CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
from BOB BAIRD
rwbaird@aol.com

                 Re: Chronology - Reynolds Family of Virginia
 Posted by: Bob Baird (ID *****2890)
                                                      Date: January 14, 2003 at 14:31:53
 In Reply to: Re: Chronology - Reynolds Family of Virginia by Marie Sellers Hollinger
                                                                     of 10051

What you quoted was someone's (inaccurate) summary of a Virginia land patent abstracted in Nugent's "Cavaliers and
Pioneers", Volume I, page 363.

He did not actually "trade seven servants". He traded the headrights for seven persons, who may or may not have been
servants. Persons who paid for the passage of themselves or others were entitled to 50 acres of land for each person whose
passage was paid for. A certificate to that effect was issued by a court, which could then be used to "pay for" the patent. The
certificate itself could be bought and sold, so the person who actually used it for a patent was not necessarily the same person
who paid for the passage.

The patent in question may be found in Virginia Land Patent Book 4, pages 243-4. It is a patent to Christompher Reynolds
(Junior) with the following note written into the margin: “This patent renewed in Richard Jordan’s name the 18th March 1662 to
whom it is assigned by the said Reynolds.”

The patent reads as follows:

"...give and grant unto Christopher Reynolds 350 acres lying in the Isle of Wight County Beginning at a marked red oak on a
hill by the west freshett by the miles end of 450 acres patented by Christopher Reynolds deceased and running along the said
freshett for length 32 poles and for breadth west southwest 50 poles to a marked white oak [this part totals 100 acres] then
beginning at the upper side of the forementioned patent on the Cypress Creek for the other 250 acres and running along the
said Cypress to the marked trees of the land lately in the possession of Mr. Neall & so between the said land of Mr. Neall and
the forementioned patent of Christopher Reynolds deceased to the miles end. The said land being due unto Christopher
Reynolds by and for the transportation of seven persons & dated the 25th of November 1657."

Note that the seven persons are not named in the actual patent, but their names are given in the Nugent abstract.

Nugent abstracted the name of the adjoining landowner s "Mr. Nutt", a name that does not elsewhere appear in Isle of Wight
records. I read it as "Mr. Neall", meaning Christopher Neale, who we know was a resident of Isle of Wight at the time.

     Re: Chronology - Reynolds Family of Virginia Marie Sellers Hollinger 1/15/03
         Re: Chronology - Reynolds Family of Virginia Bob Baird 1/15/03
             Re: Chronology - Reynolds Family of Virginia Marie Sellers Hollinger 1/15/03

                      http://genforum.genealogy.com/reynolds/messages/10042.html
                                                             
=========================================


http://genforum.genealogy.com/reynolds/messages/8112.html
Posted by: Rod Stucker, Professional Genealogist
                                                       Date: August 28, 2001 at 10:30:04

                                                                        Chronology of The Reynolds Families of Virginia
  Though we have not yet examined the sources listed in this research report by Susan Clement, her research appears to be
well documented. Hence, as listed in our report, further research on the ancestry of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant,
should be conducted in connection with Edward Bennett and the other original settlers of Mr. Bennett’s Warrosquyoake Bay
settlement. The George and Christopher Reynolds of Bristol, England, who are listed below [Virginia Magazine of History &
Biography, Vol. XVIII, Virginia Gleanings in England, p. 308; 16 Mar 1634/5 - Christopher Reynolds, son of George
Reynolds deceased and brother of Anne Reynolds listed as kinsmen in will of Henry Hobson of City of Bristol, Inn Holder
(Doc.#173a-c)], should also be researched for a possible relationship to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. According
to the notes accompanying the publication of Henry Hobson’s will, he was a Mayor of Bristol, England. His grandson, Miles
Cary, was the emigrant to Virginia. Though there is no direct connection to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., of Isle of Wight County,
listed in this will, the name pattern of a Christopher Reynolds listed as the son of George Reynolds is intriguing when compared
with the information on the Reynolds families of Gravesend in County Kent and London. Hence, additional research should be
conducted in the records of Bristol in order to ascertain if there is a connection between Christopher Reynolds, Sr., of Isle of
Wight and the Reynolds families of Bristol.

       In regards to the ancestry of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, there are other theories which have been proposed.
These theories have been compiled by Sybil R. “Lee” Taylor of the Reynolds Family Association:

       We have no conclusive proof of the parents of Christopher, and at least two other writers disagreed with Col. Tillman.
J.R.B. Hathaway, in 1901, stated in The North Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol II, No 4, Oct 1901
[Reprinted - Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1979, pp135-136] "Parker Family," that Christopher was the brother of
Cecily, and the son of Thomas Reynolds: "The grandfather of Cicely Reynolds was Thomas Jordan, of Dorsetshire, England,
grand daughter (sic), the mother of Cicely married a Reynolds. Her mother's maiden name was Cicely Fitzpen or Phippen, and
she was the daughter of Robert Phippen and his wife Cicely or Cicellie Jordan. Robert Phippen was the son of one Joseph
Phippen, whose mother was Alice Pierce, and thus Ciceley Reynolds was related to Capt. William Pierce and his wife Joane...
Twelve years later, her brother, Christopher Reynolds, arrived on the 'John and Francis'...."

       In 1978, William Glasgow Reynolds privately published The Reynolds History Annotated (1475-1977), in which he sided
with Judge Ray. Reynolds identified the father of Christopher as Thomas Reynolds b. ca 1594 who married Cecily Phippen b.
1575 in Dorsetshire, England. "Christopher Reynolds was the son of Thomas Reynolds [Ray Index, p.135] born 1604 in
Dorsetshire, England, and died 1654 (Isle of Wight) Virginia; married 1639 Mrs. Elizabeth (Matthews) Rivers relict of George
Rivers and daughter of Anthony Matthews. Worth S. Ray, in Index to Hathaway's NC Historical & Genealogical Register p.
135, states "Christopher Reynolds was born in Dorsetshire, England, although Tillman takes a contrary position that it was
County Kent, England. Boddie in Historical Southern Families, Vol II, 'Reynolds of Isle of Wight,' p. 201, seems to agree with
Judge Ray."

       Unfortunately, none of these writers provided sources for their information. It doesn't seem likely that Thomas and Cecily
could be the father of Christopher and Cecily. Please refer in this book to the article about "Cecily ?Reynolds? of Virginia" for a
discussion of this parentage. To date, no record has been found that clearly relates Christopher of Isle of Wight to Christopher
of County Kent, nor to Thomas and Cecily.

       In addition to the above, an article on Cicely Jordan also appeared in the Virginia Historical Magazine of History and
Biography as represented here by Sybill “Lee” Taylor of the Reynolds Family Association:

              LINKS IN A CHAIN
              by James P.C. Southall in
              The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography
              Vol. LI, No. 4, October 1943
              Pages 383-386

       James P.C. Southall, in "Links In A Chain," wrote of Samuel Jordan and Cicely his wife, and substantiates the information
in the foregoing except for Cecily's ancestry. He agrees that Temperance Baley and Mary and Margaret Jordan were Cicely's
daughters.

              "...it is to be inferred that Mrs. Cicely Jordan was born in 1601 and was therefore a year younger than Samuel
Jordan's eldest son. In other words, widower Samuel Jordan who married widow Cicely about 1 December 1620 was old
enough to be her father. Whereas the Muster reports that Cicely came to Virginia in the 'Swan' in 1610, we are led to infer
from Samuel Jordan's patent that the year was 1611. The latter is evidently correct, for the 'Swan,' the 'Tryall' and the 'Noah'
were the three ships of Sir Thomas Gates's fleet which reached Jamestown towards the end of August 1611. Others who came
in the 'Swan' with ten-year old Cicely were: Richard Biggs, 41 years old, Thomas Boulding, John Fludd, Gent., Thomas
Garnett, servant of Captain William Powell, Lieut. Albiano Lupo, Gent., 40 years old, Thomas Stepney, 35 years old, John
Taylor, 37 years old, and Amyle Wayne, 30 years old. Incidentally, Elizabeth Dunthorne, 38 years old, wife of Thomas
Dunthorne, Robert Greenleafe, and John Sleight came in the 'Noah,' and Henry Coltman in the 'Tryal,' all at the same time.
Lady Gates and her two daughters had accompanied Sir Thomas Gates on this voyage, but Lady Gates died in the West Indies
without ever reaching Virginia. Whether any of the individuals above mentioned was related to our Cicely, who were her
parents or guardians, and what was her own name, are questions that cannot be answered. Just as the burden of the famous
song in the Two Gentlemen of Verona was, Who is Sylvia? so here we ask, but ask in vain, Who was Cicely?"

       Southall's references: 19 Nugent, introductory pages et seq , pp. 5, 6, 21, 25, 34 [all relative to the names of persons on
the three ships; and 50 V 77.

       [1] Peter Wilson Coldham, The Complete Book of Emigrants 1607-1660, A Comprehensive Listing Compiled from
English Public Records, p. 35-46: 16 Feb 1624. List of the names of the living in Virginia and of those who have died since
April 1623 from PRO:CO1/3/5 (Public Record Office, Kew, Richmond, Surry TW9 4DU, England): At Jordan's Journey.
Living: Sislye Jordan; Temperance Bailey; Mary Jordan; Margery Jordan; William Farrar...

       Though this information appears to have been properly documented, further research is required in order to verify the
connection between Cicely Jordan and Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. Notice that Cicely’s maiden name is not listed
in the above records. Hence, the original records should be searched in order to verify that her maiden name was Reynolds.
Notice also that there was a Richard Biggs who arrived with this group of immigrants including the ten year old Cecily aboard
the Swan at Jamestown in August 1611. This corresponds with the fact that there was also an eleven year old girl named
Elizabeth Biggs and a six month old child named Phillip Biggs who were among the nine servants transported to Virginia aboard
the Speedwell in 1635 by “Chri: Reinhold” (Doc.#161a). This “Chri: Reinhold” appears to have been the same person as
Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant as listed below. The Biggs family also appears fairly frequently in the Isle of Wight
County records as listed below in this report.

