SCOT
Albert SELLERS Son M S W 11 UT
   Fa: SCOT Mo: SCOT
Willie SELLERS Son M S W 7 UT
   Fa: SCOT Mo: SCOT
Jane SELLERS Dau F S W 6 UT
   Fa: SCOT Mo: SCOT
James SELLERS Son M S W 3 UT (1877)
   Fa: SCOT Mo: SCOT
Thomas SELLERS Son M S W 1 UT
   Fa: SCOT Mo: SCOT

 Census Place: South Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah
 Source: FHL Film 1255337  National Archives Film T9-1337     Page 292D
 Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
Brigham SELLERS Self M M W 27 SCO
 Occ: Farmer Fa: SCO Mo: SCO
Delila SELLERS Wife F M W 22 UT
 Occ: Keeping House Fa: KY Mo: KY
Brigham SELLERS Son M S W 4 UT
   Fa: SCO Mo: UT
Effy SELLERS Dau F S W 2 UT
   Fa: SCO Mo: UT



1900 UTAH

==

Scofield, Utah Pleasant Valley Mine Disaster May 1900 - updated

http://www.gendisasters.com/data1/ut/explosions/scofield-mineexp1900.htm

Surnames: Adamson, Anderson, Beattie, Beddow, Boneter, Boweter, Burns,
Coclett, Coulthard, Davis, Dixon, Dougal, Dougall, Edwards, Evans, Ferrish,
Gatherman, Howe, Hunter, Jachetta, James, Jones, Kirkton, Kroskie,
Langstaff, Lappi, Liveray, Livesay, Lloyd, Loxon, May, Miller, Muhr,
Padfield, Parmley, Price, Reese, Reilley, Samuels, Sellers, Taylor, Thomas,
Wallace, Webber, Williams, Wilson, Willstead

=============

           Sellersgen@aol.com

I will volunteer to transcribe Sellers for Colorado, Wyoming, Nevada, Utah,
and Idaho 1900 census if it will help.
Frank Sellers

=

1910 UTAH


From:WHO'S WHO'S IN THE WEST
        "Sue Koller" <sue@kaiconsulting.com>

James Clark Sellers-occupation: examiner of questioned documents
(handwriting expert) b. Herber, Utah, Oct. 16, 1891, son of: Archibald
and Elizabeth (Buys) Sellers.



1880
 Census Place: Tinpanogus, Wasatch, Utah
 Source: FHL Film 1255339  National Archives Film T9-1339     Page 327B
 Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
Archie SELLERS Self M M W 37 SCOT
 Occ: Farmer Fa: SCOT Mo: SCOT
Elizabett SELLERS Wife F M W 25 UT
 Occ: Keeping House Fa: NY Mo: NY
John J. SELLERS Son M S W 2 UT
   Fa: SCOT Mo: UT
Archebell SELLERS Son M S W 4M UT
   Fa: SCOT Mo: UT
James STEEN Other M S W 45 IL
 Occ: Laborer Fa: SCOT Mo: SCOT

 Obituary Scapbook
 Leonora D. Cummings.

 Mrs. Cummings was born here Dec. 18. 1862, daughter of Robert S. and Anna R. Young
 Duke. She was married May 7. 1890 to Mr. Cummings in the Logan Temple. They had
 nine children. six of whom survive; Mrs. Jetta Austin, Lehi; Wade Cummings, Mrs. Saddie
 Mael. Mrs. Nellie Baum and Mrs. Grace Dickson, Heber City; Mrs. Birdie Green,
 American Fork; also seven step-children; John G., Joseph, Harmon, Alma and Lyman
 Cummings, and Mrs. Mae Lloyd, all of Heber City, and Mrs. Myrtle Austin, Lehi; 17
 grandchildren and the following brothers and sisters: A. Y. Duke, L. B. Duke, Mrs, Matilda
 Smith, Heber City, and Mrs. Martha Jane Ruker, Idaho; also by the following half brothers
 and sisters; Mrs. Mary Ann Dayton, Mrs. Betsey Anderson, and Mrs. Katie Hoover,
 Provo; Mrs. Delia Richins. Price; Mrs. Emily Sellers, Lyman and Robert Duke, Heber City.
 

 Obituary Scapbook
 Eunice Worthen Butcher

 Surviving are four sons, George W., Bert R. and Ray O. Butcher of Salt Lake City; Isaac
 Butcher of Los Angeles; two daughters, Mrs. Elizabeth McIntyre and Mrs. Ellen Kemp of
 Salt Lake City; 34 grandchildren. 13 great-grandchildren; a brother, Joseph Worthen of
 Blackfoot, Idaho; four sisters, Mrs. Ann Hughes of Ogden; Mrs. Dee Sellers of Menan,
 Idaho; Mrs. Roxana Burt of Arco, Idaho, and Mrs. Tene Larsen of Provo.
 

