RECORDS PERTAINING TO THE SELLERS FAMILY

 

OF BRUNSWICK COUNTY, N.C.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compiled By

 

 

 

James. I. Marlowe, Ph. D.


Table of Contents

                                                    Page No.

 

Preface

Sellers Families in Southeastern North Carolina         1

Early Sellers in Isle of Wight Co., Va.                 2

Early Sellers in Chowan and Bertie Cos., N.C            4

Sellers in Northampton Co., N.C                         7

Relationships Between N.C. and Va. Sellers              9

Sellers of Edgecombe Co., N.C                          10

Sellers in Virginia North of the York River            11

Benjamin Sellers’ Children Migrate to Brunswick Co.    12

Matthew Sellers, Son of Benjamin                       15

Benjamin Sellers, Son of Benjamin                      20

Joel Sellers, Son of Benjamin                          25

Jechonias Sellers, Son of Benjamin                     26

Penelope Sellers Robbins, Daughter of Benjamin         27

Simon Sellers, Son of Benjamin                         29

Elisha Sellers, Son of Benjamin                        31

Matthew Sellers, Son of Elisha                         33

Samuel Sellers, Son of Elisha                          35

William Sellers, Son of Elisha                         38

Willets Sellers, Son of Elisha                         40

Benjamin Sellers of Waccamaw and Shallotte             42

Thomas Sellers, Son of Elisha                          45

Elisha Sellers of Lockwoods Folly                      47

Samuel J. Sellers and His Children                     51

Individuals Named John Sellers                         60

Individuals Named James Sellers                        64

Nathaniel Sellers                                      68

Lewis Sellers                                          69

Willets Sellers of Town Creek                          70

Ethelred or Eldred Sellers                             72

Sellers Families of Town Creek                         74

The Family of Amelia Sellers, Columbus Co.             77

Sion Sellers of Horry County                           81

Descendants of Benjamin and Their Dispersion           83

Abraham Sellers                                        85

William H. Sellers                                     88

 

 

Figures

 

Fig. 1. Map of Northampton and Bertie Cos., N.C.,

          and Adjacent Virginia                          6

Fig. 2. Map of the Lower Cape Fear Region              89

 

Table

 

Table 1. Children and Grandchildren of Benjamin Sellers 13


Preface

 

 

Dear Sellers Kin, Present and Future:

 

This compilation of information from the public record pertains to the history of the Sellers family of Brunswick County, North Carolina. Specifically, it is concerned with the descendants of Benjamin Sellers, who died in Edgecombe County, N.C., in 1761 and whose children appeared shortly afterward in Brunswick County. The information was compiled during my research into the lineage of Samuel J. Sellers, from whom I am descended, and is essentially a by-product of an effort originally intended to identify Samuel’s father. As it turned out, in order to achieve this goal it was necessary to account for all of the Brunswick County Sellers from the time of earliest record to about 1850. In the process of this accounting, many records were examined and much information was col­lected. That information is presented here for the benefit of other researchers of the Sellers family and associated lines, to be used judiciously as discussed below.

 

In the century following their arrival in the Waccamaw River drainage area, the Sellers of Brunswick and nearby counties were prolific and shared in common the use of favored given names. As a result, records of the period may appear confusing or even contra­dictory when one attempts to find information on a particular ind­ividual. As an approach to sorting out a seemingly hopeless tangle of documentary trails of various people with similar names, who were all living in the same period and general geographic area, I attempted to compile biographical profiles of these individuals. In many cases I was able to tell how many individuals with the same name were represented in the record. In several cases, it was possible to determine that some bearers of a given name departed the region at certain dates, while others remained. It was also usually possible to determine specific areas of the county in which various branches of the family lived. Most importantly, previously-unsuspected relationships among some individuals became apparent as a result of trying to account for the chronology and whereabouts of all the Sellers in the county during that period.

 

Information for the profiles came from census, deed, and court records, and was collected almost entirely from the original doc­uments. Information obtained from other researchers is identified as such and the sources are cited. The data presented in the profiles are reproduced as they were found in the records. The profiles them­selves have been assembled according to my identification of the individuals involved in each item of information. Usually, this identification was based on such things as location of property, age of individuals, names of neighbors and other associates, and apparent inheritances of property. Therefore, the composition of the profiles is interpretive to various degrees, while the data from which they are composed are objective and as factual as the original documents.


The data base includes:

1) all deed records in Brunswick, Columbus and Horry Counties indexed under the name Sellers to about 1870 (with the exception of numerous deeds relating to real estate spec­ulations by Elisha Sellers and Thomas G. Sellers in the mid-l800’s);

2) all census records for the same region, through 1910;

3) minutes of the Brunswick County court through 1868 and the Columbus County court through 1840;

4) wills, administrations, and estates papers of the above counties;

5) miscellaneous documents relating to the same counties and to Bladen County in the State Archives; and

6) various military and pension records in the State and National Archives.

 

In addition, research on the Virginia and northeastern North Carolina origins of the Sellers family was done in the Virginia Archives, the D.A.R. library in Washington, D.C., and historical collections in various Virginia libraries.

 

The compilation includes results of work done by other researchers who have traced various branches of the Sellers family. Much of the interpretive comment that accompanies the profiles on Matthew and Benjamin Sellers, sons of Benjamin of Edgecombe County, is a result of long-term correspondences with Fran Laaker, of San Diego, and Col. Charles Schweizer, of Edwardsville, Illinois, respectively.

 

This is not an exhaustive compilation and it should not be re­garded as a basic information source. It is presented as a guide and a labor- and time-saving reference. Neither is it an attempt to bring all the identified lines of descent up to date. It does, how­ever, establish several lines of descent which can be brought into the present century through research into birth, marriage and death rec­ords in the county courthouses. Anyone utilizing data and interpret­ations contained in this compilation should consult the original documents in order to verify the information for his or her own use.

 

 

I have assembled this material through many hundreds of hours of effort, over a period of about twelve years. It has, for me, lent a great deal of clarity to what was at the outset a very murky understanding of the beginnings of the Sellers family in Brunswick County. I hope that it will be useful to others in establishing their connections with this large and venerable clan.

 

 

 

James I. Marlowe, Ph. D.

 

Manassas, Virginia

January 1, 1986


Sellers Families in Southeastern North Carolina

 

 

This research project is concerned with the origin and descendants of Benjamin Sellers, who died in Edgecombe County, N.C., in 1761. All of his known children moved to Brunswick County, N.C., where the Sellers clan became numerous and wide­spread and from whence waves of Sellers emigrants moved out into new areas of settlement as our nation grew.

 

There were also other groups of Sellers families in the region. Prior to the arrival of the Edgecombe County group, families with the surname Sellers lived in southern Bladen County and on the Black River in New Hanover County. Given names and property associations suggest that these people had Scottish origins and may have been associated with the settlement of the upper Cape Fear River region by the Highlander immigrations of the mid-1700’s.

 

Other groups of Sellers families were present in Sampson and Duplin Counties at the time of the Edgecombe group’s arrival in Brunswick or shortly thereafter. None of the presently available evidence indicates that there were close connections between these people and the children of Benjamin of Edgecombe. However, there is evidence suggesting that some of the Sellers in Sampson County may have had origins in the region of Nash and Orange Counties; and records of those counties indicate probable earlier ties with Benjamin’s line of ancestry in Northampton County and southern Virginia.

 

With the exception of profiles assembled on Abraham Sellers and William H. Sellers, who lived in Brunswick County but appear to have had origins in Sampson County, the above groups are not discussed in this compilation.


Early Sellers in Isle of Wight County, Virginia

 

The earliest mention of the name Sellers or its spelling variants in Virginia records the transportation of William Seller by Christopher Reynolds to Isle of Wight County, on November 25, 1657. Reynolds’ grant was described as being on Cypress Creek, adjacent to property held by “Chr. Reynolds, dcd.” Cypress Creek drains into the James River just west of present-day Smithfield, Virginia, and is a branch of Pagan Creek, along which much of the early settlement of Isle of Wight County took place.

 

On January 9, 1667, a William Seller purchased blacksmith tools from the estate of "Captain Fulgham” in Isle of Wight County. This was probably the same William Seller whose land was mentioned as adjoining the property of Anthony Fulgham, whose will was recorded in Isle of Wight County on October 14, 1678. Anthony Fulgham owned extensive lands at the head of the Western Branch of the Nansemond River (now a dammed lake) at that time. He also had land on Pagan Point Bay, on the James, and 1000 acres “on a branch of the Blackwater”. William Sellers’ land therefore could have been in any of those localities. Unfortunately, land descriptions of the time were not sufficiently detailed to facilitate the location of the land today. Descriptions were usually no more than refer­ences to adjacent property owners.

 

Will Seller was one of the petitioners for the release of William West, who was arrested for participation in Bacon’s Rebel­lion. He signed the petition, which was dated October, 1677, with an (x).

 

On March 18, 1686/87, a John Sellers was a witness to the will of John Moore in Isle of Wight County. This John Moore was a witness to a land sale on Powells Swamp in 1689 and therefore probably lived near that body of water. Unfortunately, the name does not appear on modern maps and the stream’s location is not now known. John Moore’s estate was settled in 1692 but a younger John Moore, of Lower Parish (south of Pagan Creek) sold land that had originally been patented to an earlier John Moore on Indian Creek. This sale took place on April 5, 1699. Indian Branch on modern maps is a small tributary of the Nottaway River in what is now Southampton County.