       In his book entitled The Reynolds Family Annotated, attorney William Glasgow Reynolds lists that Cecily Jordan was the
older sister of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. The author further claims that Cecily came to Jamestown, Virginia
aboard the ship Swan which arrived in August 1610. She married first to Thomas Bailey and had a daughter named
Temperance Bailey who was born in 1616. After Thomas Bailey died from malaria, Cecily married secondly to Samuel Jordan,
a cousin of her mother. After Samuel Jordan died, she married William Farrar who died in 1635. Cecily married twice after the
death of William Farrar; Peter Montague who died in 1659 by whom she had seven children during their twenty three years of
marriage; Thomas Parker by whom their were no heirs (Doc.#194a-d). As listed above, a copy of The Reynolds Family
Annotated, by attorney William Glasgow Reynolds was provided to us by Sybil “Lee” Taylor who retyped the entire text and
then emailed us this book chapter by chapter including endnotes. Though this book was well written, it does not appear to
properly document the actual source materials, i.e. the endnotes are not connected with the text. There are no superscripts in
the text which refer to the endnotes. Though we do not have access to the original publication, it was filed with the Library of
Congress card number: 78-61854. According to Lee Taylor, William Glasgow Reynolds was an original founder of the
Reynolds Family Association.

       Sybil “Lee” Taylor of the Reynolds Family Association also provides the following in regards to the
Warrosquyoake/Waresquoack massacre which occurred about the same time period in which Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the
immigrant arrived in Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622:

       22 Mar 1621, At [Edward] Bennett's Plantation only 86 of the scheduled settlers had arrived at the time of the
Waresquoack massacre (the Good Friday massacre, 22 March 1621-22); 33 survivors managed to drive off the attackers
[Boddie 17th Century Isle of Wight County Virginia, pp. 35-6]. Robert Bennett and his new secretary, Christopher Reynolds,
were among them [W.G. Reynolds]. By RFA [Reynolds Family Association] member Robert A. Reynolds, Roselle, New
Jersey (obtained from Sybil “Lee” Taylor of the Reynolds Family Association)

       This is interesting information which appears to correspond with the above records. However the statement that
Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, was the “new secretary” for Robert Bennett is not documented other than the
reference to “W.G. Reynolds” which stands for William Glasgow Reynolds’s book entitled “The Reynolds Family Annotated,”
which was copyrighted in 1978. A copy of this book was provided to us by Sybil “Lee” Taylor who retyped the entire text and
then emailed us this book chapter by chapter including endnotes. Though this book was well written, it does not appear to
properly document the actual source materials, i.e. the endnotes are connected with the text. There are no superscripts in the
text which refer to the endnotes. Though we do not have access to the original publication, according to Sybil “Lee” Taylor, it
was filed with the Library of Congress card number: 78-61854. According to some historians of Isle of Wight County, Robert
Bennett was a brother or nephew of Edward Bennett who was in charge of Edward Bennett’s Isle of Wight plantation in
Colonial Virginia. Robert A. Reynolds of the Reynolds Family Association lists the following in regards to the Warrosquyoake
massacre:

       19 Apr 1622, Gov. Francis Wyatt ordered Capt. Ralph Hamor to bring the survivors to Jamestown Island for their safety
[Records of the Virginia Company of London, III, part ii, p. 50a]. On 7 Oct 1622, Edward Bennett of the plantation of
Warascoake requested that his people might be returned thereto [Records of the Virginia Company Vol. II, pp. 104-5.]

       Christopher Reynolds' name appears on a post-massacre muster of living inhabitants at Waresquoack taken 16 Feb 1623.
[List of names of persons living in Virginia, 16 Feb 1623, set forth in Hotten Lists of Emigrants to America 16--1700, p. 169 et
seq. Christopher Reynolds name appears on page 181 as a survivor at Warwick Squrake [Records of the Virginia Company
of London, III, par ii, p. 50a]. Waresquoack Plantation was located in the vicinity of present day Smithfield, Virginia].

       The above information, which appears to be properly documented, corresponds with the following which was published in
the history entitled Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, an abstract of which reads as
follows:

       16 Feb 1623, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 37, Chr. Reinholds [Christopher
Reynolds] was among 33 inhabitants listed in a census for Warrascoyack [Warrosquyoake County], Virginia (Doc.#131v):

       John Batt, Henry Pinffe, Wassell Weblin, Anthony Read, Frances Woodson, Henry Phillips, Peter Collins, Chr. Reinold’s,
Edward Mabin, John Maldman, Thomas Collins, George Rushmore, Thomas Spencer, George Clarke, Rich. Bartlett, Frances
Anthony, Franse, Margrett, negroes; John Bennett, Nicholas Skinner, John Atkins, John Pollentin, Margrett Pollentin, Mary, a
maid, Henry Woodward, Thomas Sawyer, Thomas, a boye. Total 33, including 4 negroes (Doc.#131v,169a)

       Notice that there is a boy named Thomas listed in this 1623 census for Warrosquyoake County, Virginia. However,
Christopher Reynolds, Sr.,who is listed as “Chr. Reinold ” in this census, is not listed as a boy even though he would have been
only thirteen years old if he was born in 1610 as indicated by his age in the passenger ship list for the Speedwell which arrived
in Virginia in 1635 as listed below. However, the term “boye” as it used above appears to refer to a “Negro boy” named
Thomas. Notice that no surname was listed for this Negro boy. This corresponds with the listing of the other three Negroes
named Franse, Margrett and Mary the maid, none of whom are listed with surnames. The fact that this census lists all
inhabitants indicates that it was not concerned with either the age or the color of the inhabitants, i.e. all inhabitants were listed
regardless of age or race.

       7 Feb 1624, The Original Lists of Person of Quality by John Camden Hotten, p. 241; Christopher Reynolds' is listed in a
muster of Edward Bennett’s servants in Wariscoyacke. There were twelve servants, two of whom were Negroes. Similar to
the 1623 census, this muster lists that Christopher Reynolds immigrated to Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622
(Doc.#189a)

       Notice that this information is not listed in the history entitled Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John
B. Boddie.       In comparison with the twelve servants listed in 1624, notice that in the previous year in 1623, that there were
thirty three inhabitants residing in the Warrosquyoake settlement. In just one year the number of Edward Bennett’s servants
decreased by twenty one, apparently due to the Indian attacks on the new settlement.

       Robert A. Reynolds, a member of the Reynolds Family Association lists the following: “Shortly after the 1624 muster, the
Virginia Council dispatched Edward Bennett to London to seek a Colonial monopoly for Virginia in the tobacco trade with
England. Christopher accompanied him and remained as his secretary during the time it took Mr. Bennett to secure the
monopoly [W.G. Reynolds: Boddie, 17th Century Isle of Wight County Virginia, p. 38].” Though the information about
dispatching Edward Bennett to England corresponds with the reference to Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia,
by John B. Boddie, pp. 36-38, nowhere in that history does it list Christopher Reynolds as the secretary of Edward Bennett.

       25 Feb 1625, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 37, Christopher Reynolds listed
in a muster of the inhabitants of Wariscoyack [Warrosquyoake County], Virginia, who were servants of Mr. Edward Bennett
(Doc.#131v)

       Mr. Boddie obtained his information from the original list which was printed in the William and Mary College Quarterly
Historical Magazine, VII (1899), 217-218 which also lists the following as reprinted in New World Immigrants by Michael
Tepper, Vol. I, p.1:

       1625 - Total inhabitants of Virginia - 1,095
       Muster of the Inhabitants at Wariscoyack, Virginia, Taken 7 Feb 1625

       The Muster of Mr. Edward Bennett’s Servants.
              Henry Pinke came in the London Marchannt 1619, John Bate in the Addam 1621, Peter Collins in the Addam 1621,
Wassell Webbling, Antonio, a negro, in the James 1621, Christopher Reynold’s, Luke Chappman, Edward Maybank, in the
John & Francis 1622, John Attkins, William Denum, Francis Banks, in the Guifte 1623, Mary, a negro woman, in the Margrett
& John 1622 (Doc.#162a)

       This muster reveals that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., began residing in Warrosquyoake County within a year after arriving in
the Colony of Virginia. Since he was a servant or “employee” of Mr. Edward Bennett, who owned a large amount of land in
Warrosquyoake County, it appears he originally settled in the Warrosquyoake settlement which was located on the Pagan
River. Christopher Reynolds, Sr., or his family may have known Edward Bennett and resided in the same general area of
England prior to emigrating to Virginia as one of Mr. Bennett’s servants. Further research into the origins of Edward Bennett
and his servants may allow us to confirm Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s place of origin in England.

       The fact that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was listed in the 1625 military muster reveals that he survived the Indian attacks
on the Colonial Virginia settlements and was an active member of the Colonial Virginia militia in Warrosquyoake. Though no
documentation is provided, Robert A. Reynolds of the Reynolds Family Association lists that on 18 Mar 1625, Christopher
Reynolds appeared in General Court at Jamestown and swore that he, as secretary to Robert Bennett, had seen and read Peter
Collins' indenture and that it said that Collins was bound to serve Mr. Bennett for four years from 1621. Though there is no
reference to Christopher Reynolds as having been the secretary of Robert Bennett, Sybil “Lee” Taylor provides the following:

       13 Mar 1625/6, Minutes of the Council and General Court of Virginia, 2nd Edition, published in 1979, Richmond, Edited
by H.R. McIlwaine; Before the General Court at Jamestown, Virginia: "Christopher Reighnalls, sworne and examined sayeth
that he did see and read Peter Collins indenture and that he was bound to serve Mr. Bennett four years."

       Notice the spelling of Christopher’s name in this deposition: "Christopher Reighnalls, sworne and examined sayeth that he
did see and read Peter Collins indenture and that he was bound to serve Mr. Bennett four years." Notice that it is an unusual
spelling for the Reynolds surname which no doubt many previous researchers had not discovered.

       The above deposition indicates that at least some, possibly all of the servants of Edward Bennett’s tobacco plantation at
Warrosquyoake were indentured to him for a period of about four years in order to pay for their passage to Virginia and
provide employment once they arrived. No doubt Christopher Reynolds was also an indentured servant. According to the
1625 muster listed above which lists: “Peter Collins in the Addam 1621," Peter Collins immigrated to Virginia as an indentured
servant of Edward Bennett in 1621. Hence, Peter Collins would have fulfilled his indenture agreement in 1625, the same year
that Christopher Reynolds provided his deposition. This indicates that Christopher Reynolds’s deposition was in favor of Peter
Collins who appears to have recently completed his indentured service to Mr. Edward Bennett.

       Though some Reynolds family genealogists have interpreted the fact that Christopher Reynolds “...did see and read Peter
Collins indentures...” to indicate that he was the secretary to Mr. Bennett, Christopher Reynolds merely provided his testimony
in this deposition. As indicated above, this testimony appears to have been against Mr. Edward Bennett and in favor of Peter
Collins who appears to have recently completed his indentured service to Mr. Edward Bennett. There is no reference to
Christopher as having been the secretary to Mr. Bennett. There is also no reference to Christopher Reynolds traveling to
England with Mr. Bennett as his secretary to secure a monopoly in the tobacco trade as suggested by some Reynolds family
genealogists.