 Obituary Scapbook
 50 Years

 They are the parents of five daughters, Mrs. Ed Burris, Mrs. C. E. Parry, Mrs. Murtice E.
 Johnson, Mrs. W. D. Ray and Mrs. Gladmore B. Sellers, and two sons, Joseph H. Davis
 Jr. and H. C. Davis, all of Salt Lake City.
 

 Obituary Scapbook
 Death Takes F. H. Snow. 81

 Surviving Mr. Snow are the following children: Franklin R. Snow, an employe of the Salt
 Lake Tribune Telegram; Mrs. Au Rilla S. Sellers, Ruth and Leona Snow of Salt Lake and
 Caroline S. Miller of Los Angeles; the following grandchildren: Billie and Earl Snow Sellers
 of Salt Lake and Alfred and Paul Miller of Los Angeles, and the following brothers and
 sisters: 


                        From:
             HJZM01A@prodigy.com ( SHERRY MAZZETTI)
   Marie and others,
     While looking for Osborn/McDaniel clues, I found an interesting
website.  It is for the John Hamilton Morgan, Manuscripts Division of
Special Collections, University of Utah Marriott Library, Salt Lake
City, Utah (dated 1994).  Accession #1465, a group of photos (many
reproductions) of the Morgan family/reference to early Mormon days in
Utah.  There is a photo of a Lucy Osborn McDaniel (probably cannot be
Mack's daughter, as she reportedly died before photography was
invented, but I'm going to check it out).  There is also a Mrs. Pink
McDaniel whoever that might be.

More to the Sellers point, there are photos of the following, if
anyone knows them:
Mary Ellen Sellers
Sellers' family portrait
Daniel R. Sellers
Daniel R. Sellers and family
Victoria Frances Sellers Kirtland and family, 1877
Mr. and Mrs. Sellers
     The website is http://www.lib.utah.edu/spc/photo/reg/p605.prg
     Hope I've typed this correctly.  Anyone know any of the people
listed?
SHERRY


 Our Pioneer Heritage
 Volume 2
 Down Memory Lane
 A Pioneer Mother
 A Tribute

 After baby Charles was born, Mother rented a small room in Philadelphia. Then came the
 yearning for her children. What was she to do? Mr. Sellars offered the only solution that he
 saw possible. Feeling sure that Mother would see the wisdom of his decision, he had had
 papers made out "binding out" the older children of the family until they should become of
 age, and brought the papers to Mother to sign. Poor Mother! Mr. Sellers had been kind.
 She begged time to consider his offer, so he left, promising to call the next day for the signed
 paper. Her dreams of going to Utah seemed utterly impossible. She sought Divine help in
 her great need. "The dead do come back when there is a real need for it," said Mother in
 telling her experiences in the years that followed. "Three timesthat night your father appeared
 in my room and each time he said, 'Don't bind the children.' I was not asleep. I actually saw
 him."
 

 Our Pioneer Heritage
 Volume 6
 Ft. Douglas—Civil War Veterans
 Civil War Soldiers Buried in Utah
 A Tribute

 RICHARD D. SELLERS—b. enl. Co. M, 2nd Neb. Car., bur. Salt Lake city.
 

 Our Pioneer Heritage
 Volume 14
 Mills and Millers
 Summit County
 Christian Christianson Handcart Company

 Glenwood. President Brigham Young sent his oldest son, Joseph A., to preside over Sevier
 County, and through his influence a sawmill was brought here and installed on Cove
 Mountain, a few miles southeast of Glenwood. In August 1872 they brought in the
 necessary machinery. David Ainsworth was given the job of engineer. The mill did a good
 business, sometimes sawing as many as 7,000 feet of lumber in one day. In June 1875 it
 was moved to Clear Creek Canyon. About June 30, 1877, an unfortunate fire occurred to
 it, which entailed a loss of about 45,000 feet of lumber, 30,000 shingles and 1,000 laths, in
 addition to the loss of time, labor and machinery. Superintendent James Sellers, coming from
 dinner, discovered a small blaze in the mill which was speedily extinguished. The wind was
 unusually high and carried sparks to the mountain side. On the fourth day the wind changed
 and sent the fire down the canyon towards the mill. The men fought it as best they could but
 another fire broke out one-half mile below and an upper current from that direction made
 human effort to save the mill futile. Under the direction of Sellers and James Guss, some of
 the saws and machinery were saved by placing them in the creek. The three women in camp
 who did the cooking, Mrs. March and her two daughters, were forced to run three and
 one-half miles, barely escaping with their lives. After the fire was over, it was found that the
 engine was not damaged, and with the machinery saved, and the skill and perseverance of
 the men, repairs were made and the mill put in running order within a month. When it again
 became necessary to move, Fred Hansen and George Baker built a road to Willow Creek
 and the mill was transferred to that point. —Myrtle Marguardson 


