SELLERS HALL of DELAWARE CO, PA

==============

  SELLERS HALL from ALICE CHURCH PAGE =
http://www.preservationnation.org/magazine/2009/september-october/transitions.html

THERE IS SOME CONTROVERSY ABOUT ST ALICE CHURCH AND NOT TAKING DONATIONS. (OCT, 2009,msh)

 

We NEED the new address for contributions. SEE bottom letter from =

"Wjmcdevitt@aol.com" <Wjmcdevitt@aol.com>

and helpers

TIM SELLERS and COLEMAN SELLERS

 

====================

SELLERS HALL 1896

 

=================

http://sellershall.org/Sellers%20Hall%20-%20Complete%20Report%202011.pdf
as of 2011.  This is the report.
Harriette <hmw1808@aol.com>

 

 

TOWNSHIP HISTORY

http://sellershall.org/

"Sellers' Hall" 

George and Samuel Sellers, both Quakers, were among the first settlers of the area, having purchased 100 acres in the eastern section of the Township. Samuel Sellers (1655-1732), reputedly America's first wire weaver, became patron of the Township's most famous family. At first he lived in a cave near 69th and Walnut Streets, near where he later built the oldest sections of "Sellers' Hall" in 1684.

One of the first homes in the area, "Sellers' Hall" was the home to four successive generations of Sellers. When George Sellers, of the fourth generation, died in 1853, the "Sellers' Hall" homestead contained 233 acres of land.

Later, "Sellers' Hall" became known as Thomas H. Powers' "Elim Farm." Today, the home stands as the St. Alice Roman Catholic Church Library. "Sellers' Hall" is also the site of a Pennsylvania historical marker.
SELLERS HALL 1906

 

=====
Threatened

Sellers Hall  In 1682, Upper Darby, Pa., was so remote that Samuel Sellers lived in a cave while constructing his house. The farmhouse (pictured above in 1906) survived the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, and the Civil War, and provided shelter for slaves fleeing north. Today the deteriorating structure is owned by St. Alice Church. Parish officials once planned to raze the building, but now say they will leave it standing, though no reuse plan has been proposed. Local preservationists have formed a group called Save Sellers Hall; their first initiative is to list the building on the National Register of Historic Places.

http://sellershall.org/

http://sellershall.org/news.html (UPDATE)

http://sellershall.org/donate.html (DONATE)

========

SEPT 2009
from LuJuana Lipscomb [txcuz@webtv.net]

"Threatened Sellers Hall. In 1682, Upper Darby, PA., was so remote that SAMUEL SELLERS lived in a cave while constructing his house. The farmhouse (pictured above in 1906) survived the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, and the Civil War, and provided shelter for slaves fleeing north. Today the deteriorating structure is owned by St. Alice Church. Parish officials once planned to raze the building, but now say they will leave it standing, though no reuse plan has been proposed. Local preservationists have formed a group called Save Sellers Hall; their first initiative is to list the building on the National Register of Historic Places."

It has a high sloping roof, two dormer windows, five windows with shutters on second floor, might be six as tree obscuring left view, ground floor has five or six windows with shutters, single door which is offset from center, porch looks fairly narrow with four slender columns ?, maybe one step from ground. Beneath the left tree I can see a single door and one window without shutter ? on left side of house. On the right side appears to be a later add on indented from main house with one window, one door, high sloping roof, but not as high as house roof, with maybe a dormer window or chimney. This window has solid board shutter, tree. The add on roof looks peculiar to me as if it extended to top of second floor.

I donate every year which is why I get the magazine. Will have to request that the Nat'l Trust if they get approved, to send to Seller Hall.

LuJuana 78+ DWF, TX



DEC 2004

Seeley1022@aol.com

Sellers Hall built in 1684 by Samuel Sellers and Anna Gibbons is still standing at St. Alice Church with a Historical Marker. Friends Of Sellers Hall are collecting funds and applying for grants to restore the building. We are looking for family members.