       However, it is interesting to note that according to this deposition, Christopher Reynolds appears to have been able to
read. This indicates that he received some education. If this was the same Christopher Reynolds who was born in 1611, i.e.
age twenty four when he transported nine servants to Virginia aboard the Speedwell in 1635, then he would have been age
fourteen or fifteen when he provided this deposition. Provided that Christopher Reynolds was also bound to Edward Bennett
for four years of indentured service, from the date of his original arrival in Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622,
Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant would have fulfilled his indentured service sometime in 1626/7. However, it is
possible that he was obligated for a period longer than four years.

       16 Mar 1634/5, Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. XVIII, Virginia Gleanings in England, p. 308;
Christopher Reynolds, son of George Reynolds deceased and brother of Anne Reynolds listed as kinsmen in will of Henry
Hobson of City of Bristol, Inn Holder (Doc.#173a-c)



Nottinghamshire: - Register of Marriages, 1559-1812
   Marriages at Mansfield, 1559 to 1812.
    Marriages at Mansfield, 1559 to 1812.
     Volume 2.
  County: Nottinghamshire
  Country: England
  Christopher Reynold & Anne Harryson 27 May 1684
=
  Nottinghamshire: - Register of Marriages, 1559-1812
   Marriages at Mansfield, 1559 to 1812.
    Marriages at Mansfield, 1559 to 1812.
     Volume 2.
  County: Nottinghamshire
  Country: England
  Christopher Reynold & Anne Milnes 20 Oct 1672
=
  Nottinghamshire: - Register of Marriages, 1559-1812
   Marriages at Mansfield, 1559 to 1812.
    Marriages at Mansfield, 1559 to 1812.
     Volume 1.
  County: Nottinghamshire
  Country: England
  John Price, vicar; John Butcher, Christopher Reynold, churchward.

===========
Essex, Hertfordshire: Chelmsford - Wills, 1620-1720
   Marriages at Curry Rivel, 1642 to 1812.
    Index To Wills Now Preserved In The Essex Record Office Chelmsford
     1620-1720
  County: Essex
  Country: England
  1627 Reynolds, Reynold, Kent als., Christopher, husb., Lindsell 231 MW 3
=
  Essex, Hertfordshire: Chelmsford - Wills, 1620-1720
   Marriages at Curry Rivel, 1642 to 1812.
    Index To Wills Now Preserved In The Essex Record Office Chelmsford
     1620-1720
  County: Essex
  Country: England
  1627 Kent, als. Reynold, Christopher, husb., Lindsell 231 MW 3
=======
Essex, Hertfordshire: Chelmsford - Wills, 1620-1720
   Marriages at Curry Rivel, 1642 to 1812.
    Index To Wills Now Preserved In The Essex Record Office Chelmsford
     1620-1720
  County: Hertfordshire
  Country: England
  1627 Reynolds, Reynold, Kent als., Christopher, husb., Lindsell 231 MW 3
=
  Essex, Hertfordshire: Chelmsford - Wills, 1620-1720
   Marriages at Curry Rivel, 1642 to 1812.
    Index To Wills Now Preserved In The Essex Record Office Chelmsford
     1620-1720
  County: Hertfordshire
  Country: England
  1627 Kent, als. Reynold, Christopher, husb., Lindsell 231 MW 3
====
Yorkshire: Doncaster - Registers of Marriages, 1557-1784
   Volume 1.
  County: Yorkshire
  Country: England
  Christopher Reynold & Jane Hodgson 26 Feb 1589



Nottinghamshire: - Register of Marriages, 1763-1813
   Marriages.
    Marriages at St. Mary's, Nottingham 1566 to 1813.
     Vol. 11.
  County: Nottinghamshire
  Country: England
  Christopher Reynolds & Mary Trout, lic. 27 Aug 1798
=
  Nottinghamshire: - Register of Marriages, 1559-1812
   Marriages at Mansfield, 1559 to 1812.
    Marriages at Mansfield, 1559 to 1812.
     Volume 4.
  County: Nottinghamshire
  Country: England
  Christopher Reynolds & Elizabeth Hinde, p. of Teversal 08 Apr 1751
=
  Nottinghamshire: - Register of Marriages, 1559-1812
   Marriages at Mansfield, 1559 to 1812.
    Marriages at Mansfield, 1559 to 1812.
     Volume 2.
  County: Nottinghamshire
  Country: England
  Christopher Reynolds & Grace Spiby 01 Jul 1706
=
  Nottinghamshire: - Abstracts of Marriage Licenses. 1: Archdeaconry Court, 1577-1700 2. Peculiar of Southwell,
  1588-1754
   Marriages.
    Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences Part 2 Peculiar Court of Southwell
     1673-4.
  County: Nottinghamshire
  Country: England
  08 Jan 1673-4. Christopher Reynolds, of Nottm., & Mary, d. of Thomas Butcher, of Bolsover, co. Derby.

========
Essex, Hertfordshire: Chelmsford - Wills, 1620-1720
   Marriages at Curry Rivel, 1642 to 1812.
    Index To Wills Now Preserved In The Essex Record Office Chelmsford
     1620-1720
  County: Essex
  Country: England
  1632 Reynolds, Christopher, labourer, South Weald 134 EW 19
=
  Essex: - Registers of Marriages, 1559-1837
   Marriages at Curry Rivel, 1642 to 1812.
    Marriages at Roxwell, 1559 to 1837.
     Volume 1.
  County: Essex
  Country: England
  Christopher Reynolds & Mary Harvey 12 Nov 1627
=
  Essex, Hertfordshire: Chelmsford - Wills, 1620-1720
   Marriages at Curry Rivel, 1642 to 1812.
    Index To Wills Now Preserved In The Essex Record Office Chelmsford
     1620-1720
  County: Essex
  Country: England
  1691 Reynolds, Christopher, edgetool smith, Woodham Ferrers 459 BR 12
==
Essex, Hertfordshire: Chelmsford - Wills, 1620-1720
   Marriages at Curry Rivel, 1642 to 1812.
    Index To Wills Now Preserved In The Essex Record Office Chelmsford
     1620-1720
  County: Hertfordshire
  Country: England
  1691 Reynolds, Christopher, edgetool smith, Woodham Ferrers 459 BR 12
 
 
 

  Essex, Hertfordshire: Chelmsford - Wills, 1620-1720
   Marriages at Curry Rivel, 1642 to 1812.
    Index To Wills Now Preserved In The Essex Record Office Chelmsford
     1620-1720
  County: Hertfordshire
  Country: England
  1632 Reynolds, Christopher, labourer, South Weald 134 EW 19
=====
London: St. Dionis Backchurch - Parish Register (City of London), for Maryages, Christenynges, and Buryalles
   Book 25
    The Reiester booke of Saynte De'nis Bark: church parishe ffor Maryages Christenynges And Buryalles begynnynge in the yeare of
  or Lord God 1538 And is debyded into thre partes that ys ffyrst maryages Seconde Christenynges And the thyrde buryalles And
  begynnynge in the yeare before sayde & in Octobre.
     Christenings Since John Smith was Parish Clerk.
  County: London
  Country: England
  25 Jun 1682 Christopher Reynolds, son of Anthony & Ann Reynolds
 
 
 

  London: St. Mildred (Bread Street) & St. Margaret Moses - Parish Registers, 1558 - 1853
   Baptisms.
    Baptisms.
     Register 1.
  County: London
  Country: England
  17 Nov 1698 Ebenezer of ye age of 8 years & Mary of ye age of 7, son & daughter of Christopher & Sarah Reynolds of ye Parish
  of St Saviours, Southwarke, being Anabaptist, were Bapt. 17 Nov 1698 , being brought by yr Kinsman Mr Shaw
==========
Devon & Cornwall: - Wills and Administrations proved in the Bishop of Exeter, 1559-1799
   Burials.
    Court of the Archdeaconry of Exeter.
     1754.
  County: Devonshire
  Country: England
  Reynolds, Christopher, Colompton A., W. 1754
==
Shropshire: Worthen - Parish Registers, Hereford Diocese
   Mensis Septembris
    Mensis Septembris
     In the year of our Ld. Gd. 1733-4
  County: Shropshire
  Country: England
  04 Jan 1734-5 Mabel, d. of John Christopher Reynolds & Elizabeth bap.


Virginia County Records, VI
 Index to Land Grants Isle of Wight County
  Book No. 4.

Original Source Page Name: 243 Christopher Reynolds 1657
Comment: 350 acres 

Virginia County Records, VI
 Index to Land Grants Isle of Wight County
  Book No. 6.

Original Source Page Name: 684 Richard Reynolds 1679
Comment: 566 acres 

Virginia County Records, VI
 Isle of Wight County
  Book No. 7.

Original Source Page Name: 71 Richard Reynolds Sr. 1681
Comment: 380 acres 

Virginia County Records, VI
 Isle of Wight County
  Book No. 7.

Original Source Page Name: 174 Richard Reynolds 1682
Comment: 450 acres 



FROM ED HUDSON
DEC 7, 2002
More...
This one contains the names of all seven people "transported by Christopher Reynolds" in 1657.

"We also have an early reference to a John Beckham who also appears to have been an indentured servant.  On 25 November 1657 in Isle of Wright County, Virginia a man by the name of Christopher Reynolds traded 7 servants namely:  John Becham, Joseph Kerby, John Moode, William Seller, Edmond Howsden, Margaret Langridge, and Susan Stubbers for 350 acres of land along Cyprus Creek. "
 

The cite is:   http://www.idcity.com/beckham_book/beckham_A_4.htm

-Ed Hudson
=======
Found this on the web:

On 25 Nov 1657 John Becham, an indentured servant, was traded by Christopher Reynolds in Isle of Wight Co., VA, along with six other servants for 350 acres of land along Cyprus Creek.

Contained in:
         http://www.rootsweb.com/~momaries/pvj.htm

I assume our William Sellers was one of the other six...

-Ed Hudson



dec 7, 2002
ED, thanks.
can you get us the description of an INDENTURED SERVANT in 1657 =

I kinda thought you were Bound to this person for 7 YEARS?
And maybe I am thinking of the 7 years you were committed to PA when you came on a SHIP?

OR is this the SAME Christopher REYNOLDS connected to our WM SELLER?

I believe they have proven another CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS?
MAYBE a diff JOHN BECHAM?
(Same dates? NEED copies of Original info)

BUT, if you died and son, etc was heir? what would happen= a possibility also.

