MARGARET MOUNCE

        From:
             "Patrick Wood" <swtgrass@amaesd-net.com>

A History of the Daniel Boone National Forest by Robert F. Collins, 1975

        Tuckahoe was the brother of Cornblossom and the son of Chickamaugan Chief
Doublehead. After the Treaty of Sycamore Shoals, Chief Doublehead and his wife,
accompanied by Cornblossom and her brother Tuckahoe, moved to Hines' Cave, in what
we know as Wayne County Kentucky today. This treaty required all Cherokees to leave
the country north of the Cumberland River. Jacob Troxel, or Big Jake, was assigned to
work with the Indians of the Upper Cumberland River. He made friends with a young Cherokee
brave named Tuckahoe after he reached the old French trading post at Vincennes which
was the center of the western Indian trade. After their journey of about 200 miles
Big Jake and young Tuckahoe came to Tuckahoe's home where Big Jake met Chief Doublehead
and was received by the chief with great respect and ceremony due a distinguished visitor.
        Not long after the close of the Revolutionary War, John Mounce and family moved
to a homestead located at the mouth of Rock Creek on the Big South Fork of the Cumberland
River. Mounce had two beautiful daughters. Tuckahoe, fell in love with one of them,
Margaret Mounce. The young couple thought it would be romantic if she were taken by
Tuckahoe in an elopement. After several hours Margarets' sister told her father that
Tuckahoe had stolen Margaret. John very upset, accompanied by  Jones a neighbor,
pursued them for many miles. He finally overtook them near the present town of
Monticello, Fearing her fathers' reaction Margaret threw her arms around Tuckahoe
to protect him from harm, thus preventing her father from shooting Tuckahoe. Soon
after this event, John Mounce gave his consent to the marriage of his daughter
Margaret to the handsome Tuckahoe. Tuckahoe and Margaret Mounce were married
and lived at Che-ry Fork, now Helenwood, Tennessee.
        The most prized possession of Chief Doublehead's tribe was a secret silver mine
located somewhere adjacent to the Cumberland River in the general area of today's
McCreary, Pulaski, and Wayne counties, Kentucky. The location of this silver mine
was a tribe secret which had never been revealed to a white man. A white trader,
Han Blackberne, learned of this mine and was determined to find it. He offered to
sell young Tuckahoe a fine rifle decorated With silver, together with a fancy powder
orn and a fringed bullet pouch for a small amount of silver from the mine. Tuckahoe
eagerly agreed. As he went to the secret mine for the silver, he was followed by
Blackberne and a hired laborer by the name of Monday. As Tuckahoe was digging the
silver to pay for his new rifle, the two white men appeared. While remonstrating with
Blackberne for following him, he laid down a pick which he had been using. Monday,
a simple-minded individual, grabbed the pick and struck Tuckahoe on the head killing
him instantly. Monday then threw Tuckahoe's body down a deep crevice between two large
rocks and covered it with leaves, dead branches and loose rock. He and Blackberne then
started digging for silver.
        In the meantime Princess Cornblossom learned of the deal of Tuckahoe with Blackberne
and, suspecting that the trader planned to follow him to the mine, also started for
the mine as rapidly as her little legs would carry her in an attempt to stop her
brother before he reached the mine site. On approaching the mine she saw the tracks of Blackberne and Monday which confirmed her suspicions. Creeping forward cautiously she
arrived at the mine where she observed the trader Blackberne resting under a tree and
his hired hand Monday digging the silver. While her brother was not in sight, her
worst fears were confirmed by the sight of his new rifle leaning against a tree
and large pools of blood scattered about the mine where Tuckahoe had been killed.
Realizing what had happened, Princess Cornblossom dashed forward, grabbed the rifle,
horn and pouch and sped down the trail so swiftly that Blackberne and Monday were
unable to catch her. Fortunately a violent thunderstormapproached on the south and
west on the headwaters of Poncho Creek and along the Little South Fork, which made
further tracking impossible. The Princess, having reached the top of the mountain,
quickly built a shelter at the site of a fallen tree, picked wild grapes and chestnuts
for her evening meal, and eathered the storm through the night in comfort, but with a
heavy heart at the death of her brother Tuckahoe.
        Resolved to avenge his death, as well as to guard the secret of the tribe's
mine, she planned to kill both Blackberne and Monday before they could reveal
the location of the mine to any other white man.At the break of dawn she knew that
some of her tribe would be searching for her. Sounding the tribal distress call
she was answered immediately by two braves less than two miles distant. Knowing
that Blackberne and Monday would probably head for their trading station near
the Fonde settlement (near what is now Williamsburg, in Whitley County, Kentucky)
and that Poncho Creek was a raging torrent as a result of the thunderstorm
it appeared Blackberne and Monday would be most likely to cross the creek at
Turtleneck Ford. This ford (now called Cracker's Neck) is located about three miles
west of the present town of Stearns, Kentucky.
        Princess Comblossom concealed herself on the steep hillside overlooking the
ford, posted the two braves in concealment near the creek, and awaited the appearance
of Blackberne and Monday. After a long wait she saw a glint of a shiny buckle and a
fancy coat and another from the handle of a hunting knife and knew that the white
men were approaching. Carefully renewing the priming in the pan of Tukahoe's fine
flintlock rifle, she rested the heavy barrel in the fork of a dogwood tree and waited.
Arriving at Poncho Creek and finding it in flood Blackberne dismounted to inspect the
ford before trying to cross. Sighting down the long sleek barrel, glistening with bear
oil, Princess Comblossom took careful aim and pressed the trigger. As the shot sounded
lackbern fell to earth dead of a bullet through his heart. The two braves quickly
tomahawked Monday, disemboweled both bodies, filled them with rocks and threw them
in the raging Poncho Creek. At last the death of the brave Tuckahoe was revenged and
the secret of the tribe's silver mine was again safe.

A History of the Daniel Boone National Forest by Robert F. Collins, 1975