 

On September 5, l7l4, John Seller, of Isle of Wight County, sold 100 acres of land to Charles Jones. The deed contains the statement that the land had originally belonged to John’s father, William Seller, who was given it by one Josiah Harrison on December 9, l684. The deed of gift was referred to as then being in the county records. It does not appear to exist today, however, and no description of this land has been found. John Seller and “Eliz.” Seller signed the deed with (x)’s.

 


In 1710, the Governor’s Council of Virginia passed a reso­lution prohibiting settlement between the Nottaway and Meherrin Rivers. Settlers moved into the area anyway, and by a few years later, no official barrier to immigration existed. South Quay, a small settlement on the Blackwater River, appeared on maps as early as 1657. By 1701, it was a landing for shipping from the North Carolina sounds, and a trading post there was run by one John Cotton. The settlement was located approximately four miles north of modern Franklin, in Southampton County. By 1714, hundreds of families with uncertain land grants were living in the region west of the Blackwater and Chowan Rivers. At the time, North Carolina was granting land as far north as the wset side of the Nottaway, which today is entirely in Virginia. A population described as a “loose and disorderly people” flocked into,, the contested zone between the two colonies. (Paramour, 1978). *

 

On October 22, 1722, a group of residents of the area who described themselves as “Outward Inhabitance of the County of Isle of Wyght” signed a petition requesting the Governor of Virginia, Hugh Drysdale, to place customs officers at the Virginia - North Carolina border on the fork of the Nottaway and Blackwater Rivers, in order to encourage shipping to come up those streams. John Seler was among the signers of the petition, who stated that they lived convenient to the Blackwater and Nottaway, but a great distance from where ships come for trading (Virginia Calender of State Papers, Vol. 1, p. 204).

 

In 1731, a William Seller owned land on the south side of the Nottaway River in Isle of Wight County. This land was mentioned as adjoining a grant made to Richard Vick on June 11 of that year. On June 23, William Seller received a patent to 200 acres in the same area. On July 26, also in 1731, William Sellers appraised the estate of John Gutteridge in Isle of Wight County. No records describing the location of the lands of Sellers, Vick or Gutteridge (or Goodrich) in that region have been found.

 

William Sellers received another patent to land in Isle of Wight County in l742. This land must have been west of the Blackwater River, as it was described in a 1765 sale of land by John Cobb in Southampton County (4/357). Southampton was separated out from Isle of Wight, with the Blackwater as the dividing line, in l749.

 

 

 

*  Parramore, Thomas, 1979, Southampton County, Virgina: University Press of Virginia, P.O. Box 3608, Univ. Sta., Charlottesville, Virginia 22903


Early Sellers in Chowan and Bertie Counties, North Carolina

 

Matthew Sellers lived in North Carolina near the Virginia border, near present-day Murfreesboro, in Hertford County. Documents relating to Matthew exist in the surviving records of Chowan, Bertie and Northampton Counties, all of which were formed during his residence in the area.

 

On July 15, 1717, Matthew Seller bought 50 acres on Reedy Swamp in Chowan County from Benjamin Foremen, Sr., planter, of Albemarle County. The land was adjacent to land of John Blackburn and Sharer, and the deed was witnessed by John Drew and Robert Sharer (l/471). Albemarle County had ceased to exist in 1670; however, the name evidently continued in use by residents of the area for as long as forty years later. On May 4, 1719, Matthew Seller witnessed a deed from John Blackburn to Robert Shered, both “of Albemarle County” (1/707). The land described in that deed was on the south side of the Meherrin River, on Great Creek. Thus, we have the general location of Matthew Seller’s land.

 

In the 1721 tax list for Chowan County Matthew Seller, 1 poll, was listed with 50 acres of land, presumably the property he bought from Benjamin Foreman.

 

In 1722, Bertie County was formed from part of Chowan County and the land where Matthew lived was incorporated into the new county. On April 1, 1724, Matthew was granted 170 acres on the south side of the Meherrin, adjacent to his own land. On November 10, 1724, he witnessed a deed between William Ricks and Isaac Ricks, for land on the south side of Kirby’s Creek and Reedy Branch (A/236). On February 1, 1725, Matthew received a grant of 192 acres on the south side of the Meherrin River at “Patty’s Delight.” On November 9 of the same year, Matthew Sellers and Catherine Sellers witnessed a sale from John Nelson to Joseph Boon, for land on the south side of the Meherrin (B/57).

 

Matthew sold 100 acres on the south side of the Meherrin at “Redy Swamp” on November 8, 1726, to Timothy Hind. This was part of the 170 acres patented to him in 1724. The deed was witnessed by Richard Washington and John Colson (B/2l4). On August 7, 1727, Matthew “Sceller” sold to John Sceller 100 acres on the south side of the Meherrin at “Patty’s Delight”, part of his 192-acre patent of 1725. Witnesses were Daniel O’Quinn and Henry Turner (B/314).

 

On April 1, 1728, Matthew witnessed a land sale from Robert Sherwood to John Mahha, 100 acres “on Mill Path” (B/413). This was probably the same land that Matthew bought on December 19 of the following year from a John Mohere, for 20 barrels of tar (C/313). In that deed, the land was described as being on the south side of the “Moratuck River at a branch of Kerby Creek”, part of a patent for 6k0 acres granted to Robert Sherwood in 1719. This was a mistake, as the Roanoke was sometimes called the Moratock and we know from modern maps that Kirby’s Creek is a branch of the Meherrin. John Drew and James Mumford were witnesses.


On August 7, 1738, Matthew witnessed a deed for land in the seine area between Michael Hanley and wife and John Johnson. Benjamin Sellers was a co-witness (E/3l3). On August 31 of that year, Matthew witnessed a sale of 210 acres “in Maherring Woods adjoining Joseph Boone” from Jospeh Boone to Humphrey Pryer. Benjamin Hill and John Dew (sic) were also witnesses (E/517).

 

John Drew was resident in the lower Meherrin River area as early as 1711, when the Virginia-North Carolina Border Commission fought its way through the swamps and brush to his house (Parramore, 1978).

 

Matthew Sellers witnessed a deed from Joseph Strickland to Andrew Ireland on July 6, 1739 (F/55), but was deceased by August, 1740, when the court appointed Catherine Sellers the administrator of her deceased husband Matthew Sellers’ estate. An inventory of Matthew’s property was submitted to the court in the September, 1740, session.

 

Matthew’s son Benjamin had moved to Edgecombe County by the February, 1740, session of the Bertie County court, as is indicated by a deed from “Benjamin Sellers of Edgecombe County” to Benjamin Hill, selling 50 acres of land on the south side of the “Meherin River” and Kirby Creek that “my father Matthew Sellers bought of Benjamin Foreman whereon my mother now lives and the other 50 acres which my father bought of John Mohere and also 170 acres patented in my father’s names (sic) all the said lands joining together.” Witnesses were John Campbell, Christopher Lahey, and Samuel Mirret (F/195). The deed is not dated. It seems safe to conclude from the language of this document that Matthew Sellers was dead by the time of the February court; thus, he died sometime between July, 1739, and February, 1740.

 

 

John S(c)eller(s) was living in Bertie County in 1727, when he bought 100 acres of land from Matthew S(c)ellers on the south side of the Meherrin River at “Patty’s Delight” (B/314). It appears on the basis of geographical association that this was probably the John Seler who signed a petition to the Governor of Virginia in 1722, to establish a customs port on th Virginia-North Carolina border at the confluence of the Blackwater and Nottaway Rivers, in order to legalize and therefore to encourage shipping on those rivers, which connect with Albemarle Sound and the ocean. The petitioners described themselves as living “a great distance from where ships come for trading”, but convenient to the Blackwater and Nottaway. John Sellers was listed as a debtor to the estate or Francis Parker, which was inventoried in Bertie County in 1737.




Sellers in Northampton County, North Carolina

 

 

Northampton County, North Carolina, was formed from part of Bertie County in 1741. Numerous entries relating to Matthew Sellers and to other Sellers from southern Virginia occur in the existing records.

 

We know from Bertie Deed F/195, registered in the February, l740, court session, that Benjamin Sellers, then of Edgecombe County, was the son of Matthew Sellers, deceased, of Bertie County. In Northampton Deed 1/108, of December 22, 1743, “Benjamin Cellars, the son of Matthew Cellars, dec’d” was mentioned as the former owner of 270 acres on the south side of the Maherin River and the north side of Kerby’s Creek, in a sale from Benjamin Hill of Bertie County to Henry Sowerby of Northampton. Witnesses were Richard Pilent and Robert Bygrave.

 

On November 28, 1744, a George Sellers bought 150 acres on the south side of the Maherrin River, adjacent to Coreroy Swamp and the Miry Branch, and part of a patent to Thomas Boon (l/148). This must be Corduroy Swamp of modern maps, a stream some 7 to 8 miles long that drains into Kirby’s Creek.