PLEASE understand my questions - I APPRECIATE your info.
marie, iowa



dec 3, 2002
EHUDSONIII@aol.com
The following was copied from "The Descendants of Christopher Reynolds", a genealogy chart on the internet.

     " There was a second arrival in VA of Christopher Reynolds aged 24 aboard the ship 'Speedwell' which departed from England 28 May 1635 [RFACC p 419] On 15 Sep 1636- Christopher entered a patent for transporting nine people on the ship "Speedwell".  He obtained a headright(patent) on these people for 450 acres in Warrisquick(sic) Co. bounded with a back creek and running eastward behind the Pagan Shore some three miles upward, Patent Bk 1 page 382.

    "Christopher along with his neighbor Richard Bennett was elected to the House of Burgesses on 30 Apr 1652 from Isle of Wight Co, VA. " [RFACC p 419]

As usual, everything I find creates more questions than answers. Now I'm wondering if our William Sellers was transported from England in 1637 rather than 1657. This, of course, would make him twenty years older than we previously thought.

-Ed Hudson



DEC  4, 2002
The document containing all the Christopher Reynolds information can be viewed at:
        http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fww64/creynolds.html
There are other sites as well, but this is the one I was referring to.
-Ed Hudson
EHUDSONIII@aol.com


DEC 4, 2002
ED, thanks. this is the same person that wrote the articles I copied, but, I
didn't save the url or date! = very important, they may have updated info!
but it was  isle of wight, va.
=
In regards to the ancestry of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant,
there are other theories which have been proposed.
These theories have been compiled by Sybil R. "Lee" Taylor of the Reynolds
Family Association:
===
I just haven't taken time to study = which we need to do.
Also, need to collect BENNETT/NORSWORTHY/BAGGETT/CHITTY/MOORE info that JOHN
SELLERS ca1665  lived   close to in 1714. when we sold land and went WHERE?
AND where is this JOHN SELLERS after 1714/1722?

other counties made from this land is very important and SELLERS are where =

THANKS for sharing and collecting info, it is Needed!
marie, i owa



ISLE OF WIGHT, VA genweb page =
BY =
In regards to the ancestry of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, there are other theories which have been proposed.
These theories have been compiled by Sybil R. “Lee” Taylor of the Reynolds Family Association:

       We have no conclusive proof of the parents of Christopher, and at least two other writers disagreed with Col. Tillman.
J.R.B. Hathaway, in 1901, stated in The North Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol II, No 4, Oct 1901
[Reprinted - Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1979, pp135-136] "Parker Family," that Christopher was the brother of
Cecily, and the son of Thomas Reynolds: "The grandfather of Cicely Reynolds was Thomas Jordan, of Dorsetshire, England,
grand daughter (sic), the mother of Cicely married a Reynolds. Her mother's maiden name was Cicely Fitzpen or Phippen, and
she was the daughter of Robert Phippen and his wife Cicely or Cicellie Jordan. Robert Phippen was the son of one Joseph
Phippen, whose mother was Alice Pierce, and thus Ciceley Reynolds was related to Capt. William Pierce and his wife Joane...
Twelve years later, her brother, Christopher Reynolds, arrived on the 'John and Francis'...."

       In 1978, William Glasgow Reynolds privately published The Reynolds History Annotated (1475-1977), in which he sided
with Judge Ray. Reynolds identified the father of Christopher as Thomas Reynolds b. ca 1594 who married Cecily Phippen b.
1575 in Dorsetshire, England. "Christopher Reynolds was the son of Thomas Reynolds [Ray Index, p.135] born 1604 in
Dorsetshire, England, and died 1654 (Isle of Wight) Virginia; married 1639 Mrs. Elizabeth (Matthews) Rivers relict of George
Rivers and daughter of Anthony Matthews. Worth S. Ray, in Index to Hathaway's NC Historical & Genealogical Register p.
135, states "Christopher Reynolds was born in Dorsetshire, England, although Tillman takes a contrary position that it was
County Kent, England. Boddie in Historical Southern Families, Vol II, 'Reynolds of Isle of Wight,' p. 201, seems to agree with
Judge Ray."

       Unfortunately, none of these writers provided sources for their information. It doesn't seem likely that Thomas and Cecily
could be the father of Christopher and Cecily. Please refer in this book to the article about "Cecily ?Reynolds? of Virginia" for a
discussion of this parentage. To date, no record has been found that clearly relates Christopher of Isle of Wight to Christopher
of County Kent, nor to Thomas and Cecily.

       In addition to the above, an article on Cicely Jordan also appeared in the Virginia Historical Magazine of History and
Biography as represented here by Sybill “Lee” Taylor of the Reynolds Family Association:

              LINKS IN A CHAIN
              by James P.C. Southall in
              The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography
              Vol. LI, No. 4, October 1943
              Pages 383-386

       James P.C. Southall, in "Links In A Chain," wrote of Samuel Jordan and Cicely his wife, and substantiates the information
in the foregoing except for Cecily's ancestry. He agrees that Temperance Baley and Mary and Margaret Jordan were Cicely's
daughters.

              "...it is to be inferred that Mrs. Cicely Jordan was born in 1601 and was therefore a year younger than Samuel
Jordan's eldest son. In other words, widower Samuel Jordan who married widow Cicely about 1 December 1620 was old
enough to be her father. Whereas the Muster reports that Cicely came to Virginia in the 'Swan' in 1610, we are led to infer
from Samuel Jordan's patent that the year was 1611. The latter is evidently correct, for the 'Swan,' the 'Tryall' and the 'Noah'
were the three ships of Sir Thomas Gates's fleet which reached Jamestown towards the end of August 1611. Others who came
in the 'Swan' with ten-year old Cicely were: Richard Biggs, 41 years old, Thomas Boulding, John Fludd, Gent., Thomas
Garnett, servant of Captain William Powell, Lieut. Albiano Lupo, Gent., 40 years old, Thomas Stepney, 35 years old, John
Taylor, 37 years old, and Amyle Wayne, 30 years old. Incidentally, Elizabeth Dunthorne, 38 years old, wife of Thomas
Dunthorne, Robert Greenleafe, and John Sleight came in the 'Noah,' and Henry Coltman in the 'Tryal,' all at the same time.
Lady Gates and her two daughters had accompanied Sir Thomas Gates on this voyage, but Lady Gates died in the West Indies
without ever reaching Virginia. Whether any of the individuals above mentioned was related to our Cicely, who were her
parents or guardians, and what was her own name, are questions that cannot be answered. Just as the burden of the famous
song in the Two Gentlemen of Verona was, Who is Sylvia? so here we ask, but ask in vain, Who was Cicely?"

       Southall's references: 19 Nugent, introductory pages et seq , pp. 5, 6, 21, 25, 34 [all relative to the names of persons on
the three ships; and 50 V 77.

       [1] Peter Wilson Coldham, The Complete Book of Emigrants 1607-1660, A Comprehensive Listing Compiled from
English Public Records, p. 35-46: 16 Feb 1624. List of the names of the living in Virginia and of those who have died since
April 1623 from PRO:CO1/3/5 (Public Record Office, Kew, Richmond, Surry TW9 4DU, England): At Jordan's Journey.
Living: Sislye Jordan; Temperance Bailey; Mary Jordan; Margery Jordan; William Farrar...

       Though this information appears to have been properly documented, further research is required in order to verify the
connection between Cicely Jordan and Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. Notice that Cicely’s maiden name is not listed
in the above records. Hence, the original records should be searched in order to verify that her maiden name was Reynolds.
Notice also that there was a Richard Biggs who arrived with this group of immigrants including the ten year old Cecily aboard
the Swan at Jamestown in August 1611. This corresponds with the fact that there was also an eleven year old girl named
Elizabeth Biggs and a six month old child named Phillip Biggs who were among the nine servants transported to Virginia aboard
the Speedwell in 1635 by “Chri: Reinhold” (Doc.#161a). This “Chri: Reinhold” appears to have been the same person as
Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant as listed below. The Biggs family also appears fairly frequently in the Isle of Wight
County records as listed below in this report.

       In his book entitled The Reynolds Family Annotated, attorney William Glasgow Reynolds lists that Cecily Jordan was the
older sister of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. The author further claims that Cecily came to Jamestown, Virginia
aboard the ship Swan which arrived in August 1610. She married first to Thomas Bailey and had a daughter named
Temperance Bailey who was born in 1616. After Thomas Bailey died from malaria, Cecily married secondly to Samuel Jordan,
a cousin of her mother. After Samuel Jordan died, she married William Farrar who died in 1635. Cecily married twice after the
death of William Farrar; Peter Montague who died in 1659 by whom she had seven children during their twenty three years of
marriage; Thomas Parker by whom their were no heirs (Doc.#194a-d). As listed above, a copy of The Reynolds Family
Annotated, by attorney William Glasgow Reynolds was provided to us by Sybil “Lee” Taylor who retyped the entire text and
then emailed us this book chapter by chapter including endnotes. Though this book was well written, it does not appear to
properly document the actual source materials, i.e. the endnotes are not connected with the text. There are no superscripts in
the text which refer to the endnotes. Though we do not have access to the original publication, it was filed with the Library of
Congress card number: 78-61854. According to Lee Taylor, William Glasgow Reynolds was an original founder of the
Reynolds Family Association.

       Sybil “Lee” Taylor of the Reynolds Family Association also provides the following in regards to the
Warrosquyoake/Waresquoack massacre which occurred about the same time period in which Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the
immigrant arrived in Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622:

       22 Mar 1621, At [Edward] Bennett's Plantation only 86 of the scheduled settlers had arrived at the time of the
Waresquoack massacre (the Good Friday massacre, 22 March 1621-22); 33 survivors managed to drive off the attackers
[Boddie 17th Century Isle of Wight County Virginia, pp. 35-6]. Robert Bennett and his new secretary, Christopher Reynolds,
were among them [W.G. Reynolds]. By RFA [Reynolds Family Association] member Robert A. Reynolds, Roselle, New
Jersey (obtained from Sybil “Lee” Taylor of the Reynolds Family Association)

       This is interesting information which appears to correspond with the above records. However the statement that
Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, was the “new secretary” for Robert Bennett is not documented other than the
reference to “W.G. Reynolds” which stands for William Glasgow Reynolds’s book entitled “The Reynolds Family Annotated,”
which was copyrighted in 1978. A copy of this book was provided to us by Sybil “Lee” Taylor who retyped the entire text and
then emailed us this book chapter by chapter including endnotes. Though this book was well written, it does not appear to
properly document the actual source materials, i.e. the endnotes are connected with the text. There are no superscripts in the
text which refer to the endnotes. Though we do not have access to the original publication, according to Sybil “Lee” Taylor, it
was filed with the Library of Congress card number: 78-61854. According to some historians of Isle of Wight County, Robert
Bennett was a brother or nephew of Edward Bennett who was in charge of Edward Bennett’s Isle of Wight plantation in
Colonial Virginia. Robert A. Reynolds of the Reynolds Family Association lists the following in regards to the Warrosquyoake
massacre:

       19 Apr 1622, Gov. Francis Wyatt ordered Capt. Ralph Hamor to bring the survivors to Jamestown Island for their safety
[Records of the Virginia Company of London, III, part ii, p. 50a]. On 7 Oct 1622, Edward Bennett of the plantation of
Warascoake requested that his people might be returned thereto [Records of the Virginia Company Vol. II, pp. 104-5.]