 Our Pioneer Heritage
 Volume 2
 Down Memory Lane
 A Pioneer Mother
 A Tribute

 Father and mother were both members of the Mormon Church at the time of their marriage,
 and at this time he had become president of the branch. From the first they planned on
 emigrating to Utah, but as the children came and expenses grew, they found it impossible to
 save even the small amount for their passage money. There was only one course open for us
 ever to realize our dreams. Father borrowed enough money to take him alone to America.
 He went as far west as Philadelphia where he found work on the fine estate of an old
 Quaker gentleman, Mr. William Sellars. It took him over three long years to pay off his debt
 and to save enough money to pay the passage of his loved ones. Meanwhile, in England,
 Mother worked and hoped and prayed, saving what she could of her small earnings.
 

 Our Pioneer Heritage
 Volume 2
 Down Memory Lane
 A Pioneer Mother
 A Tribute

 People were very kind to us. We were almost entirely without means. After the funeral, Mr.
 Sellars held a conference with Mother and Uncle Alfred. He told her as gently as he could
 that another man was to take Father's place and that she would have to find quarters
 elsewhere; but he made arrangements for her to go to the hospital for her confinement.
 Rhoda made her home with the Sellars' family. Martha went to some of his friends by the
 name of Leisering, the boys were placed in an orphan's home and I was sent to Philadelphia
 to Mrs. Bancroft, a married daughter of Mr. Sellars.
 

 Our Pioneer Heritage
 Volume 2
 Down Memory Lane
 A Pioneer Mother
 A Tribute

 After baby Charles was born, Mother rented a small room in Philadelphia. Then came the
 yearning for her children. What was she to do? Mr. Sellars offered the only solution that he
 saw possible. Feeling sure that Mother would see the wisdom of his decision, he had had
 papers made out "binding out" the older children of the family until they should become of
 age, and brought the papers to Mother to sign. Poor Mother! Mr. Sellers had been kind.
 She begged time to consider his offer, so he left, promising to call the next day for the signed
 paper. Her dreams of going to Utah seemed utterly impossible. She sought Divine help in
 her great need. "The dead do come back when there is a real need for it," said Mother in
 telling her experiences in the years that followed. "Three timesthat night your father appeared
 in my room and each time he said, 'Don't bind the children.' I was not asleep. I actually saw
 him."
 

 Our Pioneer Heritage
 Volume 2
 Down Memory Lane
 A Pioneer Mother
 A Tribute

 Mr. Sellars tried to get her to change her mind, and became almost exasperated when she
 steadily refused. "What are you going to do?" Mother thought of Utah and all it meant to
 her, and raising her head with a certain conviction she answered him, "I'm going home." He
 said no more.
 

 Our Pioneer Heritage
 Volume 2
 Down Memory Lane
 A Pioneer Mother
 A Tribute

 There was much hurried preparation to be ready in time. Mrs. Bancroft cried when Mother
 came for me. "She is so dependable," she told Mother, "that I can trust her implicitly in all
 things." This was a splendid compliment to live up to. Then I came in contact with some
 bitterness that existed against the Church in those days. When Mr. Sellars saw our
 arrangements for leaving, and came to tell Mother good-bye, he said, "Well, I'm glad you
 are going back to England instead of with those Mormons; had you decided to go with
 them, I certainly would have taken steps to have these children taken away from you."
 Mother did not tell him that home meant Utah. She was soon on her way to New York. We
 each had a bundle to look after. Mother found it quite difficult to keep track of all of
 us—Rhoda, Martha, Willie, Eliza, Eddie and baby Charlie—to say nothing of the bundles.
 Here we took the train for the little town of Wyoming, ( town in MO= Cass Co, town in IL = Stark Co, msh)
on the banks of the muddy Missouri  River, where we were to wait until a company of emigrants from England joined us before
 proceeding west by ox-teams.
 

 Our Pioneer Heritage
 Volume 15
 Goodridge—Goodrich Family Story
 Their Only Son
 Weber County

 Rhoda Slade Goodridge was born May 13, 1853 in England, the first child of Amelia and
 William Slade, both members of the Mormon Church. They planned to emigrate to Utah,
 but it was impossible to save enough for their passage, hence a decision was made that he
 would borrow money to bring him to America. William found work in Philadelphia for
 William Sellars, and after three years had made enough money to pay back his loan and
 send for his family. Amelia and her three little girls, Rhoda, Eliza and Martha arrived in
 America in June 1860, where they were met by their husband and father and taken to
 Philadelphia to live in a home provided by Mr. Sellars.
 

 Our Pioneer Heritage
 Volume 15
 Goodridge—Goodrich Family Story
 Their Only Son
 Weber County

 Mr. Sellars, solicitous of the welfare of the bereaved family, asked what their future plans
 would be. Amelia replied "we are going home," meaning they were going to emigrate to
 Utah. He thought they were returning to England and was in complete agreement with that
 arrangement. The family was aided in their endeavor to emigrate by loyal church members
 and friends, and arrived in Utah Nov. 2, 1864. 