 

The following summer, on May 28, 1745, an Arthur Sellers, of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, bought 190 acres on the southeast side of Coreroy Swamp, adjacent to Thomas Boon. George Sellers was a witness (1/195). There are numerous other entries for George and Arthur Sellers in the Coreroy Swamp-Wildcat Swamp-Miry Branch area of Northampton County. Several newcomers from southern Virginia are also recorded in deeds pertaining to the Sellers.

 

On February 7, 1756, George Sellars and Faithy Sellars his wife sold 150 acres, “my plantation on the south side of Corriroy Swamp”, joining Miry Branch. Arthur Sellars was a witness (2/283). Less than a month later, on March 5, 1756, Arthur Sellars sold 90 acres on Wildcat Swamp, the remaining part of his original pur­chase, joining Thomas Boone and Coreroy Swamp (2/3l4).

 

No further listings for George or Arthur Sellers occur in the Northampton County records. However, an Arthur Sellers, 1 poll, was entered on the Bertie County tax list for 1757. In one trans­action, dated December 29, 1747, a William Sellar was listed as a witness for George (1/337).

 

In the will of John Thomas, written in Southampton County, Virginia, on April 9, 1763, land “on which Arthur Sellers formerly dwelt” was bequeathed. In the will of George Gurley, Sr., written August 12, 1768, also in Southampton County, a daughter, Fathey Sellers, is mentioned. This must be George Sellers’ wife of the 1756 land sale in Northampton County, N. C. Probable connections among these families are indicated by the fact that George Gurley, Jr., was a witness to John Thomas’ will. Also, a Jesse Braswell was a witness to the will of George Gurley, Sr. It is probably not


a coincidence that William Brasswell purchased 100 acres from Arthur Sellers in Northampton in 1749 (1/398) and John Braswell purchased land adjoining George in 1754 (2/138).

 

An Arthur Sellers was a witness to the will of Henery Crumpton, in Bertie County, on January 11, 1735. This may have been a son of Matthew, or it may have been the same Arthur Sellers who bought land on Coreroy Swamp in 1745, and who was stated to be from Isle of Wight County, Virginia ( 1/195).

 

On March 12, 1753, George Sellers witnessed the purchase of land on Coreroy Swamp in Northampton County by Benjamin Cobb (2/109). Records of Southampton County, Virginia, show that the Cobb family there owned land that had been originally patented by William Sellers in 1733 (4/357). Thus, there is possibly a link through kinship or friendship between the Cobbs and the Sellers in both places. This possibility also suggests that George and Arthur Sellers were descendants, possibly children, of William Sellers of Southampton.

 


Relationships Between North Carolina and Virginia Sellers Families

 

 

William Sellers, who lived in Southampton County, Virginia, in the 1730’s, and Matthew and John Sellers, who lived in Bertie County, North Carolina, during the period 1725-1740, were contemp­oraries and associated with the same geographic region. Therefore, they may have been related to one another. This appears to be a definite possibility in the case of Matthew and John, who were neighbors on Kirby Creek.

 

The John Seller of the 1714 deed in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, was a son of William Seller of that county. Whether or not the John Seller of the 1722 petition in Isle of Wight County and the 1727 deed in Bertie County was the same individual, is not clear. If he was, a connection between Matthew and William the elder seems implicit.

 

George and Arthur Sellers may be a link between the two areas. Northampton County, North Carolina, and Southampton County;, Virginia, records indicate that these two people came from Virginia to North Carolina, where they took up lands close to those of Matthew Sellers, then deceased, and his son Benjamin. As the record shows that William owned land in Southampton County, and that George, at least, was a “former owner” of land in that county, it appears possible that George and Arthur were descendants of William. The fact that they moved to locations near Matthew’s former prop­erty, and therefore probably near families allied to Matthew’s, suggests that a close relationship existed between the two lines of Sellers. Perhaps Benjamin, son of Matthew, was a first cousin of George and Arthur. Further, there is evidence that an Arthur Sellers was resident in Bertie County in 1735, though there is no indication that he was a property owner.

 

John Sellers of the 1714 record in Isle of Wight County was probably considerably older than Matthew Sellers of Bertie County, as the name John Sellers was recorded as early as 1687. Hence, it is possible that John may have been Matthew’s father. If this should be true, then Matthew was a grandson of William Seller, the original immigrant.

 

To summarize, there appears to be considerable evidence that the Sellers of Southampton County, Virginia, and Northampton County, North Carolina, were related. As William Seller was the only individual of that-surname in the region during its original settlement, it seems very probable that all of the individuals discussed above were his descendants.

 


Sellers of Edgecombe County, North Carolina

 

 

By 1741, Benjamin Sellers, who was a son of Matthew Sellers and who was listed as a former landowner in Northampton County in 1743 (1/108), was living in Edgecombe County. Edgecombe was formed in 1741 from part of Northampton County. However, Benjamin’s first deed records in Edgecombe show that he was living on Swift Creek, some 40 miles southwest of the land on which he and Matthew had lived on Kirby Creek and the Meherrin River. On August 19, 1741, he bought 350 acres on the south side of Swift Creek (1/401). Several subsequent entries show that he was a party to or witnessed deeds in that area through 1758, when the name of Benjamin Sellers, Jr., also appeared as a witness (00/19).

 

On December 22, 1761, George Sellers, described as a resident of Edgecombe County, bought 650 acres of land on the north side of the Tar River, into which Swift Creek flows. William Dortch acted as a witness (1/323). This was the same George Sellers who sold out his property in Northampton County in 1756, as is demonstrated by his deed of sale of the same parcel on February 20, 1763. In that deed, George’s wife is named as “Fatha” (C/61).

 

Benjamin Sellers died early in 1761. His will, written on January 3, 1761, and proved in the March, 1761, court, and his estate settlement records tell us the names of seven children and his wife, Sarah. The will named his youngest son, Simon, to receive his wife’s share of the estate after her death; sons Elisha and Benjamin, to receive 5s each; and referred to the “remainder of his children, living with his wife.” William Dortch, who witnessed one of George Sellers’ deeds, was named executor. Cattren Sellers and Matthew Sellers were witnesses.

 

In the June, 1762, session of the Edgecombe County Court, Benjamin’s “orphans” Matthew, Jeconias and Joel chose their mother, Sarah, as their guardian. The court appointed Sarah as the guard­ian of Simon and Mary Sellers. In the April, 1764, session, the court was notified that Thomas Dixon had married Sarah, Benjamin’s widow. In the October, 1764, session, Joel Sellers was ordered bound out to Kindred Carter.

 

In view of the apparently immature age of Benjamin’s son Matthew at the date of the will, it seems probable that the Matthew who witnessed the will was another Individual. This may have been the same Matthew who witnessed a deed for a land sale on the north bank of Swift Creek to Thomas Dixon, on October 22, 1763 (C/140), as well as another sale in the same locality on October 25, 1764, with William Dortch (C/307).

 


Sellers Families in Virginia North of the York River

 

 

A Thomas Sellers owned land in Gloucester County, Virginia, near the head of Queens Creek, on October 8, 1762, as mentioned in a land patent of that date to William Elliott.

 

A Nicholas Sellers was transported to New Kent County by John Saxon, on October 24, 1701.

 

An individual named Sellers lived in King William County, St. Johns Parish, on the south side of the Mattaponi River on September 5, 1723, Sellers’ “old line” being mentioned in the des­cription of land patented to John Whitehead on that date. In 1712, “Sellers’ Race Ground” was mentioned as a landmark in the property description of John Higgason, in the same area, filed on April 26 of that year.

 

The above individual was possibly Jacob Sellers, who was granted

353 acres in King William County in April, 1703, was recorded on

the Quit Rent Roll there in 1704, and bought land there in 1722.

An estate settlement for Mary Sellers was recorded in King William

County in 1706 (Va. Mag. Hist. & Biog., vol. 25, p. 175).

 


Benjamin Sellers’ Children Migrate to Brunswick County

 

 

By 1769, all six of Benjamin’s identified sons and at least one daughter were present in Brunswick County, as evidenced by the tax list for that year. Elisha was the first to appear, being carried on the 1763 New Hanover County tax list. On the surviving earlier list, for 1755, no Sellers were listed. Brunswick County was set out from New Hanover County in 1764.

 

Records show that five of the brothers acquired land in the western part of Brunswick County, in the vicinity of the Waccamaw River and other nearby streams. Initially, the brothers lived in fairly close association, witnessing each other’s deeds. Later, some of them moved to other parts of the county or into South Carolina. Their descendants spread throughout the county and the region in succeeding years, and it is a rare native of Brunswick County today who is not connected in some way to the Sellers family.

 

Deeds and other records pertaining to the children of Benjamin Sellers are used to describe their residence in Brunswick County and later migrations, as presented in the following pages of this compilation.

 


Table 1

 

Children and Grandchildren of Benjamin (d. 1761) and Sarah

 

Sellers of Edgecombe County, North Carolina

 

 

1. Benjamin in. a) ____ Bryant

 b) Letitia ____

b. pr. 1740, d. 1817,

Brunswick Co., N.C.

Ch.: Jordan b. 1763, d. 1833

Sarah

Mary

Wright b. 1774, d. 1836+

Luke b. 1774-90, d. 1803

Levin b. 1774-90, d. 1809

Rhoda b. 1784, d. 1847

 

2. Elisha m. a)____

b)Sarah ____

c) Mary Willets

b. pr. 1740, d. ca. 1801,

Brunswick Co., N.C.