       Christopher Reynolds' name appears on a post-massacre muster of living inhabitants at Waresquoack taken 16 Feb 1623.
[List of names of persons living in Virginia, 16 Feb 1623, set forth in Hotten Lists of Emigrants to America 16--1700, p. 169 et
seq. Christopher Reynolds name appears on page 181 as a survivor at Warwick Squrake [Records of the Virginia Company
of London, III, par ii, p. 50a]. Waresquoack Plantation was located in the vicinity of present day Smithfield, Virginia].

       The above information, which appears to be properly documented, corresponds with the following which was published in
the history entitled Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, an abstract of which reads as
follows:

 16 Feb 1623, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 37, Chr. Reinholds [Christopher
Reynolds] was among 33 inhabitants listed in a census for Warrascoyack [Warrosquyoake County], Virginia (Doc.#131v):

       John Batt, Henry Pinffe, Wassell Weblin, Anthony Read, Frances Woodson, Henry Phillips, Peter Collins, Chr. Reinold’s,
Edward Mabin, John Maldman, Thomas Collins, George Rushmore, Thomas Spencer, George Clarke, Rich. Bartlett, Frances
Anthony, Franse, Margrett, negroes; John Bennett, Nicholas Skinner, John Atkins, John Pollentin, Margrett Pollentin, Mary, a
maid, Henry Woodward, Thomas Sawyer, Thomas, a boye. Total 33, including 4 negroes (Doc.#131v,169a)

       Notice that there is a boy named Thomas listed in this 1623 census for Warrosquyoake County, Virginia. However,
Christopher Reynolds, Sr.,who is listed as “Chr. Reinold ” in this census, is not listed as a boy even though he would have been
only thirteen years old if he was born in 1610 as indicated by his age in the passenger ship list for the Speedwell which arrived
in Virginia in 1635 as listed below. However, the term “boye” as it used above appears to refer to a “Negro boy” named
Thomas. Notice that no surname was listed for this Negro boy. This corresponds with the listing of the other three Negroes
named Franse, Margrett and Mary the maid, none of whom are listed with surnames. The fact that this census lists all
inhabitants indicates that it was not concerned with either the age or the color of the inhabitants, i.e. all inhabitants were listed
regardless of age or race.

       7 Feb 1624, The Original Lists of Person of Quality by John Camden Hotten, p. 241; Christopher Reynolds' is listed in a
muster of Edward Bennett’s servants in Wariscoyacke. There were twelve servants, two of whom were Negroes. Similar to
the 1623 census, this muster lists that Christopher Reynolds immigrated to Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622
(Doc.#189a)

       Notice that this information is not listed in the history entitled Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John
B. Boddie.       In comparison with the twelve servants listed in 1624, notice that in the previous year in 1623, that there were
thirty three inhabitants residing in the Warrosquyoake settlement. In just one year the number of Edward Bennett’s servants
decreased by twenty one, apparently due to the Indian attacks on the new settlement.

       Robert A. Reynolds, a member of the Reynolds Family Association lists the following: “Shortly after the 1624 muster, the
Virginia Council dispatched Edward Bennett to London to seek a Colonial monopoly for Virginia in the tobacco trade with
England. Christopher accompanied him and remained as his secretary during the time it took Mr. Bennett to secure the
monopoly [W.G. Reynolds: Boddie, 17th Century Isle of Wight County Virginia, p. 38].” Though the information about
dispatching Edward Bennett to England corresponds with the reference to Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia,
by John B. Boddie, pp. 36-38, nowhere in that history does it list Christopher Reynolds as the secretary of Edward Bennett.

       25 Feb 1625, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 37, Christopher Reynolds listed
in a muster of the inhabitants of Wariscoyack [Warrosquyoake County], Virginia, who were servants of Mr. Edward Bennett
(Doc.#131v)

       Mr. Boddie obtained his information from the original list which was printed in the William and Mary College Quarterly
Historical Magazine, VII (1899), 217-218 which also lists the following as reprinted in New World Immigrants by Michael
Tepper, Vol. I, p.1:

       1625 - Total inhabitants of Virginia - 1,095
       Muster of the Inhabitants at Wariscoyack, Virginia, Taken 7 Feb 1625

       The Muster of Mr. Edward Bennett’s Servants.
              Henry Pinke came in the London Marchannt 1619, John Bate in the Addam 1621, Peter Collins in the Addam 1621,
Wassell Webbling, Antonio, a negro, in the James 1621, Christopher Reynold’s, Luke Chappman, Edward Maybank, in the
John & Francis 1622, John Attkins, William Denum, Francis Banks, in the Guifte 1623, Mary, a negro woman, in the Margrett
& John 1622 (Doc.#162a)

       This muster reveals that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., began residing in Warrosquyoake County within a year after arriving in
the Colony of Virginia. Since he was a servant or “employee” of Mr. Edward Bennett, who owned a large amount of land in
Warrosquyoake County, it appears he originally settled in the Warrosquyoake settlement which was located on the Pagan
River. Christopher Reynolds, Sr., or his family may have known Edward Bennett and resided in the same general area of
England prior to emigrating to Virginia as one of Mr. Bennett’s servants. Further research into the origins of Edward Bennett
and his servants may allow us to confirm Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s place of origin in England.

       The fact that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was listed in the 1625 military muster reveals that he survived the Indian attacks
on the Colonial Virginia settlements and was an active member of the Colonial Virginia militia in Warrosquyoake. Though no
documentation is provided, Robert A. Reynolds of the Reynolds Family Association lists that on 18 Mar 1625, Christopher
Reynolds appeared in General Court at Jamestown and swore that he, as secretary to Robert Bennett, had seen and read Peter
Collins' indenture and that it said that Collins was bound to serve Mr. Bennett for four years from 1621. Though there is no
reference to Christopher Reynolds as having been the secretary of Robert Bennett, Sybil “Lee” Taylor provides the following:

       13 Mar 1625/6, Minutes of the Council and General Court of Virginia, 2nd Edition, published in 1979, Richmond, Edited
by H.R. McIlwaine; Before the General Court at Jamestown, Virginia: "Christopher Reighnalls, sworne and examined sayeth
that he did see and read Peter Collins indenture and that he was bound to serve Mr. Bennett four years."

       Notice the spelling of Christopher’s name in this deposition: "Christopher Reighnalls, sworne and examined sayeth that he
did see and read Peter Collins indenture and that he was bound to serve Mr. Bennett four years." Notice that it is an unusual
spelling for the Reynolds surname which no doubt many previous researchers had not discovered.

       The above deposition indicates that at least some, possibly all of the servants of Edward Bennett’s tobacco plantation at
Warrosquyoake were indentured to him for a period of about four years in order to pay for their passage to Virginia and
provide employment once they arrived. No doubt Christopher Reynolds was also an indentured servant. According to the
1625 muster listed above which lists: “Peter Collins in the Addam 1621," Peter Collins immigrated to Virginia as an indentured
servant of Edward Bennett in 1621. Hence, Peter Collins would have fulfilled his indenture agreement in 1625, the same year
that Christopher Reynolds provided his deposition. This indicates that Christopher Reynolds’s deposition was in favor of Peter
Collins who appears to have recently completed his indentured service to Mr. Edward Bennett.

       Though some Reynolds family genealogists have interpreted the fact that Christopher Reynolds “...did see and read Peter
Collins indentures...” to indicate that he was the secretary to Mr. Bennett, Christopher Reynolds merely provided his testimony
in this deposition. As indicated above, this testimony appears to have been against Mr. Edward Bennett and in favor of Peter
Collins who appears to have recently completed his indentured service to Mr. Edward Bennett. There is no reference to
Christopher as having been the secretary to Mr. Bennett. There is also no reference to Christopher Reynolds traveling to
England with Mr. Bennett as his secretary to secure a monopoly in the tobacco trade as suggested by some Reynolds family
genealogists.

       However, it is interesting to note that according to this deposition, Christopher Reynolds appears to have been able to
read. This indicates that he received some education. If this was the same Christopher Reynolds who was born in 1611, i.e.
age twenty four when he transported nine servants to Virginia aboard the Speedwell in 1635, then he would have been age
fourteen or fifteen when he provided this deposition. Provided that Christopher Reynolds was also bound to Edward Bennett
for four years of indentured service, from the date of his original arrival in Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622,
Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant would have fulfilled his indentured service sometime in 1626/7. However, it is
possible that he was obligated for a period longer than four years.

       16 Mar 1634/5, Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. XVIII, Virginia Gleanings in England, p. 308;
Christopher Reynolds, son of George Reynolds deceased and brother of Anne Reynolds listed as kinsmen in will of Henry
Hobson of City of Bristol, Inn Holder (Doc.#173a-c)

       According to the notes accompanying the publication of this will, Henry Hobson was a Mayor of Bristol, England. His
grandson, Miles Cary, was the emigrant to Virginia. Though there is no direct connection to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the
immigrant of Isle of Wight County, listed in this will, the name pattern of a Christopher Reynolds listed as the son of George
Reynolds is intriguing when compared with the information on the Reynolds families of Gravesend in County Kent and London.
Hence, additional research could be conducted in the records of Bristol in order to ascertain if there is a connection between
Christopher Reynolds, Sr., of Isle of Wight and the Reynolds families of Bristol.