 

http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec/msg/an/JWGBAEB/1215


=============
http://www.philly.com/inquirer/local/20090329_A_17th-century_survivor_is_imperiled.html
Posted on Sun, Mar. 29, 2009

A 17th-century survivor is imperiled

By Stephan Salisbury

Inquirer Culture Writer

When the first stone was laid for Sellers Hall in 1682, there was no Upper Darby, Philadelphia was largely an imaginary place, and Samuel Sellers was living in a cave near what is now Garrett Road in Delaware County.

The house was completed a year or so later, Sellers moved in with his new bride, and the couple launched what would become a remarkable multigenerational engineering clan that ultimately tooled the machines driving America's industrial revolution.

Sellers family members were founders and leaders of the American Philosophical Society and the Franklin Institute. They were staunch abolitionists, and the little Upper Darby house with the steeply raked roof became a documented Underground Railroad stop.

More than three centuries after it was built, Sellers Hall still stands, boarded up and vacant, on the grounds of its current owner, St. Alice Church.

But how long it will remain standing is in doubt. Citing the building's bedraggled condition, the Roman Catholic parish would like to tear it down, and has solicited bids to do so - to the dismay of many historically minded local residents, Sellers descendants, representatives of the preservation community, and political leaders.

The Rev. Peter N. Quinn, pastor of St. Alice, which has owned Sellers Hall since 1922, said the church lacked money to repair it.

"Financially we are not able to save it," he said. "It could cause problems, or damage, or vandalism. Even if we fix it up, what would we use it for? The [church finance] council recommended demolishing. It is up to the hands of the diocese."

State Rep. Mario J. Civera Jr. of Upper Darby, the Republican chair of the House Appropriations Committee, said he opposed demolition and offered to help find a solution short of that.

"I would be happy to sit down with everyone and see what can be done," he said.

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia, which acquired Sellers Hall for St. Alice for $1, according to documents at the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, has joined the call for more discussion.

The archdiocese is "hopeful of meeting in the near future," spokeswoman Donna Farrell wrote in an e-mail. "At that time, it would be our goal to discuss various scenarios and come to an understanding of the exact historical significance of this site and work toward a viable solution to a very complicated matter."

John Gallery, head of the Preservation Alliance of Greater Philadelphia, noted that 17th-century buildings such as Sellers Hall "are extremely rare" in this area and said: "Every effort should be made to preserve it. We'd be happy and eager to be part of any conversation to see what can be done."

Though one of only a handful of 17th-century structures remaining in Pennsylvania, the building is not protected by any historical designation, and Upper Darby has no preservation ordinance that could shield it, township officials said.

Township Manager Tom Judge noted that "we don't own it." Ownership affords the only protection at the township's disposal, he said.

Mortimer Sellers, regents professor of law at the University of Maryland and a direct descendant of Samuel Sellers, has proposed establishing a nonprofit group to raise money and perhaps maintain the building. But he has said he is open to any approach that might save it.

About five years ago, when the roof began leaking badly, Sellers helped an informal group, the Friends of Sellers Hall, raise money for emergency repairs. At that time, there was hope that a long-term preservation arrangement could be worked out with the church, he said.

"The starting point is that it is something St. Alice's can take pride in. They own this very, very important building, and it has been part of their history for a very long time. Masses were held there originally. Visiting priests lived there. It was a library for the church."

Sellers added: "My first interest is that it not be destroyed. Then, if it is restored, that it be done in as accurate a way as possible."

Samuel Sellers acquired much land in what is now Upper Darby, establishing several mills and using his skills as a wire weaver to create screens of all kinds. One of his sons added to the family holdings and invented a machine for weaving worsteds.

John Sellers (1728-1804), Samuel's grandson, built sawmills, gristmills, and a tilt mill on area streams. He invented textile machines and constructed wire rolling screens for cleaning wheat and flax seed - possibly the first in the country. He was a surveyor, an astronomer, and a founder of the American Philosophical Society.

His grandson John Sellers III greatly expanded the Sellers milling operation at Milbourne Mills. Coleman Sellers, a 19th-century descendant, was an inventor and engineer, receiving 30 patents. William Sellers, who moved to Delaware, was an engineer and inventor with 90 patents. He created the standardized screw, served as president of the Franklin Institute in the mid-1860s, and built a powerful machine-tooling business.