Ch.: Thomas b. ca. 1768, d. 185-

Matthew b. 176-, d. 184-

Willets b. ca. 1783, d. 185-

Sarah

Mary

William b. pr. 1780, d. 1815+

Ann

John Bryant b. ca. 1793, d. ca. 1813

  Benjamin b. 178-, d. 1835+

  Samuel b. 1788, d. 1854

*  Possibly a son, based in indirect evidence

 

3.       Matthew m. Ann Corbett

   b. 1743, d. 1807,

   Livingston Co., Ky.

Ch.: John m. 1807

Salome m. 1805

Mary m. 1809

Ann

Rhoda m. 1809

Samuel

Matthew Bacon b. 1800, Ky., d. 186-, La.


4.     Joel m. Amelia *

   b. 174-, d. 178-?,

   Brunswick Co., N.C.?

Ch.: Sion b. 1775, d. 185-

Elisha b. 1785, d. 185-

Joel b. 1787, d. 185-

Matthew b. 1780-84, d. 183-

* Names of wire and children

  conjectural, based on in-

  direct evidence

 

5. Jechonias

b. ca. 1747, d. 1813,

Brunswick Co., N.C.

 

6.     Mary Penelope m. Arthur Robbins

   b. ca. 1747, d.

Ch.:   Benjamin

Arthur b. 1765-6

Absalom

Jonathan

Son

Son

Daughter

Daughter

 

7. Simon m. a) _____

b) Winney Baker

b. ca. 1748, d. 1817,

Brunswick Co., N.C.

Ch.: Simon b. ?, d. 1819

     Effie

 

 

James Sellers*

b. pr. 1744, d. 179-,

Brunswick Co., N.C.

Ch.: James b. 176-, d. 183-

     Nathaniel b. 1765-74, d. 1826

     Lewis b. 1774-84, d. 183-

                  Ethelred b. 1770-75, d. 1834

                  Willets b. 1778, d. 185-

                  Son b. 1774-84

                  Son b. 1774-84

 

* Relation to Benjamin unknown, but is

possibly an older son. The names of

James’ children are conjectural, based

on indirect evidence.

 


Records Pertaining to Matthew Sellers, Son of Benjamin

 

 

Matthew Sellers was not of age at the time of his father’s death in 1761 but must have been more than 14, as he chose his mother as his guardian (Winslow, 1980). Therefore, he was probably born between 1741 and 1747. He acted as a chain carrier for his brother Elisha’s land survey on Starboard Swamp in December, 1769, and his name appeared on the 1769 tax list for Brunswick County.

 

Matthew was granted 300 acres on the White Marsh adjoining Christopher Addison on December 16, 1769. On September 4, 1770, he applied for 400 acres more on the southwest side of the White Marsh “a little below Coll. Drys line” and “including the improve­ment of Simeon Sellers”. Benjamin Sellers was a chain carrier for the latter survey, the grant for which was issued on April 18, 1771. On January 14, 1772, he sold 400 acres on the White Marsh to Jethro Robbins (A/151) and a few days later, on January 19, 1772, he sold 400 acres on the White Marsh to his brother Joel Sellers (A/149). In September of the same year, he sold 150 acres more in the same area to James Corbitt (A/153), his father-in-law.

 

The latter relationship is indicated in a Bladen County deed in which Ann Sellers, wife of Matthew Sellers, acquired 150 acres of land on the southwest branch of the Waccamaw, below the White Marsh and below Richland Branch, from her father James Corbett of Brunswick County, on May 5, 1773. This deed was witnessed by Simon and Ann Sellers and Arthur Robbins (Bladen Misc. Rec./480).

 

Edgecombe County records show that Matthew purchased his father’s former land on Swift Creek from his brother Simon, who had inherited it, on March 4, 1772 (2/183; data from Fran Laaker). * Thomas Dixon, his stepfather, was a witness.

 

Matthew bought more land on the White Marsh from his brother Benjamin in January, 1773 (B/8), and sold 150 acres more in the same area, again to James Corbett, in December of the same year (B/l7). A month later, Matthew sold 300 acres on the White Marsh to his brother Benjamin (B/l8). Matthew evidently resided in Bladen County during part of this period, as he is listed as a resident of that county in an Edgecombe County deed, recording the sale of his father’s former land on Swift Creek on November 29, 1774 (3/302; data from Fran Laaker). On May 13, 1778, he witnessed a deed of sale of 100 acres on the west side of the White Marsh by James Sellers (B/105).

 

 

Winslow, Raymond A., 1980, Estates Records, in North Carolina Research -- Genealogy and Local History; Leary, H.F.M., and Stirewalt, M. R., eds.; N.C. Geneal. Soc., Raleigh, N.C.

 

*Mrs. Ray C. Laaker, 2295 Rachael Ave, San Diego, Calif. 92139

 


The possible presence of a second individual named Matthew Sellers may be indicated in deeds recording land transfers some 20 miles southeast of the White Marsh area. On March 8, 1771, a Matthew Sellers purchased 200 acres of land on both sides of Shallotte Swamp from Arthur Robbins, the husband of Mary Penelope Sellers Robbins (A/50). On March 13, 1776, a Matthew Sellers sold this land to William Gause, Jr. (B/87). If this does represent another Matthew Sellers, it probably was not Matthew, the son of Elisha Sellers. Although Elsiha lived in the vicinity of Shallotte Swamp at the time, his son was born about 1760-1770 and thus would have been too young to be the person mentioned in these deeds. It may have been the Matthew whose household in 1790 contained two males under 16 and two females, and who was listed next to Elisha in that census.

 

In the December, 1782, session of the county court Matthew, Benjamin and Simon Sellers were involved in a lawsuit against Robert Bell. Based on these associations, it is probable that this was Matthew, son of Benjamin. On October 17, 1783, Matthew sold 150 acres on “the SW branch of the Waggamaw below the White Marsh” to Reuben Grissett (B/17l).

 

Subsequent records indicate the presence of three persons with the name Matthew Sellers in the county at one time. Avail­able data allow us to distinguish among these individuals to an extent, and to identify the one who was a son of Elisha Sellers and lived his life in the Waccamaw District. The records that appear to pertain to this Matthew are presented separately in the profile on that individual. The other records discussed below may pertain to either one or both of the other two Matthews, one of who was the son of Benjamin.

 

On July 9, 1787, a grant was entered for a Matthew Sellers for 100 acres on Middle Swamp and Gap Branch, adjoining Judah Swain and Russ. This land was granted on November 16, 1790. This grant is described in the deed book as extending “from Russes line south­ward” (H/483). It appears to have been located in eastern Lockwoods Folly or Town Creek.

 

Three individuals named Matthew Sellers are listed as heads of households in the 1790 census. One, located seven entries away from Simon Sellers, was head of a household consisting of 2 males over 16, 1 male under 16, 5 females and 2 slaves. Based on the records of descendants, this appears to be the Matthew who moved to Kentucky. Another, located next to Elisha Sellers, consisted of 1 male over 16, 2 males under 16, and 2 females. The third household, believed on the basis of subsequent census records to be that of the son of Elisha, consisted of 1 male over 16 and 1 female.

 

On January 17, 1792, a Matthew Sellers bought from John, William, and Nathaniel Hill 640 acres on the west side of the Cape Fear River, a plantation known as “York Place” (C/74). The Oct­ober, 1792, session of the county court appointed a Matthew Sellers as a guardian of the minor heirs of Robert Potter and as a patroller
for the district of Ft. Johnson. A Matthew Sellers was appointed to assist in laying off a road from Lockwoods Folly to Smith­ville by the April, 1793, court. On June 26, 1793, Matthew Sellers was granted 640 acres on the southwest bank of the Cape. Fear River, adjoining Luke Swain and Richard Quince and including the “plant­ation where he lives formerly called York Place”. The plat shows this land to be bounded on the upstream side by property belonging to Abram Baker (data from Fran Laaker). This property was located between Moore’s Creek and Orton Creek, on land presently occupied by the Sunny Point Military Terminal.

 

Apparently, there was some uncertainty about the title to York Place, as we see from the above data that Matthew obtained a grant for the property after securing a deed for it from the Hill brothers. An additional grant, for 297 acres adjoining his own and Abram Baker’s land, was issued on December 8, l794.  (N.C. Grant No. 288). One of the chain carriers for this survey, done on June 12, 1794, was listed as "Archabel Cellers”.

 

On January 27, l794, a Matthew Sellers sold 100 acres adjoining Russ on the south side of Middle Swamp (C/346). This was the parcel acquired by grant in 1790.

 

In the January, 1796, session of court, a deed was registered from Abraham Baker and Ann his wife to Matthew Sellers for 640 acres in the western territories. This property was described in a deed of October 26, 1795, as being 640 acres on the Cumberland River in Davidson County, now Tennessee (C/352). This land later became part of Warren County, Tennessee (Fran Laaker). At the same time, Matthew Sellers and Ann his wife conveyed to Abraham Baker 937 acres of land on the Cape Fear River. The deed described part of the land as “where Sellers now lives” (D/2).