       21 Dec 1634, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 531, Isle of Wight County
Deeds, Bk. A, p.103; Christopher Reynolds of Warwickqueak [Warrosquyoake County] obtained 100 acre patent from
Robert Sabine of Warrisquick [Warrosquyoake County] Bay, Witnesses: Robert Cramporne and Thomas Coarkman (as
shown in the deed of Wassell Webling and George Fawdon from Justinian Cooper and wife) (Doc.#131ac, 135b)

       This is the first record of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., obtaining land in Virginia. From the year of Christopher Reynolds,
Sr.’s arrival in Virginia in 1622, it was twelve years later in 1634 before he purchased land. This information and the
information above appears to confirm that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, was an indentured servant of Mr. Edward
Bennett. This also appears to support the theory that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., originally immigrated to Colonial Virginia as an
eleven year old child, who was possibly an orphan, in 1622. As listed below, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant appears
to have sold this land five years later: 1 May 1639, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. A, p.103; Christopher Reynolds sold 100
acre patent in Warrisquack [Warwicke Squeake or Warrosquyoake] Bay to Peter Hull [Hill], Witnesses: John Spackman and
John Oliver (Doc.#131ac, 135b). In a patent issued to John Mungoe (Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 7, p. 417), dated 21
Oct 1684 which is listed below, it lists that this 100 hundred acres which Robert Sabine originally sold to Christopher Reynolds
on 21 Dec 1634, was located on the south side of Hutchinson’s Creek: 21 Oct 1684, Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 4, p.
417; Christopher Reynolds of Isle of Wight County, Virginia listed as having bought land from Robert Sabine on 21 Dec 1634,
100 acres located on the south side of Hutchison’s Creek, which Christopher Reynolds then sold to Peter Hill/Hull on 1 May
1639.

       According to John Camden Hotten’s list of immigrants aboard the Speedwell, which arrived in 1635, there is a listing for
“Chris. Reinhold, 24," which could have been the same individual as Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who arrived in 1622 aboard
the John & Francis as listed above. Richard Reynolds, a Reynolds family genealogist, has proposed that Christopher Reynolds,
Sr., returned to England and then brought nine servants back to Virginia. The following is a transcription of the original ship
manifest and passenger ship list for the Speedwell:

       28 May 1635
              Theis under-written names are to be transported to Virginia imbarqued in the Speedwell of London JO: Chappell Mr:
being examined by the Minister of Gravesend of their conformitie to the orders & discipline of the Church of England & have
taken the oath of Allegeance.

       [Chri: Reinolds group]
       Kathryn Richard’s...19
       Marie Sedgwick.....20
       Elizabeth Biggs......10
       Dorothie Wyncott..40
       Ann Wyncott..........16
       Phillipp Biggs.........6 mo.
       Elizabeth Pew.........20
       Francis Langworth..25
       Chri: Reinholds.......24
       Abram Poore..........20
       Elizabeth Tuttell.....25
       (Doc.#161a)

       It is interesting to note that the majority of these passengers were woman, most of them in their early twenties. The only
two males are listed as Christopher Reinholds/Reynolds and a six month old child named Phillipp Biggs. Phillip may have been
the younger brother of Elizabeth Biggs, age ten, both of whom appear to have been orphans. As indicated throughout this
report, the Biggs families resided in the same area as the Reynolds families in Isle of Wight County. The majority of these
passengers aboard the Speedwell appear to have been brought to Virginia in order to provide wives to the men of the
Warrosquyoake settlement. Notice that three of these females were named Elizabeth, i.e. the same given name listed as the wife
of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., in his will dated 1654 which is listed below. Hence, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., may have married
one of these female passengers named Elizabeth.

       In contrast to the information from the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster by Col. Steve F. Tillman and others, who have
calculated that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, as having been born in 1611 in Gravesend, County Kent, England,
Sybil “Lee” Taylor lists the following: “Col. Tillman stated that Christopher was born in 1611, but this does not seem probable
since he appeared as a witness in court in 1625, when he would have been only 14 years of age. Before the General Court held
at Jamestown 13 Mar 1625, "Christopher Reighnalls, sworne and examined sayeth that he did see and read Peter Collins
indenture and that he was bound to serve Mr. Bennett four years." It is shown in Edward Bennett's muster of 1625 that Peter
Collins came over on the "Adams" in 1621.”

       The theory that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, was born in 1611, is apparently based on the listing of Chris:
Reinhold as having been age twenty four in 1635as listed on the passenger list for the Speedwell. If Christopher Reynolds, Sr.,
was the same individual as the Chris. Reinhold, age 24, who arrived aboard the Speedwell in 1635, he would have been only
eleven years old when he arrived in Colonial Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622. Though this seems unlikely since
Christopher Reynolds, Sr., is listed the following year in the 1623 census as one of the thirty three original residents of
Warrosquyoake County, notice that the 1623 census, which is listed above, lists children as well as adults. Though censuses
usually refer to tithables, i.e. white persons above age twenty one years of age, that was not the case in these colonial Isle of
Wight census and muster rolls. Hence, it is possible that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who arrived in Colonial Virginia in 1622
aboard the John & Francis, is the same person as “Chris: Reinhold, age 24,” who arrived in America in 1635 aboard the
Speedwell with the nine other persons. Notice that the time period in which “Chri: Reinhold” and his group of nine
servants/persons arrived in Virginia in 1635 aboard the Speedwell corresponds with the 450 acre patent that Christopher
Reynolds, Sr., received the following year in Warrosquyoake County “for transporting nine servants” as listed below.

       In 1636, Christopher Reynolds obtained a 450 acre patent on the waters of Pagan Shore for transporting nine servants to
the Virginia Colony:

15 Sep 1636, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 659; The Library of Virginia,
Virginia Land Office Patents No. 1, 1623-1643, p.382; Christopher Reynolds obtained a 450 acre patent “bounded with a
back creek running eastward behind Pagan Shore some three miles upward, the land lying on the south side of the creek in
Warrasquinoke [Warrosquyoake ] County for transporting 9 servants. (Doc.# 131w,131ay, 142h)

       Warrasquinoke, also listed as Warrasquoyacke or Warrosquyoake, was a Colonial Virginia County which was originally
formed in 1634. In 1637, the name was changed to Isle of Wight County. The article entitled Christopher Reynolds of Isle of
Wight, Virginia, published by The Reynolds Family Association lists that Christopher Reynolds was born in 1611 at Gravesend,
Kent County, England. The source of this birth year and place appears to have been the passenger list for the Speedwell which
arrived in 1635 as listed above. Though the article further lists that they settled in “Warwick County, Virginia” (Doc.#144e-h),
the records listed above reveal that Christopher Reynolds, Sr. was among the thirty three original inhabitants listed in a census
for Warrascoyack [Warrosquyoake County], Virginia on 16 Feb 1623(Doc.#131v). Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s first
purchase of land there occurred almost nine years later for 100 acres in Warrisquick [Warrosquyoake] Bay in 1634 in the
newly formed Warrosquyoake County. On 15 Sep 1636, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., obtained a 450 acre patent on the waters
of Pagan Shore or Pagan Creek in Warrosquyoake County which subsequently became Isle of Wight County in 1637. This
information confirms that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., originally settled in Mr. Edward Bennet’s Warrosquyoake Bay settlement
in Warrosquyoake County, not in Warrick [River] County.

       The fact that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was responsible for transporting nine servants to Virginia indicates that he was a
successful tobacco planter of Colonial Virginia. As were most individuals who resided in Colonial Virginia, Christopher
Reynolds, Sr.’s will and the deeds listed below confirm that he was a prosperous tobacco planter. As was the custom in
Colonial Virginia, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., received the above patent for 450 acres as compensation for bringing nine
servants to the rapidly growing tobacco economy in the Colony of Virginia.

       23 Dec 1636, Virginia Land Office, Patent Bk. 1, 1623-1643, p. 408; Nicholas Reynolds obtained a patent for 1000
acres lying at Lawnes Creek S.S. Et. up Lawnes Creeke (Doc.#156)

       As revealed below, this Nicholas Reynolds inhabited James City County which in Colonial time periods bounded the
northern border of Isle of Wight County. James City County was an original shire/county of Virginia which was formed in
1634. In 1652, James City County changed it’s name to Surry County. According to several genealogical data bases (including
the Ancestral File) and Reynolds family histories, there was a Richard Reynolds and his wife, Mary Anderson, who resided in
Surry County during the colonial time period. However, no sources of information are listed for these data bases regarding the
Richard Reynolds and Mary Anderson of Surry County. There are however, references to the will and children of Robert
Reynolds whose will was proved 2 Mar 1702 as listed below. James Reynolds’s will lists that he had a son named Robert and
a grandson named Nicholas. Hence, name and residence patterns indicate that James Reynolds was the son of Nicholas
Reynolds who first settled in James City County. Though the county location for the 1636 patent for Nicholas Reynolds was
not provided in the original description of the patent, the description does list Lawnes Creek which corresponds with the
northern boundary for the Upper Parish in Isle of Wight County as follows: “In March, 1643, by an Act of the General
Assembly, Isle of Wight County was divided into two parishes: “The upper parish to extend from Lawnes Creek to the eastern
side of the Bay, the creeke devideing the plantation of Sam. Davis and Joseph Cobbs to be the extant and division of the said
upper parish: The lower parish to extend from the Pagan-Poynt upon the river side to the plantation of Rich. Hayes, from the
Pagan-Poynt upon the bay including all the southerly side to the plantation of the said Cobbs, and that all the inhabitants
alreadie resideing or that hereafter shall reside on that side to belong to the said lower parish.” (Doc.#154c-d)

       As indicated above, this parish history confirms that Nicholas Reynolds settled in the same general area as Christopher
Reynolds, Sr., who resided in the adjoining Lower Parish. However, these were large parishes during this time period, nearly
sixty miles in length. Aside from this patent, Nicholas Reynolds also obtained two other patents in the years 1637 and 1638 as
listed below. According to Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, there was also a Nicholas Reynolds who was
transported to Virginia in 1642 by Hugh Gwyn, Gentleman (Doc.#21a). Though no county is listed in connection with this latter
record for Nicholas Reynolds, he immigrated five years after the Nicholas Reynolds of James City County first obtained land
there.

       1637, Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, p. 276; Richard Reynolds was transported to New Norfolk
County by James Knott (Doc.#21a)

       According to the publication entitled Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, who was clerk of the Virginia
State Land Office, there were several individuals named Reynolds/Reynolls who were transported to Colonial Virginia as
servants in the mid 1600's. The author of this publication appears to have extracted the names of these indentured servants
from the land patents and transportation records which were used to issue the original land patents and headrights to the
individuals who were responsible for transporting these servants to Virginia. This publication lists these immigrants and
indentured servants with the individual who was responsible for their transportation as well as the county to where they were
transported. Several were transported to Charles River and Charles City Counties. There were also three Richard Reynolds
who were transported to: New Norfolk County in 1637 as listed above; to Charles City County in 1638; and to Virginia, no
county listed, in 1652. William Reynolds was the only immigrant/indentured servant listed who was transported to Isle of Wight
County. He was transported in 1648 by John Seward (Doc.#21a). Interestingly, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant is
not listed among them and only William Reynolds was transported to Isle of Wight County.