Despite its occupants' far-flung activities, Sellers Hall remained critical to the family's moral and ethical life. Its basement hid slaves fleeing north before the Civil War.

Coleman Sellers, a photographer who lives in Delaware, said a document written by a member of the abolitionist Garrett family in Upper Darby described a prewar visit to Sellers Hall.

"In the basement he heard a noise, opened the door, and saw people," Sellers recounted. "He described dark faces and bright white eyes, eyes full of fear that they had been caught."

"The family story is really critical," said George Thomas, an architectural historian at the University of Pennsylvania. "They ran maybe the most important machine business in the world."

Preparations for a listing on the National Register of Historic Places began four years ago, members of the Upper Darby Historical Society said.

Most papers were drawn up by the Delaware County Planning Commission and submitted to the state, but more were required, and the county planning official spearheading the effort retired.

The society has sought help gathering information on Sellers Hall for several years, as well as passage of a local ordinance that would slow demolition of historic structures, said Beverly Rorer, the group's corresponding secretary.

"It's really hard to save a building," she said. "We don't have money to buy. You need owners who can restore or others who can buy. Right now, you can get a permit and the next day it's gone."

No permit has been applied for in the case of Sellers Hall, according to the township office of licenses and inspections. But St. Alice has sought bids, said Jeanne M. Gallagher, a member of the church finance council. She characterized the building as "somewhat of an eyesore" that the council decided should make way for usable space. Perhaps, she said, a prefabricated building could be set on a cement slab in the cleared area.

Gallagher said the church and council were not unmindful of Sellers Hall's historical significance. What's needed, she said, is a specific proposal.

"At this point, we're waiting to hear from the archdiocese. It's not that the parish is unwilling to consider this. We're very aware that there's a lot of concern. The parish absolutely does not have the resources to deal with it."

Gallagher said the church wanted to see "a plan and a timeline."

"So far, no one has come to the parish . . . with any kind of concrete plan saying, 'This is what we want to do.' "

Upper Darby's Sellers Hall sheltered generations of an engineering clan that helped drive the nation's industrial revolution. For a time, it wasan Underground Railroad stop. Now it is deteriorating. The church that owns it would like to tear it down, but preservationists still have hope

 

 

 

===========

Seeley1022@aol.com

 

http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec/msg/an/JWGBAEB/1215.1

 

Message Board Post:

 

F  0  R     I  M  M  E  D  I  A  T  E     R  E  L  E  A  S  E

 

 

 

SELLERS HALL ON THE VERGE OF BEING LOST!

 

 

 

Sellers Hall, located on St. Alice’s Parish grounds, (Walnut St. & Hampden Rd. in the 69th St. area) has deteriorated almost to the point of no return. Deacon Charles Amen’s concern has been shared by members of the parish and the community. Recently, a self-proclaimed group of concerned citizens and volunteers, who call themselves “Friends of Sellers Hall,” has organized meetings to save the building which belonged to the first registered resident of Upper Darby, Samuel Sellers. The parish has almost no resources available – support is urgently needed to make essential repairs to the roof, windows and other structural areas.  VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED – PLEASE CALL DEACON AMEN AT 610-259-6985.

 

 

 

Samuel Sellers came here in 1682 and built his home in 1684 where he and his wife Anna Gibbons lived. They were followed in the home by several generations of the Sellers Family.

 

 

 

The Sellers were renown for their early wire-weaving mills in the area, for numerous inventions (some on a national level) and for their activity in local politics. They were active in the underground railroad, secretly directing fugitives from this location to other points north and west on their way to freedom.

 

 

 

The home has an historic marker from the "Pennsylvania Historic and Museum Commission." Unfortunately, the building has been deteriorating in the past several years. John Milner, renown historic architect, is advising the committee on the steps to be taken. The committee is applying for a Keystone Grant and is working to place it on the National Register of Historic places, both with Mr. Milner's assistance. Plans are to have it open to the public and perhaps include a museum.