 Heart Throbs of the West
 Heart Throbs of the West: Volume 3
 Pioneer Mills and Millers
 Sawmill of Sevier County

 On or about June 30, 1877, an unfortunate accident occurred to it which entailed a loss of
 about 45,000 feet of lumber, 30,000 shingles and 1,000 laths, in addition to the loss of time,
 labor and machinery. Superintendent James Sellars, on coming from dinner, discovered a
 small blaze in the mill. An alarm was given and the flames speedily extinguished, but the wind
 being unusually high, carried sparks to the mountain side, unabated fury in the timber. On the
 fourth day the wind changed and sent it down the canyon towards the mill. The men fought it
 as best they could but another fire broke out one-half mile below and an upper current from
 that direction made human effort to save the mill futile. The workers were induced to stay
 longer, however, and under the direction of Sellars and James Guss, saved some of the
 saws and machinery by placing them in the creek. The three women in camp who did the
 cooking, Mrs. March and her two daughters, were forced to run three and one-half miles,
 barely escaping with their lives.
 

 Heart Throbs of the West
 Heart Throbs of the West: Volume 7
 The Mormons in Arizona and Colorado
 Mississippi Saints

 It is evident that L. M. Peterson remained in Arizona not more than one season, if at all, for
 we find him back in the San Luis Valley as early as March, 1878. Through the courtesy of
 Andrew Jenson, assistant church historian, who has v/vid recollection of the stirring incidents
 here noted, I am permitted to quote freely from the records in his office. The preceding letter
 and all quoted extracts came from that source. "In March, 1878, James Z. Stewart, who
 had come out from Salt Lake City, and three of the southern brethren, namely Milton H.
 Evans, George W. Wilson, and 'Tob' Bagwell (A. G.), travelled from Pueblo to San Luis
 Valley, arriving there in the latter part of the month. They camped at the foot of a hill situated
 about 11/2 miles southwest of the present town of Manassa. These brethren put in a crop of
 small grain, vegetables and potatoes, at a place locally known as La Isila on the Conejos
 River, about five miles south of the present town of Manassa. There they bought a Mexican
 claim and lived in a Mexican house without families. These were the first three settlers of
 southern saints to arrive in San Luis Valley; they bought Mexican claims near Los Cerritos, a
 small Mexican town, situated three miles southeast of the present town of Manassa on the
 north bank of the Conejos River. At this place they found Lawrence M. Peterson from
 Savolla, New Mexico, and another family from New Mexico, who had arrived a short time
 before. Soon after the arrival of the three southern brethren Alonzo G. Blair arrived from
 Coholla, New Mexico. The families mentioned constituted the first families of Latter-day
 Saints in the San Luis Valley. Bro. Stewart remained a few weeks with these families and
 held a few meetings with them in private houses, but after the Saints, who had wintered at
 Pueblo under the direction of Daniel R. Sellars, who had presided over the saints while
 encamped at that place, took charge of the colony until Bishop Hans Jensen Hals arrived in
 the San Luis Valley in October, 1878, and located in and about the village of Los Cerritos
 soon after Bishop Jensen and his company arrived from Utah. A small crop was raised in
 1878 in the new colony; it was harvested by Daniel R. Sellars." 



 

 Treasures of Pioneer History
 Treasures of Pioneer History: Vol 3
 The Mormons in Mexico
 Mormon Colonies in Mexico

 Colonia Pacheco—Another of the mountain colonies was located on a piece of property purchased by
 the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. George C. Williams, sometimes spoken of as the
 preaching parson, and his son-in-law, Peter Dillman, were the first settlers. Other settlers followed until it
 became a thriving community. Jesse N. Smith was its first L. D. S. bishop with James Sellers and
 Christopher B. Heaton as counselors. It was a most productive settlement; and was named in honor of
 the Mexican general, Pacheco.
 

 Treasures of Pioneer History
 Treasures of Pioneer History: Vol 3
 Your First Town Government
 Sevier County

 In 1878, a second attempt was made to incorporate the city of Richfield in Sevier County. It was passed
 by the State Legislature and signed by the governor and the following officers were elected: Mayor,
 Franklin Spencer; Councilmen, George W. Bean, Albert K. Thurber, Paul Poulson, James M. Peterson,
 George W. Baker, Oke Salisbury, William Morrison; Recorder, John A. Hellstrom; Treasurer, Wm. C. C.
 Orrock; City Marshal, James Sellers; Pound-keeper, Andrew Poulson; Superintendent of streets, Hans
 Christensen; Policemen, Benjamin Carter, G. T. Bean and Henry Outzen.
 