       10 Feb 1637, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 664; The Library of Virginia,
Virginia Land Office Patents No. 1, 1623-1643, p.517; Christopher Reynolds listed as a land owner bounding a patent for
350 acres lying behind the Pagan Shore issued to Charles Barcroft (Doc.#131az, 142b)

       As indicated above, the Pagan Shore referred to in this land patent appears to refer to that portion of the Pagan River
where it is joined by the Cypress Creek tributary in the area of modern day Smithfield Town (Map-Doc.#160). According to
the following deeds, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his descendants occupied this property for several generations.

       26 Aug 1637, Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 1, p. 473; Nicholas Reynolds obtained a patent for 1000 acres lying on
Lawnes Creek (Doc.#156a)

       20 Feb 1638, Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 1, p. 676, James City County; Nicholas Reynolds listed as owning a
patent which adjoins the 500 acre patent of Thomas Stamp bounding southerly from the head of Lawnes Creek (Doc.#156b)

       Though no county is listed in the second land patent for Nicholas Reynolds dated 1637, as listed above, Lawnes Creek is
located on the border of the Upper Parish in Isle Of Wight County. The Upper Parish was adjacent to the Lower Parish where
Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his descendants resided for several generations. Notice that according to the 1638 patent,
Nicholas Reynolds’ land was located next to a 500 acre land patent issued to Thomas Stamp at the head of Lawnes Creek in
James City County. This indicates that Nicholas Reynolds’ land patents were actually located at the head waters of Lawnes
Creek which today is in Surry County and borders Isle of Wight County to the south (Doc.153b). Subject to documentation,
the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster by Col. Steve F. Tillman lists that a Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Mary
Anderson, resided in Surry County.

       1638, Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, p. 276; Richard Reynolds was transported to Charles City
County by John George (Doc.#21a)

       According to the publication entitled Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, who was clerk of the Virginia
State Land Office, there were several individuals named Reynolds/Reynolls who were transported to Colonial Virginia as
servants in the mid 1600's. The author of this publication appears to have extracted the names of these indentured servants
from the land patents and transportation records which were used to issue the original land patents and headrights to the
individuals who were responsible for transporting these servants to Virginia. This publication lists these immigrants and
indentured servants with the individual who was responsible for their transportation as well as the county to where they were
transported. Several were transported to Charles River and Charles City Counties. There were also three Richard Reynolds
who were transported to: New Norfolk County in 1637 as listed above; to Charles City County in 1638 as listed here; and to
Virginia, no county listed, in 1652. William Reynolds was the only immigrant/indentured servant listed who was transported to
Isle of Wight County. He was transported in 1648 by John Seward (Doc.#21a). Interestingly, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the
immigrant is not listed among them and only William Reynolds was transported to Isle of Wight County.

       1 May 1639, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. A, p.103; Christopher Reynolds sold 100 acre patent in Warrisquack
[Warwicke Squeake or Warrosquyoake] Bay to Peter Hull [Hill], Witnesses: John Spackman and John Oliver (Doc.#131ac,
135b)

       This appears to have been the same 100 acre tract which Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, purchased from
Robert Sabine five years earlier as listed above: 21 Dec 1634, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B.
Boddie, p. 531, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. A, p.103; Christopher Reynolds of Warwickqueak [Warrosquyoake
County] obtained 100 acre patent from Robert Sabine of Warrisquick [Warrosquyoake County] Bay, Witnesses: Robert
Cramporne and Thomas Coarkman (as shown in the deed of Wassell Webling and George Fawdon from Justinian Cooper and
wife) (Doc.#131ac, 135b). The land purchasde from Robert Sabine is the first record of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., obtaining
land in Virginia. From the year of Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s arrival in Virginia in 1622, it was twelve years later in 1634
before he first purchased land. This indicates that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was probably an indentured servant of Edward
Bennett. This also appears to support the theory that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., originally immigrated to Colonial Virginia as an
eleven year old child, who was possibly an orphan, in 1622.

 1642, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; Mr. Reynold listed as undersheriff and mentioned in a
deposition in Northampton County (Doc.#191b)

       This is the first records listing an individual named Reynolds/Reynold in Northampton County.

       1643, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; Nicholas Rennells listed as a witness in Surry County
(Doc.#191d)

       This appears to have been the same Nicholas Reynolds who obtained a land patent in 1637 and 1638 in James City
County as listed above: 26 Aug 1637, Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 1, p. 473; Nicholas Reynolds obtained a patent for
1000 acres lying on Lawnes Creek (Doc.#156a); 20 Feb 1638, Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 1, p. 676, James City
County; Nicholas Reynolds listed as owning a patent which adjoins the 500 acre patent of Thomas Stamp bounding southerly
from the head of Lawnes Creek (Doc.#156b). Though no county is listed in the first land patent for Nicholas Reynolds dated
1637, as listed above, Lawnes Creek is located on the border of the Upper Parish in Isle Of Wight County. The Upper Parish
was adjacent to the Lower Parish where Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his descendants resided for several generations.
Notice that according to the 1638 patent, Nicholas Reynolds’ land was located next to a 500 acre land patent issued to
Thomas Stamp at the head of Lawnes Creek in James City County. This indicates that Nicholas Reynolds’ land patents were
actually located at the head waters of Lawnes Creek which today is in Surry County and borders Isle of Wight County to the
south (Doc.153b). Subject to documentation, the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster by Col. Steve F. Tillman lists that a
Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Mary Anderson, resided in Surry County. The following information, which is listed below,
appears to pertain to the descendants of Nicholas Reynolds in Surry County: 30 Jan 1702, Surry County, Virginia Wills &
Administrations, Bk. 5, p. 267; Robert Reynolds will lists him about age sixty. Wife named Elizabeth; To grandson Nicholas,
the plantation that his son lives on when 21 years of age; To daughter Susannah...; To daughter Elizabeth; To grandson Robert
Griffin. Witnesses: John Griffen, Agness Griffin and Henry Baker. Proved 2 Mar 1702 (Doc.#186a-b). Aside from Nicholas
Reynolds, this is the earliest record which we have located so far for a Reynolds listed in Surry County records. These name
and residence patterns indicate that James was a descendant of Nicholas Reynolds: 23 Dec 1636, Virginia Land Office, Patent
Bk. 1, 1623-1643, p. 408; Nicholas Reynolds obtained a patent for 1000 acres lying at Lawnes Creek S.S. Et. up Lawnes
Creeke (Doc.#156). As revealed above, this Nicholas Reynolds inhabited James City County [which became Surry County in
1652] which in Colonial time periods bounded the northern border of Isle of Wight County. James City County was an original
shire/county of Virginia which was formed in 1634. In 1652, James City County changed it’s name to Surry County. According
to several genealogical data bases (including the Ancestral File) and Reynolds family histories, there was a Richard Reynolds
and his wife, Mary Anderson, who resided in Surry County during the colonial time period. However, no sources of
information are listed for these data bases regarding the Richard Reynolds and Mary Anderson of Surry County. Though the
county location for the 1636 patent for Nicholas Reynolds was not provided in the original description of the patent, the
description does list Lawnes Creek which corresponds with the northern boundary for the Upper Parish in Isle of Wight
County as described above. There was another estate record for Robert Reynolds on 5 Jul 1709 which was signed by Grace
Reynolds (Doc.#186b).

       21 Mar 1643, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 541, Christopher Reynolds
assigned 350 acres, on main branch of Bay Creek Called Cypress Swamp, to Arthur Smith (Doc.#131ad-131ae)

       Notice that there is no previous record of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., obtaining this 350 acres on Cypress Swamp (which
is also known as Cypress Creek on modern maps), a main branch of Bay Creek (which appears to be the same waterway as
the Pagan River) prior to his assigning it to Col. Arthur Smith, I. On modern day maps Cypress Creek is situated just outside
the Smithfield Town limits. Cypress Creek appears on Isle of Wight County maps as a tributary for the Pagan River which
empties into the James River.

       The history entitled Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John Bennett Boddie, lists the following on
p.541, “Gov. William Berkeley confirms to Arthur Smith 350 acres on the main branch of Bay Creek [Pagan River?]called
Cypress Swamp [part of Cypress Creek], first granted to James Roe by Patent 10 Dec 1640 and by him assigned to Arthur
Smith provided said Smith does not plant or seat [seed] for a term of three years, dated 21 Mar 1643." This area of Cypress
Swamp was later considered part of Newport Parish where Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his descendants resided for many
generations.

       Early church records of Isle of Wight County reveal that Newport Parish, where Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and many of
his descendants resided for several generations, was originally known as the Lower Parish according to deed and court
records. These early parish church records were patterned after the Episcopal Church of England since Virginia was an English
Colony prior to the Revolutionary War in 1776. Aside from land ownership regarding deeds and patents, the church and the
court were the bodies around which much public life in Colonial Virginia revolved. Isle of Wight and Nansemond Counties
played a significant part in the development of the Virginia Colony.

       According to the Parish Lines of Southern Virginia, by C. F. Cocke, the Upper and Lower Parishes of Isle of Wight
County were created from Warrosquyoake Parish in 1643. In 1734, the Upper Parish was divided with the lower half
becoming part of the Lower Parish, also called Newport Parish, and the upper half going to Nottoway Parish which later
became part of Southampton County (created from that portion of Isle of Wight County lying west of the Blackwater River)
when it was created from Isle of Wight County in 1749. The Upper Parish was dissolved by this division and the Lower Parish,
which existed from 1643-1743, was now officially called Newport Parish (Doc.#154a-b). Unfortunately, the records for the
Upper Parish, now known as Nottoway Parish in Southampton County, are not complete with current records not beginning
until 1748.

According to the publication entitled Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, who was clerk of the Virginia
State Land Office, there were several individuals named Reynolds/Reynolls who were transported to Colonial Virginia as
servants in the mid 1600's. The author of this publication appears to have extracted the names of these indentured servants
from the land patents and transportation records which were used to issue the original land patents and headrights to the
individuals who were responsible for transporting these servants to Virginia. This publication lists these immigrants and
indentured servants with the individual who was responsible for their transportation as well as the county where they were
transported. Several were transported to Charles River and Charles City Counties. There were also three Richard Reynolds
who were transported to: New Norfolk County in 1637; to Charles City County in 1638; and to Virginia, no county listed, in
1652. William Reynolds was the only immigrant/indentured servant listed who was transported to Isle of Wight County. He
was transported in 1648 by John Seward (Doc.#21a). Interestingly, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant is not listed
among them and only William Reynolds was transported to Isle of Wight County.