 

 

 

Anyone who wishes to be a part of this significant effort should contact Deacon Amen (610-259-6985) or Mary Ellen Gontaryk (610-352-1389). A fund is being set up to stabilize the building in preparation for restoration work. You can be a part of this effort! Checks may be made out to: "St. Alice - Sellers Hall Fund" and sent to:

 

 

 

St. Alice Rectory

 

150 Hampden Road

 

Upper Darby, PA 19082

 

 

 

 You will be placed on the mailing list to receive newsletters updating you on the work’s progress.

ROBERT, thanks.

Is there a web page for "SELLERS HALL" fund drive?  Do they have to raise so much money to get the grant? Is it linked to the Bucks Co., Pa genweb page?   They should get good coverage on it.

Keep us up to date.

marie, iowa

 

 

 

 

===========

from WILLIAM aka DOUG

Doug Meharry [doug@moxilogic.com]

Sellers Hall
and some information about the first Sellars/Sellers who came here in 1683/4
with William Penn.

http://www.upperdarby.org/sellershall.html

"Sellers' Hall"
George and Samuel Sellers, both Quakers, were among the first settlers of the area, having purchased 100 acres in the eastern section of the Township. Samuel Sellers (1655-1732), reputedly America's first wire weaver, became patron of the Township's most famous family. At first he lived in a cave near 69th and Walnut Streets, near where he later built the oldest sections of "Sellers' Hall" in 1684.

One of the first homes in the area, "Sellers' Hall" was the home to four successive generations of Sellers. When George Sellers, of the fourth generation, died in 1853, the "Sellers' Hall" homestead contained 233 acres of land.

Later, "Sellers' Hall" became known as Thomas H. Powers' "Elim Farm." Today, the home stands as the St. Alice Roman Catholic Church Library. "Sellers' Hall" is also the site of a Pennsylvania historical marker.


1896 View of "Sellers' Hall"

==========

march 2009

john Haigis [johnghd@yahoo.com]

I am seeking information on a C.C. Sellers who owned our Circa 1734 house in Darby Borough, PA (1006 Main Street http://www.darbyhistory.com/1006Main.html ) in the 19th Century and who we think built the house at 1018 Main Street circa 1870. We think C.C. may have been Charles Coleman but frankly are not sure. We have a possible line of succession for the house from John Blunston to C.C. Sellers for the house  http://www.darbyhistory.com/Blunston-Sellers2.pdf but have pieces missing. It is possible he moved into the house after his marriage to Rebecca Bunting in 1854.  We feel that he may have been involved in Underground Railroad activity, but have not yet found documentation. Any information on any of this would be greatly appreciated
 
John Haigis
1006 Main Street
Darby, PA 19023
(610) 583-0788
 
You may be interested in this article about Sellers Hall in Upper Darby that appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer this morning
 
Posted on Sun, Mar. 29, 2009


 