 Treasures of Pioneer History
 Treasures of Pioneer History: Vol 4
 They Came in 1855
 Joseph Darnbrough Reynolds—England

 On November 22, 1877 his wife, Elizabeth, passed away leaving him with seven small children. On May
 9, 1878 he married Samantha Jane Sellers who became the mother of six children. Although Joseph was
 always busy in community affairs, he never forgot the important thing that brought him to America. His
 Church was almost uppermost in his thoughts and actions. In 1882 he started merchandising and for
 thirty years was one of Springville’s successful merchants. In 1887 he married Sarah Ann Williams and
 shortly after fulfilled a mission to his native land.
 

 Treasures of Pioneer History
 Treasures of Pioneer History: Vol 6
 The Story of Utah’S Canyons
 Parley’S Canyon

 Baptism—In the fall of 1858 Ephraim K. Hanks took up a ranch between Big Mountain and Little
 Mountain which he named Mountain Dell. Bines Dixon, my husband’s father, was one of the early
 settlers of Mountain Dell and lived there until 1899, when the city bought most of the property to secure
 the water rights prior to the building of the reservoir. Bines Dixon was a soldier of fortune and his wife,
 Mary Sellers, was a Utah pioneer who walked most of the way across the plains. One of the largest and
 finest farms in this vicinity was owned by Francis Armstrong. He owned his own threshing machine and
 was weeks threshing the grain on his extensive holdings. Other smaller farm owners were John McRae,
 Charles Morrell, James Bullock, Peter Olsen, Chris Nielson, Swen Olsen, Magnus Hansen and a family of
 Smiths for whom Smith’s Fork was named. 


 Treasures of Pioneer History
 Treasures of Pioneer History: Vol 4
 So Our Children May Know
 Her First Doll
 page 202
 James A. Smith and his wife, Annie Sellars Smith, had left their old home in Utah as a bride and groom
 and had established themselves in a humble cabin on Willow Creek about twelve miles northeast of
 Idaho Falls in the year 1886. Annie had come to America first with [p.202]her parents, but James soon
 followed to claim his sweetheart. Annie was lovely with her beautiful auburn hair and, although the first
 years brought many hardships to the young people, she was of a happy, helpful nature. Soon there
 were two little boys and a girl to gladden the hearts of the parents. The little girl, Mamie, was old for her
 years and dependable. She longed for a baby sister, and when one came to the home, they christened
 her Clara. Mamie joyfully claimed her for her special responsibility. 



 
 

 An Enduring Legacy
 An Enduring Legacy: Volume Two
 Economic and Territorial Progress
 Chronology —1878

 May. Sun. 19 —Daniel R. Sellers and Mary A. Kirtland, with their respective families,
 arrived at a place near Los Cerritos, Conejos County, Colorado, the first Saints from the
 Southern States to settle in San Luis Valley, a location earlier selected by the authorities of
 the Church as a gathering place for the Saints from the Southern States. Other families soon
 followed.
 

 An Enduring Legacy
 An Enduring Legacy: Volume Two
 Economic and Territorial Progress
 New Settlements

 Action in this direction being taken, it was now time for the southern emigrants to make their
 final move. Hoping to get a reduced railway fare for them, Stewart returned to Pueblo and
 persuaded the Denver and Rio Grande to allow them the same rates previously promised
 Elder Morgan —$1.25 for each person over twenty years of age. In the meantime, Stewart
 had authorized Presiding Elder Sellers to take a small group to Los Cerritos.
 

 An Enduring Legacy
 An Enduring Legacy: Volume Two
 Economic and Territorial Progress
 New Settlements

 The party was composed of Daniel R. Sellers and his mother, Jane Surratt Sellers, his wife
 Mary and their three children; also Daniel's widowed niece, Mary Ann Sellers Kirtland and
 six children. Upon arriving at Fort Garland, Sellers hired an elderly Mexican with a decrepit
 wagon and Mexican ponies —the only transportation available —to take them to Los
 Cerritos. By the time all the baggage was piled onto the ancient wagon, it held more than it
 should have, but on top of this was placed Grandma Sellers —tied on so she wouldn't fall.
 Slowly the little caravan made its way up the railroad grade and began to cross the tracks,
 when one of the wheels broke. Grandma nearly slid off, but she finally reached the ground
 safely and with the others unloaded the wagon in time to get it off the track before the train
 arrived.
 

 An Enduring Legacy
 An Enduring Legacy: Volume Two
 Economic and Territorial Progress
 New Settlements

 Undaunted, the little Mexican located another wagon, and again the load was packed,
 including Grandma. By this time a cold, piercing wind was blowing, scattering sand and dust
 and biting the faces of the travelers. Vision was greatly impaired, and for quite a time they
 were forced to move at a snail's pace. It took two days to get from Fort Garland to Los
 Cerritos, a distance of about forty miles, and with the exception of Grandma Sellers,
 everyone in the party walked or, in the case of small children, was carried. They reached
 their destination at midnight, May 19, 1878.
 