DEC 14, 2002
FROM ED HUDSON
EHUDSONIII@aol.com
Found the following in "The Genealogical History of The Reynolds Line 215 A.D. - Present"     Http://www.geocities.com/windstorm.geo/gen.html       I believe that (3) below explains the 1657 transaction by 15 year old Christopher Reynolds, Jr. which brought William Seller to Isle of Wight County from England.

Here's how Richard Reynolds, Jr., ends up with 566 acres of land, as best as I can tell:
 

(1) Christopher Reynolds Sr. was originally patented 450 acres of land, and bequeathed 241 acres of it to his son, Christopher Junior. Christopher Jr. bequeathed this acreage to Richard Jr.
 

(2) Christopher Reynolds Jr. also bequeathed to Richard Jr. an additional 100 acres, which was given to him by Richard Jordan.

(3) Richard Reynolds Jr. transported 12 people for Christopher Jr., and was paid for it with 225 acres of land. 241 + 100 + 225 = 566.

-Ed Hudson

===
Http://www.geocities.com/windstorm.geo/gen.html   =
 epictetus1@hotmail.com

All told, Christopher had seven children. When Christopher died May 1, 1654, Elizabeth remarried a Mr. Rivers and had at
least one and probably two additional children. There are those that state that Elizabeth was a Rivers before she was a
Reynolds, but I can't find any compelling evidence to support that theory.

Christopher died at the age of 43 instead of living to a ripe old age like his forefathers. This is to be expected because of the
extraordinarily harsh circumstances. Fighting indians and struggling to exist and provide for seven kids undoubtedly took a
heavy toll. He died in Isle of Wight County. Here are two transcriptions of his Will:

Will of Christopher Reynolds, dated May 1, 1654: Children, Christopher, John, Abbasha, Elizabeth, Jane, child my wife
now goeth with, Richard; wife Elizabeth; a yearling heifer to George Rivers; to son Christopher all my lands on
southerly side of the swamp that Richard Jordan now lives upon. (Source: Isle of Wight County VA - Records; William
and Mary College Qrtly, Vol. 7, No. 4, P. 221)

CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, Will, 1 May 1654; to son Christopher land that Richard Jordan liveth on. To son John
land near swamp when he is 21. To son Richard, land I live on when 21. My dau., Abbasha, I have given her a portion
already. To dau. Elizabeth, cattle. To George Rivers 1 heifer. To child wife goeth with. Wife Elizabeth to be Exrx. And
to bring up John and Richard, my sons untill they are 16. Teste, Sylvester Bullen, Anthony Matthews. (Source: "17th
Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia" by John Bennett Boddie, page 521

These are Christopher's children:

-Richard Reynolds, b. 1641, Isle of Wight County, Virginia; d. July.27.1711, Newport Parish, Virginia.
-Christopher Jr. (1642, Isle of Wight Co, VA-1695, Somerset Co, MD) m. c1680, Elizabeth Ann SHARPE (b. c1646, Isle of
Wight Co, VA)
-John, b1644 Isle of Wight, VA; d3/11/1668
-Abasha, b. 1646.
-Elizabeth, b. 1648. m. 1654, Isle of Wight Co, VA, Richard JORDAN
-Jane, b. 1650.
-Thomas, b1655 Isle of Wight, VA; d1703 New Kent Co, VA m. c1679, Mary Elizabeth ASHALL

 
GENERATION 5: Richard Reynolds

Richard Reynolds was born in 1641 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia. In 1669, he married Elizabeth SHARPE. They had five
children. Richard died on July 27, 1711 in Newport Parish, Virginia at the age of 70. From his will:

Will of Richard Reynolds, of Newport: Wife Elizabeth; Sons Richard, Christopher, Sharpe (?). Dated 27 July, 1711;
proved 26 May, 1712. (Source: Isle of Wight County VA - Records; William and Mary College Qrtly, Vol. 7, No. 4, P.
255)

These are Richard's children:

-Richard Reynolds Jr., b. 1669, Isle of Wight County, Virginia; d.Unknown.
-Christopher, b. 1670.
-Sharpe, (b1672, Isle of Wight Co, VA, d July 8, 1754?)
-Elizabeth, b1674
-John, b. October 5, 1710.

Elizabeth and John are not listed in his will, which raises a red flag. I can see Elizabeth slipping through the cracks since she
wasn't a son, but John, all those years later, shortly before Richard's death, is likely a mistake.

A Curious Patent. Here is a land patent I came across, and hopefully someone out there can help me decipher it. Please.

Patent Book No. 6: Richard Reynolds, the younger, of Is. Of W. Co., 566 acs., in the Low. Par. of sd. Co., on NW side
of the head of the low. Bay Cr; 10 May 1679. P. 684. Beg. at an island near head of sd. Cr: to Chr. Bly's line; along
Hen. King; to Col. Smith. & Mr. Driver; to head of West Freshett or swamp. &c 241 acs. Part of 450 acs. Granted Mr.
Chr. Reynolds, late of sd. Co., 15 Sept, 1636. & by will given to his eldest sonn Chr. & his heires forever who
bequeathed to sd. Richard, his only sonn & heire; 100 acs. Part of 350 acs. Granted to Mr. Richd. Jordan. Senr. 18
Mar. 1662. Who conveighed to sd. Chr. Reynoldes 17 May 1658. Who bequeathed to sd. Richards: 225 acs. being
waste. together with sd. 341 acs., due for trans. of 12 pers: Danll Hennon (Herron - altered), Jno. Champion, Lewis
Davis, Edwd. Goodson. (Note: Conveyance from Jordan to Reynolds antedates this patent) (Cavaliers and Pioneers,
Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, Volume Two: 1666-1695, Page 198)

Now in English:

Richard Reynolds, Jr., of Isle of Wight County, 566 acres in the lower part of said county, on the northwest side of the
head of the lower Bay Creek; 10 May 1679.

This part is fairly straightforward, saying that Richard Jr. was patented 566 acres in 1679. What I want to know is how come a
boy of 10 years of age is having land patented in his name already. Is this normal? I wouldn't think so.

Beginning at an island near head of said creek, to Christopher Bly's line; along Henry King; to Col. Smith & Mr.
Driver; to head of West Freshett or swamp.

Just further description of the boundaries...

&c 241 acres, part of 450 acres granted Mr. Christopher Reynolds, late of said county on 15 Sept. 1636 and by will
given to his eldest son Christopher.....

This part we know from Christopher's will, though I don't know what "&c" means. Perhaps "and containing"?

and his heirs forever, who bequeathed to said Richard, his only son and heir 100 acres, part of 350 acres granted to
Mr. Richard Jordan Sr. on 18 March, 1662, who transferred ownership to said Christopher Reynolds 17 May, 1658,
who bequeathed to sd. Richard 225 acres being waste together with 341 acres, due for transport of 12 persons.

Alright, that's the real confusing part. We know that Christopher had more than one son. We know that Richard Sr. had more
than one son. Every Reynolds in all the generations I can find has had more than one son. So why does it say "his only son and
heir"?

Here's how Richard Reynolds, Jr., ends up with 566 acres of land, as best as I can tell:
 

(1) Christopher Reynolds Sr. was originally patented 450 acres of land, and bequeathed 241 acres of it to his son, Christopher
Junior. Christopher Jr. bequeathed this acreage to Richard Jr.
 

(2) Christopher Reynolds Jr. also bequeathed to Richard Jr. an additional 100 acres, which was given to him by Richard
Jordan.

(3) Richard Reynolds Jr. transported 12 people for Christopher Jr., and was paid for it with 225 acres of land. 241 + 100 +
225 = 566.

This patent listing is causing me many sleepless nights trying to figure it all out. If anyone can shed clarity on it, I would
appreciate it.



DEC 14, 2002
ED, thanks. will add to the REYNOLDS charts. We/They NEED ages with names.
I don't know if we ever married into Reynolds and their relation.
BUT,  we Need Where We all came from .

But our SELLERS were in ISLE OF WIGHT till ca 1714?
This was a Large area of land at that time.
So,  some kids born in VA by or before this date!
Then, where did we go?
WE owned land here in 1684. (gift of Josiah HARRISON) maybe a dau of his
married our SELLERS?

MAYBE we should concentrate on this family, also?
Don't think I found much on JOSIAH HARRISON!
Need.
Isle of Wight may have more info that I didn't extract?
Will Add any info on JOSIAH/ISAIAH HARRISON from Isle of Wight, VA, etc.
Thanks, marie, iowa
 

  -----Original Message-----
  From: EHUDSONIII@aol.com [mailto:EHUDSONIII@aol.com]
  Sent: Saturday, December 14, 2002 2:26 PM
  To: Mari@netins.net
  Subject: 1657 Transport of William Seller et. al.
 

  Marie,
  Found the following in "The Genealogical History of The Reynolds Line 215
A.D. - Present"     Http://www.geocities.com/windstorm.geo/gen.html       I
believe that (3) below explains the 1657 transaction by 15 year old
Christopher Reynolds, Jr. which brought William Seller to Isle of Wight
County from England.

  Here's how Richard Reynolds, Jr., ends up with 566 acres of land, as best
as I can tell:
 

  (1) Christopher Reynolds Sr. was originally patented 450 acres of land,
and bequeathed 241 acres of it to his son, Christopher Junior. Christopher
Jr. bequeathed this acreage to Richard Jr.
 

  (2) Christopher Reynolds Jr. also bequeathed to Richard Jr. an additional
100 acres, which was given to him by Richard Jordan.

  (3) Richard Reynolds Jr. transported 12 people for Christopher Jr., and
was paid for it with 225 acres of land. 241 + 100 + 225 = 566.

  -Ed Hudson


march 18, 2003
Ray Revette [rrevette@ij.net]

In the book List of Emigrants to America 1600 - 1700 by Hotten.
No Sellers, No Redwood, but 3 items on Christopher Reynolds.
1)  28 May 1635 - to be transported to Virginea in the  Speedwell of
    London. Jo. Chappell MR -- Taken the oath of  allegeance Chri.
    Reynolds age 24.
 
2)  List of names of the Living in Virginia 16 Feb 1623, living at
    Warwick Squarke  Chr. Reynold.
 
3)  The Muster of the Inhabitants of Wariscoyack, taken the 7th Feb
    1924
 
    Christopher Reynold } in the John and Francis, 1622