 

On October 17, 1796, there was another acquisition of land in Tennessee by a Matthew Sellers, this time for 640 acres in Mont­gomery County obtained through the assignment of a Revolutionary War bounty land warrant from a William Morgan (N.C. Grant No. 2780). The tax list for Montgomery County in 1798 includes a Matthew Sellers with 300 acres of land and a Thomas Sellers with 250 acres. Records of Davidson and Warren Counties, Tennessee, show that the land acquired in the above transactions was occupied by the family of a Matthew Sellers through 1830 (Fran Laaker).

 

Records of Livingston County, Kentucky, show that a Matthew Sellers and wife Ann were resident there as early as 1800. Birth and marriage records of children of this individual show that the family came from Brunswick County, North Carolina, and that the youngest known child was born in Livingston County. Members of the family were married in Livingston County from 1805 to 1809. This Matthew died about 1807, his will being proved in the Jan­uary, 1808, court of Livingston County. A statement written by Matthew Bacon Sellers, the youngest child of this family, records that his mother was Ann Corbett; and that his father was 57 and his mother 49 years old at the time of his birth in 1800. This handwritten statement is preserved by descendants of Matthew Bacon Sellers (information from Mrs. Mary E. Beadles, 4037 Northview Lane, Dallas, Texas 75229). The facts that Matthew and Ann
Corbett Sellers lived in Bladen County in May, 1773, and that a Matthew Sellers of Bladen County sold land in Edgecombe County formerly belonging to his father Benjamin Sellers, on November 29, l774 indicates that the Matthew who moved to Kentucky was the son of Benjamin.

 

Descendants of both of these individuals named Matthew are identified and traced to modern times.

 

The data show that two of the three Matthew Sellers identified in the 1790 census did not appear in the 1800 census for Brunswick County. The third one, who continued to appear in Brunswick County records, is identified with some degree of certainty through court records and land deeds as the son of Elisha Sellers. We know that one Matthew moved to Kentucky and another one to Tenn­essee, between 1795 and 1800. One of the latter two owned a large parcel of land on the Cape Fear River and lived in the vicinity of Brunswick Town in 1792 and 1793. An “Archabel Cellers” was. a chain carrier for a survey done for this person in l794. As the Matthew who moved to Tennessee had a son or close relative named Archibald, it appears probable that he was the owner of the Cape Fear property.

 

If the Matthew who lived in Livingston County, Kentucky, was Matthew, son of Benjamin, he would have been about 60 to 66 years old at his death in 1807. According to a statement written by his son, this Matthew was 64 when he died. If the Matthew who moved to Tennessee was the son of Benjamin, he lived to a much greater age, being at least 90 years old in the 1830’s.

 

On the basis of the evidence presented above, it appears that Matthew, son of Benjamin, departed Brunswick County around the end of the 18th Century and was resident in Kentucky by 1800. For the purposes of this compilation, the two Matthews who moved to Tennessee and Kentucky, respectively, are identified as Matthew (T) and Matthew (K). Children of these two individuals, as identified by descendants, were:

 

Matthew Sellers (K) and wife Ann Corbett Sellers --

children identified in a will filed in Livingston County,

Kentucky:

John Sellers -- m. Elizabeth Kirkwood Oct. 1, 1807

Salome Sellers -- m. Thomas Travis Aug. 15, 1805

Mary Sellers -- m. Joseph Hughes Jan. 10, 1809

Ann Sellers -- m. Robert Galloway

Rhoda Sellers -- m. Elisha Minner June 8, 1809

Samuel Sellers -- was Methodist minister

Matthew Bacon Sellers -- b. ca. 1800, Kentucky

  m. (1) Elizabeth Cash; (2) Angelina Leathers Lewis

 

(Data from Mary E. Beadles)


Matthew Sellers (T) -- children identified by indirect evidence from deeds and court records of Warren and Montgomery Counties, Tennessee:

John Sellers -- b. ca. 1776

Archibald Sellers -- b. ca. 1778 (may be other

  close relative)

Drury Sellers -- b. ca. 1781

Matthew Sellers, Jr. -- b. ca. 1783

 

(Data from Fran Laaker).


Records Pertaining to Benjamin Sellers, Son of Benjamin

 

 

Benjamin Sellers was evidently of age in 1761, the time of his father’s will. Thus, we may conclude that he was born prior to l740. In Edgecombe County, he co-witnessed a deed dated September 16, 1758, with his father, Benjamin (00/19). This suggests that he was of age or nearly so at the time.

 

Benjamin was included in the 1769 tax list for Brunswick County, and he was a witness to a deed filed by his brother Matthew for the purchase of land on Shallotte Swamp on March 28, 1771 (A/150). His name does not appear on the 1772 or 1784 tax lists, however, which suggests that he was not a resident of the county during that period.

 

Presently, no record is known of his acquiring land on the White Marsh, a major tributary on the west side of the Waccamaw River in what is now Columbus County; however, in 1773 he sold land in that area to his brother Matthew (B/8). On January 4, 1778, Benjamin and Matthew witnessed the sale of 100 acres on the west side of the White Marsh by James Sellers to John McClinnon, probably a son-in-law of Elisha Sellers (B/105). On March 16, 1779, Benjamin was a chain carrier for a survey done for Simon Sellers, on the east side of Beaverdam Swamp, a few miles southwest of the White Marsh (N.C. Grant No. 204).

 

Benjamin was a resident of All Saints Parish, in Georgetown District, S.C., in 1790. The census of that year showed that his household consisted of 1 male over 16, 3 males of 16 or less and 3 females. According to W. W. Sellers* Benjamin Sellers, his great-grandfather, lived in the Green Sea section of Horry County and helped to build the first church there. Benjamin was granted a 640-acre tract on Huggins Creek branch of Mitchell Swamp on July 2, 1792 (A/139). Benjamin was a Methodist minister, being ordained by Bishop Richard Whatcoat, a travelling companion of Bishop Asbury, in 1801 (Asbury, Francis **).

 

In the 1800 census of Waccamaw County (now Horry), S.C., Benjamin was shown as head of a household consisting of 1 male over 45, 1 male 0-10, 2 males 16-26, 1 female 26-45, 1 female 10-16, and 1 female 16-26. On August 25, 1802, Benjamin was granted 1000 acres more on Huggins Creek (A/322).

 

 

*Sellers, W. W., 1902, History of Marion County, S.C.: Columbia, S.C., H. L. Bryan Publishing Co.

 

**Asbury, Francis, The Journals and Letters of: Clark, Elmer T., et al., eds., 1958:. London, Epworth. Press.


Another Benjamin Sellers appeared in the records of Brunswick County in 1803, and was present through 1835. The family associations of this individual are not known, although his close association with sons of Elisha, as demonstrated through prop­erty holdings, suggests that he may have been another son of Elisha and hence a nephew of Benjamin of Horry County. Records pertaining to this person are treated separately, in the profile of Benjamin Sellers of Waccamaw and Shallotte.

 

In the 1810 census of Horry County, Benjamin was shown as head of a household consisting of 1 male over 45, 2 females over 45, and 1 female 16-26. Benjamin was still a resident of Horry County on December 28, 1815, when he purchased 150 acres in Brunswick County on Beaverdam Creek (G/253). This deed was proved in the Brunswick County court of January 29, 1816.

 

By March 19, 1817, Benjamin was a resident of Brunswick County, as on that date he deeded his 150-acre plantation “where I now live” to his grandson William Rothwell (G/324). This may be a reference to the 150 acres he bought on Beaverdam Creek in 1815. The name Blenning Creek does not appear on modern maps. It did appear on the Mouzon map of 1775*, as a small tributary on the south side of the Cape Fear River, some 3 miles upstream from the confluence of the Black River. On the 1954 topographic map of the Acme, N.C., quadrangle, a “Blenon Landing” is shown a short distance downstream from the mouth of Beaverdam Creek. A small stream in that vicinity is shown as “Double Branch”. From these data, it appears that Benjamin’s 150 acres may have been located between Beaverdam Creek and the present-day Double Branch.

 

On January 1, 1817, Benjamin proved the will of his brother Simon in the Brunswick County court. On March 25, 1817, Benjamin’s will was filed. In it, Benjamin named Letitia, his wife; sons Jordan and Write; daughter Rhoday Folk; and grandsons Jacob Marion Sellers and William Rothwell. The will was recorded at the Oct­ober, 1817, session of the court, and Letitia Sellers was quali­fied as the executrix.

 

In the 1820 census of Brunswick County, Letecia Sellers was listed as the head of a household consisting of 2 females over 45 and 1 male 18-26.

 

According to W.W. Sellers, Benjamin was married twice: first, to a Miss Bryant, by whom he had 5 children, only one of which, Jordan, lived to maturity; and second, to a wife whose name was not stated, but by whom he had sons named Wright, Luke and Levin and a daughter named Rhoda. Evidence for the first marriage is provided by the will of Christian Bryant, widow, of St. Pauls Parish in Charleston District, S.C., which was dated October 4,

 

 

 

*    Cumming, W.P., 1966, North Carolina in Maps: Raleigh, State Department of Archives and History (Plate VIII).
1789 and proved January 12, 1790; and which named grandchildren

Jordan Sellers and Sarah Sellers. It is possible that this family

was also the source of the name of Elisha’s youngest son, John

Bryant Sellers. Perhaps this lady was the widow of John Bryant.