A 17th-century survivor is imperiled

By Stephan Salisbury

Inquirer Culture Writer

When the first stone was laid for Sellers Hall in 1682, there was no Upper Darby, Philadelphia was largely an imaginary place, and Samuel Sellers was living in a cave near what is now Garrett Road in Delaware County.
The house was completed a year or so later, Sellers moved in with his new bride, and the couple launched what would become a remarkable multigenerational engineering clan that ultimately tooled the machines driving America's industrial revolution.
Sellers family members were founders and leaders of the American Philosophical Society and the Franklin Institute. They were staunch abolitionists, and the little Upper Darby house with the steeply raked roof became a documented Underground Railroad stop.
More than three centuries after it was built, Sellers Hall still stands, boarded up and vacant, on the grounds of its current owner, St. Alice Church.
But how long it will remain standing is in doubt. Citing the building's bedraggled condition, the Roman Catholic parish would like to tear it down, and has solicited bids to do so - to the dismay of many historically minded local residents, Sellers descendants, representatives of the preservation community, and political leaders.
The Rev. Peter N. Quinn, pastor of St. Alice, which has owned Sellers Hall since 1922, said the church lacked money to repair it.
"Financially we are not able to save it," he said. "It could cause problems, or damage, or vandalism. Even if we fix it up, what would we use it for? The [church finance] council recommended demolishing. It is up to the hands of the diocese."
State Rep. Mario J. Civera Jr. of Upper Darby, the Republican chair of the House Appropriations Committee, said he opposed demolition and offered to help find a solution short of that.
"I would be happy to sit down with everyone and see what can be done," he said.
The Archdiocese of Philadelphia, which acquired Sellers Hall for St. Alice for $1, according to documents at the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, has joined the call for more discussion.
The archdiocese is "hopeful of meeting in the near future," spokeswoman Donna Farrell wrote in an e-mail. "At that time, it would be our goal to discuss various scenarios and come to an understanding of the exact historical significance of this site and work toward a viable solution to a very complicated matter."
John Gallery, head of the Preservation Alliance of Greater Philadelphia, noted that 17th-century buildings such as Sellers Hall "are extremely rare" in this area and said: "Every effort should be made to preserve it. We'd be happy and eager to be part of any conversation to see what can be done."
Though one of only a handful of 17th-century structures remaining in Pennsylvania, the building is not protected by any historical designation, and Upper Darby has no preservation ordinance that could shield it, township officials said.
Township Manager Tom Judge noted that "we don't own it." Ownership affords the only protection at the township's disposal, he said.
Mortimer Sellers, regents professor of law at the University of Maryland and a direct descendant of Samuel Sellers, has proposed establishing a nonprofit group to raise money and perhaps maintain the building. But he has said he is open to any approach that might save it.
About five years ago, when the roof began leaking badly, Sellers helped an informal group, the Friends of Sellers Hall, raise money for emergency repairs. At that time, there was hope that a long-term preservation arrangement could be worked out with the church, he said.
