LAWRENCE CO, MS (made in December 22, 1814, from the older county of Marion
By act of January 5, 1819, it contributed of its eastern area to form the county of Covington, and February 12th, of the same year, it surrendered to Marion County the northern half of township 5, ranges 17 and 18; in 1870, it contributed of its western area to form the county of Lincoln and in 1906, a part of its territory was detached in the formation of Jefferson Davis County.

lays next to Its northern boundary is the old Choctaw boundary line of 1805, separating it from Copiah and Simpson counties on the north, Jefferson Davis County is on the east, Marion and Walthall counties on the south, and Lincoln County,

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CK LIVINGSTON CO, KY

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1820 LAWRENCE CO, MS
60  9   7           Moore               John F        1     2     0     1     1     0     2     2     0     1     0      0       0       0      0    0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
60  10  7           Hart                John B        0     2     0     0     0     1     0     0     1     0     1      0       0       0      0    3     1     0     0     5     0     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
60  11  9           Hart                John          1     1     0     1     0     0     0     2     0     0     1      0       0       0      0    0     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
60  12  8           Palmer              William       2     1     0     1     0     0     2     0     0     1     0      0       0       0      0    2     1     0     1     3     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
60  13  8           Smith               Stephen       4     2     1     0     0     1     2     1     0     1     0      0       0       0      0    0     0     0     0     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
60  14  7           Jones               Thomas        1     0     2     2     0     0     1     2     0     0     0      0       0       0      0    0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
ANN SELLERS, PAGE 60=000000-00001-0 = FEMALE 
60  15  8           Sellers             Ann           0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     1      0       0       0      0    2     2     0     2     0     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0

FEMALE OVER 45 = BEF 1775
NO KIDS
6 MALE SLAVES
1 FEMALE SLAVE
60 16 8 Burney Simon 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
60  17  8           Slaughter           John          1     2     0     0     1     0     0     2     0     0     1      0       0       0      0    0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
60  18  8           Brown               William       1     1     0     1     0     0     0     2     0     0     0      0       0       0      0    0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
60  19  8           Brown               Daniel        0     0     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0      0       0       0      0    0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
60  20  8           Sorrels             Allen         2     0     0     1     0     0     1     0     0     1     0      0       0       0      0    0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0

 

 

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Early Soutwest Mississippi Territory -

A Complete History of Methodism
. TOBIAS GIBSON - AREAS OF MINISTRY AND CHURCH MEMBERS

Mr. Gibson crossed Big Black and visited the settlements around Warrenton, on the waters of Bogue de Sha and Big Bayou. Here he found another branch of the Gibson family, where Mr. Gibson would retire in later years. The first members of the church in Warrenton [Warren Co., MS] were Stephen Gibson, William Lewis, and Jonas Griffing, who built" a plain but commodious house for public worship, about one and a half miles east of Warrenton, which was long known as "Hopewell" in Warren County. Hopewell was kept as a place of worship until 1822. The settlement being barred on the west by the Mississippi River, had extended eastward until it became necessary to build a more central church. They selected a narrow oak ridge of thin land, called Red Bone in order to distinguish it from the cane fields. They built a plain log church about 1814 on land owned by Moses Evans, and called it Bethel (the dates look weird, but are, according to the book, correct).

At Bethel: John Sellers lived nearby and served as class leader. He was the brother of Rev. Samuel Sellers. Members who joined were Thomas Galloway, Charles Henderson, Russell Smith, Jonathon Guice, George Selser, and the Helms. About 1832 the log church was succeeded by a commodious frame building, and much later a substantial brick edifice. Even though the Federal soldiers vandalized and defaced and destroyed much of its furniture, Bethel continued to grow.

About 1823 a little class was organized higher up on Big Bayou, known as Gibson's Schoolhouse, built by Hon. James Gibson, Tobias' nephew. It was succeeded six or eight years later by another school and church by Lum's Campground, and by Asbury Church. In 1824, another was built near Bogue de Sha at the ample dwelling place of a venerable Christian lady named Hyland.

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THE LOST CONFERENCE

The next Conference was scheduled for Pine Ridge just north of Natchez on November 16, 1815 at the home of William Foster. There is no record that the Conference was held that year. It was called the lost Conference. A year before this book was published, the author found a living witness who said that the Conference was held at Adam's Camp-ground in Amite county. The Adams, White, Felder and other families in that region who had known something of campmeetings in South Carolina decided to have one in their new country. Ira
Byrd and Jonathan Kemp, favored the idea, along with Samuel Sellers, so it was held.

When he accepted the post in Mississippi he traveled with Ashley Hewit from Milledgeville, Georgia where they met in January of 1816.

John Lane traveled the last 250 miles of his journey alone, once meeting a Christian lady who insisted he take $20 to help on his trip. He made his way to Washington to begin his duties. He was nearly six feet tall, large size, well developed, head large and features perfect, with lustrous hazel eyes, sparkling teeth and full lips. The author says Lane was decidedly handsome and very intelligent.

That year Mr. Sellers became afflicted and so feeble he could not do his job, and only a few years later he died.