 

Information compiled by Col. Charles Schweizer* shows Benjamin had a daughter named Mary, who married Jonathan Rothwell. Census data suggest that this daughter must have been by the first mar­riage. Perhaps Mary was identical to the Sarah of Christian Bryant’s will,

 

On the basis of the above information and Horry County census data, Benjamin’s children and grandchildren are believed to have included:

 

By first wife       Bryant:

1. Jordan b. Feb. 16, 1763; d. Sept. 9, 1833 Marion Co., S.C.; m. (1) Elizabeth Hanchey, b. 1765-74; m. (2)

    in 1817 Mary Osborne b. ca. 1797, d. 185-.

1.  Female b. 1784-90

2.  Male b. 1784-90

3.  Mary b. l804-10 m. 1819 James Edwards; moved to Ala.

4.William W. b. ca. 1818, d. 19--; m. Martha       ,

      b. ca. 1821

5.  Susan b. ca. 1830

6.  Civil b. ca. 1833

2.         Sarah (from Christian Bryant will; may be identical

to Mary, below)

       3.  Mary b.     m. Jonathan Rothwell

4.  Died young

5.  Died young

By second wife Letitia       b. 1755-74, d. after 1820

6.  Wright b. ca. 1774, d. after 1836; m.       , b. 1780-90

7.  Luke b. 1774-90, d. ca. 1803; m. Rebecca        

8. Levin b. 1774-90, d. 1809

9.         Rhoda b. Nov. 11, 1784, d. Nov. 8, 1847, Louisville,

Ala.; m. James Faulk

 

A male born 1790-1800 was listed in Benjamin’s household in 1800 and 1810, and with Benjamin’s widow in 1820. This may have been another child but the birth dates suggest that he was a grandchild.

 

According to a pension application that he filed in 1834, Jordan Sellers served in the Revolution, enlisting at the age of 18 in the North Carolina Continental troops. He was stationed near Georgetown and at various other places in South Carolina on guard duty, serving to the end of the war (Revolutionary Pension Applications, National Archives). Jordan was listed as head of a household in Brunswick County in 1790, and was appointed to jury

 

*Col. Charles b. Schweizer, 2 Lakewood Drive, Edwardsville, Illinois 62025
duty by the April, 1795, court of that county. In the 1800, 1810, and 1820 censuses, he was listed in Horry County. By the time of the 1830 census, he was resident in Marion County, S.C. At the time of his pension application, September 15, 1834, he was a resident of Robeson County, N.C.

 

According to information compiled by Col. Schweizer, Mary Sellers, Benjamin’s daughter, married Jonathan Rothwell of Bruns­wick County. Their children included William J. Rothwell, A.B. Rothwell, Jonathan H. Rothwell, and Lydia Rothwell, who married Morgan C. Turrentine. Another daughter, name unknown, appears to have married Duncan King.

 

Wright Sellers witnessed an Horry County deed of Benjamin’s on November 17, 1807 (A/322). Wright was listed as the head of a household in the 1810 and 1820 censuses of Horry County. The ages given for members of his household are inconsistent between these records and it appears that individuals not his children may have live with him. It appears that Wright had at least 3 and possibly 6 daughters, and at least 1 and possibly 2 sons. Records of desc­endants show that Wright married a Duncan. He and his family moved from their home near Iron Springs Swamp in Horry County to Pike County, Alabama, where he was present for the 1830 census. Barbour County was cut from Pike County in 1832, and subsequent records of that county show that Wright patented land there in 1836. A son of Wright, Benjamin Duncan Sellers, married Elizabeth Cromartie and, according to family records, moved to Alabama about 1826. A B.D. Sellers was listed as head of a family in Pike County in the 1830 census, on the same page as Wright Sellers.

 

Luke Sellers, Benjamin’s son, died in 1803. His estate was probated in Horry County on August 25 of that year. Benjamin was the administrator of the estate, and the papers were signed by Benjamin, Jordan, and Wright Sellers, Elizabeth Graham, and Ezekiel Duncan. Luke’s wife was named as Rebecca Sellers.

 

Levin Sellers was a minister of the Cypress Circuit of the South Carolina Conference of the Methodist Church, according to information compiled by Col. Schweizer. Minutes of the annual conference of 1807, now in records of the S.C. Conference Archives (at Wofford College, Spartanburg, S.C.) report that Leven Sellers was admitted on trial. The same records report that Leven Sellers died on August 26, 1809. The location of the Cypress Circuit is not known. However, the records state that it was in the Saluda District, which was south and west of, but near, Columbia, S.C.

 

The family of Rhoda Sellers and James Faulk has been treated in detail by Col. Schweizer in his book Descendants of James and Rhoda (Sellers) Faulk (the third volume of his work on the Faulk family), which enumerates descendants to the present date. James and Rhoda Faulk moved to Pike County, Alabama, by 1830, when they were enumerated on the same page of the census listing as Wright Sellers and B. D. Sellers.


Jacob Marion Sellers, named as a grandson in Benjamin’s will, was probably the Jacob M. Sellers who was head of a household and 20-30 years old in 1830. It is possible that this also was the male, 18-26, listed in Wright’s household of 1820. His age is consistent with that of the 0-10 year old male in Wright’s household of 1810; therefore, it is possible that Wright was Jacob Marion’s father. It is also possible, however, that Jacob Marion was the 18-26 year old male listed in Letecia’s household of 1820 and, prior to that, in Benjamin’s household of 1800 and 1810. Further, a family story among descendants of Benjamin in Alabama says that Luke Sellers had a son named Jacob. This information does not tell us who Jacob Marion’s father was; and it leaves unaccounted one of the two males, born 1794-1802, described above.

 

On October 1, 1827, a marriage bond was filed in Duplin County for a Jacob Sellers and Mary Bryant. This may have been Jacob Marion Sellers; however, the name Jacob was in use among the Sellers families of the Sampson County area at the time (relation to the Brunswick County Sellers, if any, unknown at present) and it is possible that this was another individual. Jacob M. Sellers and wife, with no children, appeared in the 1840 census record for Pike County, Alabama. No further information is presently available on this couple.


Records Pertaining to Joel Sellers, Son of Benjamin

 

 

Joel Sellers was more than 14 but less than 21 years of age in 1762, when Edgecombe County records show that he chose his mother as his guardian; therefore, he was born between 1740 and 1748. Edgecombe County records show that he was bound out to Kindred Carter in 1764, indicating that he was still not of age at that time and that he was born after 1742.

 

Joel’s name appears on the Brunswick County tax lists for 1769 and 1772. On January 19, 1772, he purchased 400 acres of land on the White Marsh from his brother Matthew (A/149). On December 21, 1779, a grant for 100 acres on the south side of the Seven Creeks was entered for Joel Sellers. William Sellers and Ezekiel Bryant were chain carriers for the survey. Four days earlier, Joel had witnessed a deed of sale of 400 acres on the White Marsh from Matthew Sellers to Jethro Robbins (A/15l).

 

A family tradition says that Joel may have gone to Charleston, S.C. Nothing is known definitely of a marriage or children. However, Brunswick County deed records show that Sion Sellers (ca. 1774-84 -- 185-) of South Carolina sold 100 acres on Seven Creeks on October 13, 1800 (D/247). This may have been the land granted to Joel in 1779, and Sion may have been an heir of Joel. Sion evidently was raised by Benjamin Sellers (see profile on Ben­jamin), which suggests that, if he was a son of Joel, Joel died when Sion was very young.

 

The name Joel Sellers also appeared in records of Columbus County, beginning in 1819, when an individual of that name was listed among the jury for the November court. Census records of 1820-1850 also list a Joel Sellers in Columbus County. This person is believed to have been one of the children of Amelia Sellers.

 

Present evidence in the form of property deeds and similar given names suggests the possibility that Amelia Sellers may have been the widow of Joel Sellers. This evidence is discussed in the profile on Amelia and her family.


Records Pertaining to Jechonias Sellers, Son of Benjamin

 

 

Jechonias Sellers was more than 14 in 1761 but was not of legal age; therefore, he was born between 1747 and 1761. He was listed as a taxpayer in Brunswick County in 1769, adjacent to his brother Matthew. However, there are no records showing that he acquired land.

 

It appears that Jechonias returned to Edgecombe County sometime before 1781, as there is a Jechonias Sellers, single, on the list of insolvents in Capt. Horn’s district for that year (Edgecombe County Court Minutes, Feb. 27, 1783). He had returned to Brunswick County by September 17, 1784, when he appeared as a witness to a land sale by Arthur Robbins (B/328). He did not appear on the 1790 census as the head of a household.

 

Nothing more of Jechonias is recorded until his death in Brunswick County in late 1813. A non-cupative will was brought into court on April 25, 1814, by Arthur Robbins, Jr., who swore that “Jeconias Sellers” had stated on October 25, 1813, that he, Arthur Robbins, Jr., was to have what cattle Jechonias had after his death; and that Penelope Robbins (Jechonias’ sister) was to have his money and to collect any debts owed him; and that Daniel Robbins was to have his rifle gun. The deposition was made on November 11, 1813. Thus, it seems that Jechonias had died by that time. It also appears that he had been living with his sister and brother-in-law. The 1810 census shows 2 males over 45 years of age in the household of Arthur Robbins, Sr., one of who probably was Jechonias Sellers.