 An Enduring Legacy
 An Enduring Legacy: Volume Two
 Economic and Territorial Progress
 New Settlements

 Such was the "auspicious" arrival of the first contingent of LDS settlers in San Luis Valley.
 Fortunately, Elder Peterson and his wife, living temporarily in a small three-room house,
 took the entire Sellers party in and provided them with food and beds.
 

 An Enduring Legacy
 An Enduring Legacy: Volume Two
 Economic and Territorial Progress
 New Settlements

 Transition of the remaining emigrants was made without serious incident. Most were able to
 find small Mexican houses in which to live, and as the land was purchased, farms and
 gardens were put in. Early in October, Hans Jensen of Manti, who had been appointed to
 take charge of the Saints in Conejos County, arrived in company with several others, and
 proceeded to organize a branch of the Church. Named as his counselors were John Allen
 and Soren C. Berthelsen, from Utah; Lawrence M. Peterson, branch clerk and recorder;
 Daniel R. Sellers and William Cox, teachers.
 

 An Enduring Legacy
 An Enduring Legacy: Volume Nine
 Sanctuary in Mexico
 The Juarez Academy

 Colonia Pacheco, 1887. This community, named for a famous Mexican general, was
 established in the tops of the Sierra Madre, nearly seven thousand feet above the sea. It
 occupied a picturesque spot in a little valley known as the Corrales Basin. This tract was
 purchased after it had been carefully explored in 1885. The irrigable land was not extensive,
 but timber was abundant. George C. Williams, sometimes spoken of as the preaching
 parson, and his son-in-law, Peter Dillman, were the first settlers. Others followed until it
 became a thriving community. Jesse N. Smith was its first LDS bishop, with James Sellers
 and Christopher B. Heaton as counselors. It was a very productive settlement.
 

 An Enduring Legacy
 An Enduring Legacy: Volume Nine
 Sanctuary in Mexico
 Colonia Pacheco

 Other people soon arrived—the Scotts, Sellers, Rowleys, Cooleys, Blacks, Heatons,
 Porters, Carrolls and many others. A log schoolhouse-churchhouse had to be erected. A
 ditch from Water Canyon was to be dug so we could plant orchards, gardens, and have
 water for culinary purposes. In the meantime, all of our water had to be either carried or
 hauled in barrels from the streams a mile away.



Obituaries from the Salt Lake Tribune,Utah 1998
                                Patricia "Pat" K. Salzetti
   Patricia "Pat" Ruth Kearsley Salzetti, age 79, died December 8, 1991.
Born September 5,
1912, in Salt
   Lake City to Joseph and Elizabeth Sellers Kearsley. She married Alfred
A. Salzetti July
2, 1931, in Salt
   Lake City. She played the piano and was a beautiful artist. She loved
antiques and was
an avid reader.
                              Member of the LDS Church.
   She is survived by her husband, Alfred; daughter and son, Carol Ann
Salzetti, Pots
Town, Penn.; Victor
  A. Salzetti, Salt Lake City; sister, Lucille K. Dean, Salt Lake City.
Funeral services
will be held Friday, 12
   Noon, December 13, 1991, Wasatch Lawn Mortuary Chapel, 3401 So.
Highland Drive, where
friends
   may call Friday, one hour prior to services. Interment, Wasatch Lawn
Memorial Park. T
12/11N 12/11

                                   LeRoy A. Holt
       LeRoy Alvin Holt, age 58, died October 28, 1991 in a Salt Lake
hospital after a
short illness.
   Born March 21, 1933 in Pocatello, Idaho to Brigham Payton and Violet
Tillotson Holt.
Married Beverly
   Slater, August 24, 1957, Springville, Utah; later solemnized in the
Salt Lake LDS
Temple. He sang with
   the Jay Welch Chorale. Had a great artistic talent and used that talent
in landscaping,
flower arranging
                                    and poetry.
   Survived by wife; children, Mrs. Matthew (Teresa) Sellers, Steve LeRoy,
Scott Jason,
Blake V., David
   Payton and wife, Kim; Mrs. Boyd (Andrea) Dial and Tara Lynn, five
grandchildren;
mother; brothers,
                    Jack B., Jr., Charles Eugene, Garry Gene and Gary Lee.
   Funeral services will be held Friday, 12 noon, in the Millcreek 2nd
Ward, 4200 South
420 East. Friends
    may call Thursday from 6-8 p.m. at the Jenkins-Soffe Mortuary, 4760
South State and
Friday at the
      Church one hour prior to service. Interment: Utah Veteran's Memorial
Park. T 10/30N3
10/30