"The starting point is that it is something St. Alice's can take pride in. They own this very, very important building, and it has been part of their history for a very long time. Masses were held there originally. Visiting priests lived there. It was a library for the church."
Sellers added: "My first interest is that it not be destroyed. Then, if it is restored, that it be done in as accurate a way as possible."
Samuel Sellers acquired much land in what is now Upper Darby, establishing several mills and using his skills as a wire weaver to create screens of all kinds. One of his sons added to the family holdings and invented a machine for weaving worsteds.
John Sellers (1728-1804), Samuel's grandson, built sawmills, gristmills, and a tilt mill on area streams. He invented textile machines and constructed wire rolling screens for cleaning wheat and flax seed - possibly the first in the country. He was a surveyor, an astronomer, and a founder of the American Philosophical Society.
His grandson John Sellers III greatly expanded the Sellers milling operation at Milbourne Mills. Coleman Sellers, a 19th-century descendant, was an inventor and engineer, receiving 30 patents. William Sellers, who moved to Delaware, was an engineer and inventor with 90 patents. He created the standardized screw, served as president of the Franklin Institute in the mid-1860s, and built a powerful machine-tooling business.
Despite its occupants' far-flung activities, Sellers Hall remained critical to the family's moral and ethical life. Its basement hid slaves fleeing north before the Civil War.
Coleman Sellers, a photographer who lives in Delaware, said a document written by a member of the abolitionist Garrett family in Upper Darby described a prewar visit to Sellers Hall.
"In the basement he heard a noise, opened the door, and saw people," Sellers recounted. "He described dark faces and bright white eyes, eyes full of fear that they had been caught."
"The family story is really critical," said George Thomas, an architectural historian at the University of Pennsylvania. "They ran maybe the most important machine business in the world."
Preparations for a listing on the National Register of Historic Places began four years ago, members of the Upper Darby Historical Society said.
Most papers were drawn up by the Delaware County Planning Commission and submitted to the state, but more were required, and the county planning official spearheading the effort retired.
The society has sought help gathering information on Sellers Hall for several years, as well as passage of a local ordinance that would slow demolition of historic structures, said Beverly Rorer, the group's corresponding secretary.
"It's really hard to save a building," she said. "We don't have money to buy. You need owners who can restore or others who can buy. Right now, you can get a permit and the next day it's gone."
No permit has been applied for in the case of Sellers Hall, according to the township office of licenses and inspections. But St. Alice has sought bids, said Jeanne M. Gallagher, a member of the church finance council. She characterized the building as "somewhat of an eyesore" that the council decided should make way for usable space. Perhaps, she said, a prefabricated building could be set on a cement slab in the cleared area.
Gallagher said the church and council were not unmindful of Sellers Hall's historical significance. What's needed, she said, is a specific proposal.
"At this point, we're waiting to hear from the archdiocese. It's not that the parish is unwilling to consider this. We're very aware that there's a lot of concern. The parish absolutely does not have the resources to deal with it."
Gallagher said the church wanted to see "a plan and a timeline."
"So far, no one has come to the parish . . . with any kind of concrete plan saying, 'This is what we want to do.' "