Records Pertaining to Penelope Sellers, Daughter of Benjamin

 

 

Mary Penelope Sellers, named in Benjamin Sellers’ will of 1761 as Mary Sellers, was less than 14 years old at the time of her father’s death; therefore, she was born sometime after 1748. A marriage bond for Mary Penelope Sellers and Arthur Robbins was filed in Edgecombe County on April 14, 1764, which suggests that she was at least 15 years old by that time. Later census data for Arthur Robbins’ wife show only that she was born before 1755.

 

The earliest record of Arthur Robbins’ presence in Brunswick

County is a grant for 200 acres on both sides of “Shallot Swamp”,

including his improvements, for which the survey was done on

February 20, 1769. The grant was issued on December 16, 1769.

Arthur Robbins was included in the 1769 tax list for Brunswick

County.

 

On September 9, 1770, Arthur Robbins entered a grant appli­cation for 100 acres of land on the west side of the White Marsh. No issue date is recorded for this grant. He sold the 200 acre grant on Shallotte Swamp to Matthew Sellers, his brother-in-law, on March 28, 1771 (A/50). On September 17, 1784, Arthur sold his tract of 100 acres on the west side of the White Marsh to Dennis Fowler, of Sampson County (B/328). The deed was witnessed by Arthur’s brothers-in-law Jechonias and Matthew Sellers.

 

By the time of the 1790 census, Arthur Robbins’ household consisted of 3 males over 16, 2 males under 16, and 3 females. By October, 1792, be was a resident of the Town Creek District, as the court minutes of that session record his assignment to open a road between Town Creek and Brunswick Town. He witnessed a sale of land on Middle Swamp on January 27, 1794. On April 5, 1798, he received a grant for 50 acres on the west side of the main prong of Mill Creek, between Horse and Horse Pen Branches, at the mouths.

 

In the 1800 census record, Arthur and his wife are shown as more than 45 years old, with 1 male age 16-26, 1 male 10-16, 1 female 10-16 and 1 female 16-26. A younger Arthur Robbins, 26-45, is listed adjacently as head of a family.

 

On April 9, 1808, Arthur Robbins sold to Absalom Robbins a 320-acre tract on Mill Creek, including the plantation where Absalom then lived. The history of ownership described in the deed ident­ifies this tract as being previously owned by Simon Sellers and subsequently sold; then later being bought by Arthur Robbins (E/407). No record is presently available of the date of Arthur’s purchase. Presumably, it would have been about the time he disposed of the last of his land in the western part of the county (September, 1784).

 

On January 15, 1812, Arthur Robbins bought 100 acres on the south side of the first branch of Mill Creek from James Sellers, adjoining Edward Sullivan’s upper line (G/69). He sold this parcel to Drewry Harris on January 20, 1819 (H/335). This was followed five days later by a sale to the same party of 50 acres on Harris
Swamp, adjoining Robbins’ own land (H/334).

 

Arthur Robbins, Sr., is listed in the records of the Mill Creek Baptist Church as being “dead, September 1819”.

 

Numerous other records pertain to Arthur Robbins, Jr., and other probable children of Penelope and Arthur Robbins. These individuals and their descendants have not been researched as part of this project.


Records Pertaining to Simon Sellers, Son of Benjamin Sellers

 

 

Simon Sellers was the youngest of Benjamin’s sons and less than 14 years old at the time the court appointed his mother as his guardian in 1762; therefore, he was born in 1748 or later. By 1769, he was listed as freeholder on the Brunswick County tax list and thus, by inference, must have been born by 1748. It appears that 1748 was the year of Simon’s birth.

 

Simon’s “improvement” on land on the southwest side of the ‘White Marsh was mentioned in a grant to his brother Matthew, dated Sept. 4, 1770, indicating that he was a resident of that area then. Simon was a witness to a purchase of land by his brother Matthew on Shallotte Swamp in March, 1771 (A/150). He witnessed a sale by Matthew to Joel Sellers of 400 acres on the White Marsh in January, 1772 (A/l49), and another sale by Matthew to Jethro Robbins of 400 acres in the same area and same month (A/151). He was entered on the tax list for 1772 and on July 1, 1773, received a grant for 100 acres of land on Grissett Swamp, a tributary to the Seven Creeks (N.C. Grant No. 269). On July 2, 1773, a survey for 100 acres on the south side of the Beaver Dams, “including the place where John Johnston now lives”, was performed for a grant entry for Simon.

 

On September 19, 1778, Simon bought 150 acres of land on the west side of the White Marsh from James Corbett, Matthew’s father-in-law (B/100). This land had been sold earlier to Corbett by Matthew (B/l7). On March 16, 1779, Simon filed a survey for 100 acres on the east side of Beaverdam Swamp, which drains into the Waccamaw River some 10 miles north of the Seven Creeks (N.C. Grant No. 204). Simon sold this land to John Flin on August 1, 1782 (B/337).

 

In 1783, Simon moved eastward to the vicinity of the Cape Fear River. On August 1 of that year, he received a grant for 100 acres on the northwest side of Orton Mill Creek, on a fork (N.C. Grant No. 346). On the same day, his brother Elisha was granted 100 acres on the northwest branch of Roger Moores Creek. In April, 1785, however, Elisha endorsed his land over to Simon (same grant file as above). In September of the same year, Simon bought 640 acres more on Mill Creek Branch of Town Creek from Thomas Russ (B/26l), and on October 29 had an additional 100 acres on the north side of Orton Mill Creek surveyed. A grant for the latter was awarded on July 11, 1788 (C/37).

 

In December, 1785, Simon was appointed as a patroller in the neighborhood of Brunswick by the county court. On August 2, 1787, Simon bought a house and lot in Brunswick Town, the confiscated property of James White, a Loyalist (B/322). In 1788, he purchased 320 acres on the east side of the Cape Fear, on Federal Point in New Hanover County (K/322), and in June of the following year he sold 320 acres of the 640 he had acquired on Mill Creek, to Levy Sparkman (C/30). In March, 1789, he purchased a second lot in


Brunswick Town (B/412). The 1790 census of Brunswick County showed Simon’s household as consisting of 1 male over 16, 1 male less than 16, and 2 females. As late as December, 1792, Simon served on juries in Brunswick County, but by February, 1793, he was carried on a list of jurors in New Hanover County. Thus, it appears that he changed his residence to the east side of the Cape Fear River early in 1793.

 

In October, 1798, and April, 1799, the Wilmington Gazette carried Simon’s name in the “unclaimed mail” column. In the 1800 census, Simon was listed as a resident of New Hanover County, in a household with 1 male and 1 female, each age 26-45. Simon was granted land on Motte’s Creek in New Hanover County on November 23, 1804. The 1810 census for New Hanover County has been lost. On January 9, 1815, Simon Sellers of New Hanover County bought 500 acres on the Cape Fear River north of the first branch above Snows Point, from Elizabeth Cains and William Gilbert (M/2l9). In the 1815 tax list for Brunswick County, Simon is listed as an owner of property in the Northwest District, on the Cape Fear River. He was not listed for the Town Creek District and so evidently had disposed of the 320 acres on Mill Creek that he had retained there in 1788.

 

Simon’s will was filed on December 26, 1816, in Brunswick County. In it, he named his wife, Winnie, children Simon Sellers and Effie Grissom, and son-in-law James Grissom. The will was proved in the Brunswick County court of January 1, 1817, by the oath of Benjamin Sellers. John C. Baker was named as the executor of the will.

 

Simon Sellers married Winney Baker on April 26, 1814, in Bruns­wick County, with Henry Mintz as witness. Winney Baker possibly was related to Abram Baker, who also owned a large parcel of land on the Brunswick County side of the Cape Fear. Winney’s name appeared in the Brunswick County court record of July 31, 1809, when she, Mary Baker, Elias Smith and Ann Smith ceded property to Isaac Baker - probably an inheritance settlement. Simon Sellers, Jr., was bequeathed 3 slaves from his father’s estate, receiving them on Decem­ber 1, 1818 (H/224).

 

No definite information is available on the identity of Simon’s first wife, who was 26-45 years old in the 1800 census. However, it appears probable that her first name may have been Susan. A notice in the April 4, 1799, issue of the Wilmington Gazette stated that a letter for Mrs. Susan Sellers awaited her in the post office. The only other Sellers listed in the New Hanover census for 1800 was a John Sellers, whose 1816 estate settlement seems to identify his wife as Mary; therefore, “Mrs. Susan Sellers” may have been Simon’s wife. This thesis is reinforced somewhat by the fact that Simon’s son, Simon Sellers, Jr., named a daughter Susan, as is demonstrated in a New Hanover County estate record of December 1, 1819.

 

The descendants of Simon Sellers have been thoroughly researched by Mrs. A. L. Oliver, of 12100 Bushy Drive, Wheaton, Maryland 20902.