  Obituary: Willard Edwin Done, 78, son of Anne Sellers and Joseph
Franklin Done, died on
December 27,
  1992 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He died of ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) at
home with his
family, after a brief
                                   hospitalization.
   He was born on February 12, 1914 in Richfield, Utah, but spent his
early years in El
Paso, Texas. The
  family moved to Salt Lake City in 1931. His attendance at Brigham Young
University,
beginning in 1931,
    was temporarily interrupted by a mission for the LDS Church in
California. He returned
to BYU to
  graduate in 1939 in Business Marketing and Accounting. He was married to
Larene Butler
November 17,
   1941 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. In spite of his university degree, he
was fortunate
to be able to earn
  his livelihood in a field more closely related to his hobby in the
electronic
communications industry. After a
   few short-lived jobs and civilian service at Hill Air Force Base during
World War II,
he began a career
                        with KSL Radio that lasted almost 34 years.
    He was actively involved in the LDS Church throughout his life,
serving in various
positions including
  Stake Mission president, High Priest group leader and teacher in several
capacities.
Since his retirement,
                     his main interests have been his family and
genealogy.
  He is survived by his wife of 51 years and the following sons and
daughters, Andrea
Mortensen, Ken and
  Tania Done, Alan and Kathleen Done, Bryce and Rita Done, Michele Camus;
13 grandchildren
and two
    great-grandchildren, all of Salt Lake City; his brothers and sisters,
Mary Curtis,
Hayward, California;
   Melvin J. Done, Orem; A. Lee Done, West Hills, California; Joanne
Roberts, Tooele;
Arthur A. Done,
      serving a Temple Mission in Mexico City. There were four brothers
that preceded him
in death.
   Funeral services will be Wednesday, Dec. 30, 1992 at 12 noon in the
Hawthorne Ward, 808
Roosevelt
   Ave. (1450 So.) Friends may call Tuesday evening at Larkin Mortuary,
260 E. South
Temple, from 6-8
  p.m. and at the church Wednesday at 11 a.m. Interment, Larkin Sunset
Lawn Cemetery. N
12/28 T 12/2

                                  Doug A. Casper
          BOUNTIFUL--Douglas Alma Casper age 56, passed away Monday April
6, 1992.
    He was born November 2, 1935 in Menan, Idaho to Alma Edwin and Lucy
Sellers Casper.
Married
    Norma Graham, August 31, 1955 in the Idaho Falls LDS Temple. He served
a mission to
the Central
   Atlantic States, in the bishopric, on the High Council, as a Scout
Master, and many
years as a devoted
   Primary teacher. His love of the great outdoors was surpassed only by
his deep love for
his family. He
  loved doing things for others in his own quiet way. He loved to garden
and fish, sing,
and make up songs,
                                for his 15 grandchildren.
  Survived by his wife Norma; three sons, Kurt and Tami Casper, Tracy,
Calif.; Mark and
JoLene Casper,
    Woods Cross; Bruce and Rachel Casper, Salt Lake City; two daughters,
Debra and Jim L.
Kentner,
   Concord, Calif.; Sandra and Paul Curtis, West Bountiful; Brothers and
Sister, Edwin A.
Casper, Menan,
   Idaho; Lila Summers, Blackfoot, Idaho; Louella Ardnt, Phoenix, Ariz.;
Darlene Newbold,
San Antonio,
                          Texas. Preceded in death by his parents.
  Funeral Services will be held Saturday April 11, 1992, 12 noon at the
Bountiful 34th
Ward 540 North 1200
   East. Friends may call Friday evening 6-8 p.m. at the Russon Brothers,
Bountiful
Mortuary, 295 North
  Main, and Saturday, April 11, from 10:45-11:45 a.m. prior to the
services. Interment,
Lakeview Cemetery.
                                    T 4/9 N 4/9
 

                                   Flora W. Sellers
        Flora Weston Sellers, age 73, died at her home in Salt Lake City,
Utah, February
29, 1992.
  She was born August 31, 1918, in Manassa, Colorado, to Grover and
Margaret Christensen
Weston. She
   married Glenn L. Sellers, March 26, 1938, in Manassa, Colorado; their
marriage was
solemnized in the
  Mesa, Arizona LDS Temple, March 29, 1951. He preceded her in death
September 14, 1985.
She was an
               active member of the LDS Church. She loved family history
research.
     Survived by two sons, Arlen G. Sellers, Clearwater, Florida; Brian L.
Sellers, Salt
Lake City; six
   grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; two brothers, G. Dwayne
Weston, Bountiful,
Utah; James R.
  Weston, Gainsville, Texas; three sisters, Mavis Holland, Manassa,
Colorado; Mary
Christensen, Alamosa,
                        Colorado; Dorothy Bradford, Midvale, Utah.
  Funeral services will be held Wednesday, March 4, 1992, 1 p.m. at the
Butler 12th Ward,
2700 East 7000
   So. Friends may call Tuesday, 6 to 8 p.m. at the Mackay Cottonwood
Mortuary, 4670 South
Highland
  Drive and one hour prior to the service at the church. Interment:
Greenlawn Cemetery,
Farmington, New
                                 Mexico. N 3/2 N 3/3
                                 Taylor Hyde Merrill