Contact culture writer Stephan Salisbury at 215-854-5594 or ssalisbury@phillynews.com.

=======================================

Sellers Hall (Built 1684); Upper Darby, Delaware County, PA Contributed to the PAGenWeb Archives by Robert E. Seeley Seeley1022@aol.com Copyright 2004. All Rights Reserved. http://www.usgwarchives.net/copyright.htm http://www.usgwarchives.net/pa/pafiles.htm ********************************************************* Sellers Hall Image #1 http://www.usgwarchives.net/pa/delaware/famhist/sellershall1.jpg From Lori Clark and Robert Seeley .
Picture from Sellers Library [Hoodland], Tom Smith. This picture was taken in about 1906 of Sellers Hall built in 1684.
The home is on the property of St. Alice Church. A committee has formed to save Sellers Hall and funds are being collected. This must be one of the oldest homes in America. Sellers Hall Original Tract consist of 100 acres was granted in 1690 but rented before the land from William Penn. George and Samuel Sellers brothers arrival in 1682 but George died in first year. Lived in Cave On property Oldest section of Sellers Hall was built 1684 Samuel Sellers 1655 -1732 was America's first wire weaver. Samuel married Ann Gibbons in 1684 first marriage recorded in Darby Meeting House In 1691 purchased 75 more acres and by the forth generation in 1853 a total of 233 acres Samuel 2nd 1690 - 1773 was community activist, a supervisor in 1725, 1730, & 1752. He was a constable in 1748 and overseer of poor, John 1725 - 1804 was the first of the great Sellers inventors/mechanical engineers. Inventions included water power system to run the mills, wire screening for sieves and wire cards used in the textile mills. He added a tilt mill, grist mill and saw mill to the Sellers business. John was a charter member of the Franklin Institute and American Philosophical Society. He was a surveyor, an engineer, and a Revolutionary War Patriot, a cause that had him disowned by the Friends. He surveyed and mapped the Delaware River coast for George Washington and plotted the county line dividing Chester and Delaware Counties. He served in both the Pennsylvania colonial and state Assemblies and the Constitutional Convention of 1790. Nathan, son of John, 1751 - 1830 in 1775 made wire fans for Anthony Wayne and John Penn to clean wheat. He was famous for his inventions for drawing wire and wire weaving. In 1776 was the recorder for the Superior Executive Council of Pennsylvania. Served in Rev. War an ensign in Colonel Paschal's battalion. While serving a special act of Congress recalled him to make wire molds needed to make paper and print money. In 1776 Nathan and George Gray Jr. signed and numbered over 20,000 notes of the Continental Currency of the United Colonies. Congress commissioned Nathan to design paper water marks to prevent counterfeiting. In 1798 built the first cotton mill in Cardington with his brother David. In 1817 he built Millbank Home in Upper Darby. Nathan brother David built Springton Homestead in 1839 a 156 acre farm where Margate and Maderia Roads intersect. The Sellers also owned Brookfield Homestead located on the grounds of Beverly Hills School. Coleman, son of Nathan, developed and built fire engines at 16th and Market Streets. Coleman married the daughter of Charles Willson Peale, the famous painter. In 1821 was on the board that built Eastern Penitentiary. In 1828 built a foundry and carding machinery factory named Cardington Iron Works and Sellers Locomotive Works in Cardington and built homes for the workers. One of the first locomotives was built " America". Coleman also donated land for the first Union School and financed the New Jerusalem Church. Coleman, son of Coleman, 1827 - 1907 obtain a patent for a motion picture machine. He was a mechanical engineer and instructor at the Franklin Institute School. In 1860 Coleman made several Sterographical photo sequences the view he call a " Kinematoscope" George , another son of Coleman, 1808 - 1899, also an engineer and inventor. Invented a hill climber machine used to construct the Panama Canal. He also invented surveying equipment. In 1830 George, Samuel Jr., Nathan, and John Sellers were charter members of the Abolitionist Society. My Garrett family and Sellers family worked together on the UGRR. The Sellers family made major contributions not just locally but nationally for our country. I feel it is extremely important to save Sellers Hall and preserve the history of the Sellers family. Sellers Hall comments from Dr. Okur at Temple, my dear friend and expert on UGRR The Garretts, Sellers and Pennocks worked together (secretly though) on UGRR although we do not know how, in which ways, and to what extent. But these families whose children intermarried helped strengthen the cause of abolition over time. They were also influential in helping the Pennsylvania Hall built, in the center of Philadelphia, through their generous donations. The majestic building, which was the first of its kind, in terms of its planned service, was burned down by an angry mob three days after its opening. Comment From my friend Tom Smith archivist at Sellers Library. Tom Smith's opinion: Simply, Sellers Hall stands as the closest kin, he knows, to the Cloister buildings in Ephrata. Clearly, the superstructure of Sellers Hall is 1600's building. Amazing! It was a place of safety for many passengers on the UGRR. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sellers Hall Image #2 http://www.usgwarchives.net/pa/delaware/famhist/sellershall2.jpg Image taken November 2004 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sellers Hall Image #3 http://www.usgwarchives.net/pa/delaware/famhist/sellershall3.jpg Historical Sign Sellers Hall ------/----- First permanent home in Upper Darby, built about 1684 by Samuel Sellers, who occupied it with his bride, Anna Gibbons. Their Son, Samuel Sellers, Jr., was the first of many family members active in mechanical and scientific pursuits. Birthplace of John Sellers, a founder of the American Philosophical Society. In 1769 he served on a select committee that observed the planet Venus in its passage across the sun. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sellers Hall Image #4 http://www.usgwarchives.net/pa/delaware/famhist/sellershall4.jpg A deep hole on the outside wall of Sellers Hall with entry to cellar covered by slab. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sellers Hall image #5 http://www.usgwarchives.net/pa/delaware/famhist/sellershall5.jpg Cellar Wall of Sellers Hall