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William and Rachel Foster hosted the next Conference October 10, 1816.
FINANCIAL REPORT
Samuel Sellers had received $81..Appropriated........................... 19.00

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MISSISSIPPI CONFERENCE NOVEMBER, 1814
The Mississippi Conference assembled at Rev. John Ford's house in Marion County, west of Pearl River on Nov. 14,1814. Samuel Sellers was President and William Winans was re-elected as Secretary. Also present were Richmond Nolley, Thomas Griffin, Thomas A. King, John I.E. Byrd, John Schrock, and Elisha Lott.
It was difficult in the best of times to supply ministers and congregations with hymn books, as they had to come by way of the Atlantic to the ports of the gulf coast, and then be conveyed to the interior in any available way, but during the war, it was impossible to get them. The Conference appointed Samuel Sellers to make a selection of suitable hymns and publish them in pamphlet form for the use of the ministers and their flocks. The manuscript was completed and placed in the hands of the publisher in time to be ready by the meeting of the Conference Nov. 10, 1816. The publisher delayed in getting the books ready, and released the Conference from the debt. "Seller's Selection of Hymns and Spiritual Songs" was broadcast over the land eventually. The Conference completed in two days, and agreed to meet at Pine Ridge, six or seven miles north of Natchez, on Nov. 16, 1815.
The appointments were:

Mississippi District- Samuel Sellers, P.E.

1814
Thomas Griffin and Simon Gentry had no report that year, or it was lost, so statistics were unavailable. The writer, John Jones, was a lad when he first met Thomas Griffin. His moving, melting, subduing songs, prayers and sermons yet resounded in his ears, and thrilled Jones' heart at the time of this writing. The height of his ambition was to sing like Samuel Sellers, Thomas Griffin, and James Griffing. The first person Jones ever saw shouting at church was a rather elegant looking lady who was overcome be Thomas Griffin's songs.
Elsewhere in Louisiana, Samuel Sellers was seen. There lived in the region of the Attakapas on the island in Berwick's Bay, a cultivated lady by the name of Rice. She was considered a Christian lady but had been misled about Methodists and was prejudiced against them, and opposed to emotional religion. She determined to hear Sellers preach, regardless of her distrust, as preachers were rare there. She said she received no blessing from the sermon. Then Sellers began to sing and strange feelings stirred in her heart. Mrs. Rice was said to run a brilliant race as a feeling Christian, after that.

Mrs. Rice had a most congenial companion in the person of Mrs. Martha Skinner, who lived in the town of Teche, not far from the town of Franklin. The houses of these elect ladies were the houses of the early itinerants. The traveling preachers were always welcomed in their homes.

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1813 APPOINTMENTS

The Nov. 1st 1813 Conference was held in Newet Vick's home with the families of the Baldridges, Marbles, and Formans helping with the preachers' horses and supplies. It was attended by Samuel Sellers, John Phipps, Miles Harper, William Winans, Lewis Hobbs, Thomas Griffin and John S. Ford. A letter from the Bishops who could not attend appointed Samuel Sellers president. Rules for the conference were adopted.

The treasury was looked into by the committee, and reported $202.18, which was divided pro rata among the deficient preachers, which left $39.18, $30 of which was voted to William Winans to help in on the New Orleans Circuit. They were to do "a rousing business" on a very small capital. The appointments by President Sellers and his counsel Miles Harper, and
Secretary William Winans that year were:

Mississippi District- Samuel Sellers, P.E.

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SAMUEL SELLERS, JOHN PHIPPS, GEORGE A. COLBERT, and ELISHA LOTT

Samuel Sellers had traveled here in 1810, then one on the Barren Circuit in Kentucky, the other on Nollichuckie, on Holston Circuit. He returned to Mississippi where he presided as elder for four years. Sellers was of medium size, neatly put up, handsomely developed and capable of hard labor and endurance. He was of light complexion and hair sandy. His style of preaching was Wesleyan, his manner warm and exciting. He would pause about halfway
through a sermon and put his hand over half his face and one ear. When asked why, he could not tell. The author notes that many ministers of the same generation had the same habit. He was an excellent leader until Oct. 10, 1816 when he resigned the position to Bishop Robert R. Roberts.

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GREENVILLE AND THE FIRST MISSISSIPPI CONFERENCE

The first meeting of the Mississippi Conference was held at Spring Hill in Jefferson County on Nov. 1, 1813. The appointments were as follow:

Mississippi District- Samuel Sellers, P.E.

THE 1809 WESTERN CONFERENCE

The next Western Conference for 1810 met at Cincinnati, OH on Sept. 30, 1809. Bishop McKendree, preachers WIlliam Burke, Learner Blackman, and others of great renown preached powerful sermons of hard-fought battles in the field.

Appointments were:

Mississippi District- John McClure, P.E.
Natchez- William Houston, Miles Harper
WIlkinson- Isaac Quinn Claiborne, Samuel Sellers

Two of the above, Miles Harper and Samuel Sellers were destined to play a conspicuous part in Mississippi Methodism in later years. Harper was admitted to the Conference in 1804, and had traveled five years. He was medium sized, compactly built, well proportioned, of attractive personal appearance and capable of great endurance, a natural orator, with a voice that was "round, full, clear and distinct, and unusually pathetic," but "bold and intrepid" in
the discharge of his duties.
The last five years had been called the Great Revival for Methodist and Presbyterian itinerants through Kentucky and Tennessee. The two denominations drew up an agreement which they called "the Christian union", which did not suit Mr. Harper at all. He thought the union league was made use of to turn over an undue share of the patronage and fruits of those revivals that swept through the area to the Presbyterian Church, and he basically went against them by preaching the Methodist doctrine, no matter what either church said or
did. Eventually the union was dissolved anyway, and Harper became conspicuous for the stand he had taken for the Methodist Church.

Of Samuel Sellers, the author says he will tell us later in the book.

COMPLETE INDEX
http://www.rootsweb.com/~msswterr/brenb.htm

CK LIVINGSTON CO, KY

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1820

1830

1840

1850

1860

1870 LAWRENCE CO, MS

Sellers, Jas 41 M W farmer $750 $145 Miss
1043 Brown, P. S. 34 M W miller $120 Miss
1044 Sanford, Derrell 56 M W farmer $420 $125 SC
1045 Bethea, Jno A. 55 M W farmer $1075 $690 SC