                   Obituary: Bertrand L. Turgeon, 88, died February 27,
1993.
    Born in Wapello, Iowa, July 6, 1904 to Harry and Flossie Sellers
Turgeon. Married
Margaret Tracy
                  January 29, 1930 in Des Moines, Iowa. She died June 3,
1987.
           Employed in the film industry all his adult life. Member
Central Christian
Church.
      Survived by daughter, Peggy Wylie; son, Bob Turgeon and their
spouses; six
grandchildren, six
                      great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by his wife.
   Graveside services will be held on Monday, 11 a.m., March 1, 1993 at
Wasatch Lawn
Memorial Park,
     3401 Highland Drive (Rest Haven Section). Funeral directors, Wasatch
Lawn Mortuary.
In lieu of
       flowers, family suggests contributions be made to the Cancer or
Heart Fund. T 2/28
N 2/28
 

       Obituary: SELLERS, Lillian E., 71, Aug. 3, 1994 Salt Lake City,
Larkin Mortuary,
Salt Lake City.
JUST LISTING - Obit Not Here
SELLERS, James K., infant, March 26, 1995 Salt Lake City, Memorial Estates
Mortuary, Salt
Lake City listed under DEAHTS

Obituary: SELLERS, Wanda M., 77, May 5, 1996 Provo, Berg Mortuary, Provo.
JUST LISTING - Obit Not Here

Obituary: SELLERS, Johanna H., 89, March 7, 1996 Salt Lake City, Holbrook
Mortuary, Salt
Lake City.

Obituary: SELLERS, Lucinda H., 41, Sept. 15, 1997 Salt Lake City, Goff
Mortuary, Midvale.
 

  Obituary: MURRAY--Lowell E. Whitaker, 75, passed away March 23, 1992, in
a Murray
hospital from
                                   natural causes.
  Born June 3, 1916 in Penrose, Utah, to Thomas Charles and Ina Regina
Rohwer Whitaker.
Married Susan
  Finn; later divorced. He was a truck driver for Armco Steel. Veteran
World War II and
Korean Conflict.
                  Former member FOE #1760, Murray VFW. Avid fisherman.
   Survivors: two sons and two daughters, Eugene T. "Gene" Whitaker; Judy
Vasquez; Gary L.
Whitaker;
    Mayree Whitaker; 13 grandchildren; half-brother, Lloyd Whitaker;
half-sister, Vera
Sellars; a close
  personal friend of 15 years, Bonnie Cowley. Preceded in death by a
granddaughter, two
brothers and one
                                      sister.
  Graveside services Saturday, 1 p.m., Utah Veterans Memorial Cemetery at
Camp Williams,
17111 South
   Camp Williams Rd., Bluffdale. Friends may call at Jenkins-Soffe
Mortuary, 4760 So.
State, Sat., 11:30
                            a.m. to 12:30 p.m. T 3/26 T 3/26
 

                                  Lloyd S. Mulvey
   Lloyd Samuel Mulvey, beloved father, grandfather, and
great-grandfather, age 79, passed away August
                 31, 1992 in Salt Lake City, after a courageous battle
with cancer.
    Born November 8, 1912 in Myton, Utah to George H. and Hester Kettle
Mulvey. Married Lorraine     McNeil, Sept. 16, 1937. Lloyd spent a lifetime unselfishly giving his
time and energy to his family and    friends. Member of the LDS Church. Superintendent of the South Salt
Lake Waste Water Treatment       Plant from 1958 until his retirement in 1988. Past-president of the
Utah Water Pollution Control                    Association and recipient of the William D. Hatfield
Award.
  Survived by daughters and sons, Mrs. Norman S. (Jean) Wing, Richland,
Washington; Mrs. Gene (Janet)
      Sollers, Alan (Joe) Mulvey, and Delbert L. Mulvey, all Salt Lake
City; 14 grandchildren and 14          great-grandchildren; brother, Charles Mulvey. Preceded in death
by his beloved wife.
  Funeral services Thurs., September 3, 1 p.m., Larkin Mortuary, 260 East
So. Temple, where friends may    call Weds. evening 6-8 p.m., and Thurs., one hour prior to services.
Interment, Murray City Cemetery,
                            725 East 5600 South. T 9/2 N 9/2



         Thu, 21 Mar 2002 22:06:53 -0700
  From:
       hayesh38@hotmail.com
      UTSALTLA-L@rootsweb.com
Subject:  [UTSaltLake] Re: 1912 Obituary lookup please

http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec/msg/an/HmB.2ACE/574.1

Marie
I could only find a Robert Sellers.
Here's the information just in case.
Robert Sellers
Born 1839
Died 04/11/1912
Buried in Salt Lake City Cemetery

Helen