 

====================

march 30, 2009

JOHN, Charles Cadwallader Sellers 1830/1895 lived here in this area 1860 and 1870.
No house addresses on census. some descriptions on land = (down below the census) http://www.sellers-sellars-sollars-zellars.net/padelaw.htm

hope it may help.
marie, iowa


DELAWARE COUNTY REPUBLICAN
Marriage
On the 19th inst., by Friends Ceremony, at the residence of
Jabez Bunting, Darby, CHARLES C. << SELLERS>> to REBECCA R.
BUNTING, all of this county.
4-21-1854

1850 Darby, Delaware, Pennsylvania
Jabez Bunting 50 PA
Keg R Bunting 42 NJ
Rebecca R Bunting 16 PA
Mary Bunting 13 PA
Jos S Bunting 11 PA
Jabez Bunting 8 PA
Josiah Bunting 5 PA


1850 Upper Darby, DELAWARE CO, PA
JAS SELLERS 68 PA
ELIZ 60 PA
REBECCA 31 PA
ELLEN 29 PA
ELIZ 27 PA
GEO 22 PA
JOS 11M PA
WM 9 PA
C. CAD SELLERS 26 PA
CHAS SMITH 17M PA
SUSAN HENRY 6 PAR RICE 23 IRELAND

1860 C Cadwalader Sellers 35 PA, Upper Darby, Delaware, PA, FARMER, 40,000/3812
Alfred L Sellers 7 NJ
Elizabeth Sellers 67 PA, 0 LAND/600
Rebecca J Sellers 40 PA
Mary Lewis 30 PA, IDIOTIC, 50,000/12,000
Peter Kearns 30 IRELAND, GARDNER
Jane Wright 40 ENGLAND, NURSE
Mary Mchugh 30 IRELAND, DOMESTIC
Mary Dunn 30 IRELAND, DOMESTIC

1870
Chas C Sellers Darby, Delaware, PA abt 1831 Pennsylvania White Male

Rebecca R Sellers Darby, Delaware, PA abt 1834 Pennsylvania White Female
Elizabeth Sellers Darby, Delaware, PA abt 1860 Pennsylvania White
Female
Jabez B Sellers Darby, Delaware, PA abt 1856 Pennsylvania White Male

=====================

Marie: Thank you. I am sorry for the delay in thanking you......somehow your e-mail went to bulk mail which I don't check as often......We think the Charles C. is the C.C. Sellers who lived here and Jabez B. is likely Jabez Bunting Sellers and fits into the chronology  http://www.darbyhistory.com/Blunston-Sellers2.pdf
 and may have been named after his grandfather . THANK YOU
John.. As Mr Holmes might say, "the game is afoot"

 

TOWNSHIP HISTORY


Back to Brief History

http://www.upperdarby.org/sellershall.html
"Sellers' Hall" 

George and Samuel Sellers, both Quakers, were among the first settlers of the area, having purchased 100 acres in the eastern section of the Township. Samuel Sellers (1655-1732), reputedly America's first wire weaver, became patron of the Township's most famous family. At first he lived in a cave near 69th and Walnut Streets, near where he later built the oldest sections of "Sellers' Hall" in 1684.

One of the first homes in the area, "Sellers' Hall" was the home to four successive generations of Sellers. When George Sellers, of the fourth generation, died in 1853, the "Sellers' Hall" homestead contained 233 acres of land.

Later, "Sellers' Hall" became known as Thomas H. Powers' "Elim Farm." Today, the home stands as the St. Alice Roman Catholic Church Library. "Sellers' Hall" is also the site of a Pennsylvania historical marker.

 

 
1896 View of "Sellers' Hall"

 

The above information concerning "Sellers' Hall"
is courtesy of Thomas J. DiFilippo, author of
The History and Development of Upper Darby Township

The above picture of the "Sellers' Hall"
is courtesy of Tom Smith.


 

 

 

I just received this, thought I would share it.
Gracie

----- Forwarded Message ----
From: "Wjmcdevitt@aol.com" <Wjmcdevitt@aol.com>
To: g.winters@sbcglobal.net
Sent: Thursday, October 8, 2009 8:49:39 AM
Subject: Sellers Hall

Dear Gracie:

Thanks for your recent e-mail about your interest
in saving Sellers Hall.

I am the president of Friends of Sellers Hall, a
Pennsylvania nonprofit corporation that was set up to channel the efforts
to save this important building. Tim Sellers is chairman of the board, and
Coleman Sellers is also a board member.

To date, we have applied for 501(c)(3) status with
the IRS so that we can offer contributors a tax exemption for their
contributions. We have also moved forward and re-tarped the roof and added
ventilating louvres to halt the deterioration of the building. We are presenting
tomorrow a proposed long-term lease to the owners - the Archdiocese of
Philadelphia and St. Alice parish - that will give us possession and enable us
to restroe and preseve the property as a house museum.

I will contact you again in the near future
and let you know how you can help in the effort to save and restore Sellers
Hall.

Thanks again for your interest.

Bill
McDevitt, President
Friends
of Sellers Hall

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GRACIE, thank you for sharing.

We have some links about them, but, not much on any place to send contributions. I will add this letter you sent.

I would also be interested in Coleman or Tim's emails, to see if one of them would be interested in doing the dna test.
http://www.familytreedna.com/group-join.aspx?Group=Sellers

OR if hardship, we could find a sponser.
We don't have much on this line of SELLERS that so many of us are suppose to link to.

http://www.sellers-sellars-sollars-zellars.net/sellers_dna_results.htm

Feel free to give my email to either.
marie, iowa

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