Records Pertaining to Elisha Sellers, Son of Benjamin Sellers

 

 

According to his father’s will and to county court records in Edgecombe County, Elisha Sellers was of age in 1761 and there­fore appears to have been born some time before 1740. Thus, he was probably around 25 years old when he was first recorded in Brunswick (then New Hanover) County.

 

On December 12, 1763, Elisha was granted 200 acres on the southwest side of the Waccamaw, at a place called “the Long Bluff”. The grant was entered on March 22, 1763. A parcel of 200 acres of land located on both sides of Starboard Swamp, a branch of the Shallotte River, was granted to Elisha by the Crown on December 16, 1769. Elisha’s brother Matthew was one of the chain carriers for the survey. Starboard Swamp appears, on the basis of property plats, to have been the modern Shallotte Creek, which joins the Shallotte River from the east on the north side of Boone Neck. Elisha apparently lived on or in the vicinity of this property for the rest of his life. An additional grant in the sane area, 100 acres on the east side of “Starborn Swamp”, was made to Elisha by the State of North Carolina on December 20, 1798 (A/66). This land was described as being next to the property of Sam Sellers, probably Elisha’s son.

 

Elisha served in the militia from the Wilmington District during the Revolution, according to a pay voucher on file in the North Carolina Archives.

 

On August 1, 1783, Elisha received a grant for 100 acres on the northwest bank of Roger Moore’s Creek “adjacent to John Henderson’s”. This parcel was at the east end of the county, in the general vicinity of Brunswick Town. Evidently, Elisha preferred the Starboard Swamp area, as he endorsed the Moore’s Creek property over to his brother Simon on April 26, 1785 (N.C. Grant No. 346). On June 10, 1788, Elisha signed a deed of gift to James, Nathan, and Daniel Ellis, for 200 acres on the west side of the Waccamaw, which land was laid out to Elisha in 1763 (B/333). On December 12, 1800, Elisha sold to Henry Mints, his son-in-law, 100 acres adjoin­ing Elisha’s land on Starboard Swamp (D/252).

 

Elisha Sellers’ will was filed in Brunswick County on November 16, 1801. In it, Elisha named his wife Mary and children John Bryant Sellers, Sarah McClelland, Mary Singletary, William Sellers, Thomas Sellers, Matthew Sellers, Willets Sellers, and Ann Peoples Mintz. He also named his grandchildren Elisha Sellers and William Sellers. The will was proved in the April, 1813, session of the county court, and in that record Mary, Thomas, Matthew, Willets and Samuel Sellers, Henry Mintz and Martha Perkins were listed as legatees. On April 10, 1813, the above legatees sold their rights to the land on Starboard Swamp to a Benjamin Sellers. The deed of sale refers to Elisha’s will, in which the land was devised to John B. Sellers, Elisha’s youngest son, and to the fact that John B. Sellers had died a minor (H/459).


Evidently, John Bryant Sellers was a favorite of his father

Elisha, for we see that a State land grant grant was entered in

John’s name on August 8, 1800, for 100 acres on Starboard Swamp

(N.C. Grant No. 859).

 

In the 1790 census, Elisha’s household contained 3 males of 16 or younger and 1 female. Elisha’s daughters Sarah, Mary and Ann, married at the time of his 1801 will, must have already left home by 1790. In the 1800 census, a female, 0-10 years old, is listed in Elisha’s household. Perhaps this is the Martha Perkins of the 1813 estate settlement. If she was a daughter, she was not included in the 1801 will.

 

No documentary records of Elisha’s marriage are known to exist. However, traditional records state that he was married three times. First, he is supposed to have married Sarah ----, about 1765 (D.A.R. Lineage No. 489552). No record is known of the second wife, but Elisha’s third wife is believed to have been Mary Willets, of Brunswick County. The three Ellis males, to whom Elisha made a deed of gift in 1788, may have been stepchildren from one of the two earlier marriages.


Records Pertaining to Matthew Sellers, Son of Elisha

 

 

According to available census data, Matthew Sellers, son of Elisha Sellers, was born between 1760 and 1770. He was shown in the 1790 census as the head of a household, with 1 female more than 16 years of age.

 

Matthew evidently was raising cattle by April 11, 1796, when the court recorded his earmark. This mark was very similar to that of his brother Thomas, with a slight variation. On July 11, 1796, the county court placed Matthew on a list of residents of the district near the Waccamaw, appointed to clear the river between New Britton and the State Line. On January 9, 1797, Matthew bought 50 acres on the northeast side of the Waccamaw from Benjamin Simmins (D/78), selling it to William Simmons 6 years later (E/25). In the 1800 census, he was listed as 26 to 45 years old and the head of a household consisting of 1 male 0-10, 2 females 0-10, and 1 female 26-45 years old. On November 5, 1801, Matthew Sellers bought 400 acres on Wet Ash Swamp from Benjamin Taylor (E/17). On December 20, 1803, he received a grant for 60 acres of land on the north side of Willis Swamp (A/249).

 

In January, 1805, Matthew served on the county jury, and in July of the same year he was appointed to work on the road from Robesons to John Wards ferry on the Waccamaw. Apparently, Matthew had qualities of leadership, for we see that he was made overseer of the New Britton road in the November, 1807, session of the court. He continued to serve on jury duty and in January of 1810 was appointed to superior court duty.

 

The 1810 census showed Matthew as over 45 years old, with 1 male 0-10, 1 male 16-26, 2 females 0-10, 2 females 10-16, and 1 female 26-45 in his household. In January, 1811, Matthew was appointed a Justice of the Peace by the county court, representing the Waccamaw District. On October 20, 1811, a marriage bond was posted for a Matthew Sellers and Mary Boazman; this was probably Matthew, Jr., of later records. The latter individual served as a private in Capt. Grissett’s Company of the Brunswick Regiment of N.C. Militia in late July, 1813, in response to a call to arms against possible attack by the British along the coast (War of 1812 Service Records, National Archives).

 

On April 10, 1813, Matthew conveyed his share of Elisha’s Starboard Swamp land to Benjamin Sellers of Lockwoods Folly and Shallotte, whose relationships in the Sellers family have not yet been identified. In January, 1814, Matthew was the judge of the county court, and by July of that year was referred to as Matthew Sellers, Esquire, the Justice for Waccamaw. He was appointed Tax Collector for the Waccamaw District in April, 1815.


Matthew Sellers, Jr., bought 100 acres on the east side of Wet Ash in October, 1815 (J/125), and was probably the person of that name represented on the 1815 tax list as owning property in that area. On November 10, 1815, Matthew Sellers, Jr., sold 150 acres on Bear Branch to John Ward, Jr. (G/208).

 

On July 29, 1817, Matthew acted as attorney for his sister Sarah and her husband John McClelland in their sale of 100 acres of land on the west side of Starboard Swamp, originally granted to John Bryant Sellers, to Benjamin Sellers (H/37).

 

In the January, 1820 court a deed of sale from Matthew Sellers to Ethelred Boazman was proved, for 160 acres on Wet Ash swamp (H/230 and H/329). Matthew is not listed in the 1820 census record; however, be was present in the county at the time, for he served as Overseer of Polls for the Waccamaw District in August. His name appears on jury lists through July, 1824. Matthew Sellers, Sr., and Matthew Sellers, Jr., were both on the jury for the October, 1821, session. According to census data, this may be Matthew, Sr.’s son. On July 15, 1824, Matthew Seller’s sold 100 acres on Wolf Pen Branch of Wet Ash Swamp to Ethelred Boazman (I/271).

 

In 1830, Matthew’s age was given as 60-70; his household included 3 males 5-10, 1 male 10-15, 2 males 15-20, 1 male 20-30, 1 feamle 0-5, 2 females 15-20, and 1 female 30-40. Matthew Sellers, Jr., 30-40 years old, was listed separately and not on the same page as Matthew, Sr.; however, his age is right to have been the 16-26 year old male of the 1810 census record. This is probably the Matthew Sellers who served 10 days as a private in Capt. A.C.W. Grissetts Company of the Brunswick Regiment of the N.C. Militia, which was mustered during the last week of July in 1813 (War of 1812 Service Records, National Archives).

 

On January 17, 1830, Matthew Sellers sold 150 acres on “Sippio” Swamp to Archibald Stephens (K/316), and on February 10, 1831, received a grant for additional land in the same area (K/211).

 

Matthew, Sr., moved to Pike County, Alabama between 1831 and 1840, and lived near the family of his brother Samuel Sellers. The 1840 census shows Matthew as 70-80 years old, with 2 females, 10-15 and 50-60, in his household. He is listed adjacent to Benjamin Sellers, 20-30, and John Sellers, 30-40, and their families; these two men were the right ages to have been his sons as listed in 1830.

 

Matthew was not listed in Pike County in 1850, and presumably died between 1840 and then. Matthew, Jr., was not listed in either 1840 or 1850 in Brunswick County.

 

Matthew’s children probably included:

Matthew, Jr., born 1784-1794, m. Mary Boazman Oct. 20, 1811 Sarah, born 1800-1810 m. 1834 William T. Oates*

 

Female, born 1800-1810

John, born 1800-1810 m. Nancy Boazman Feb. 23, 1815

Benjamin, born 1810-1820

 

*   From John P. Johnston, 253 Nassau Street, Brundidge, Alabama; Sarah and William Oates’ son became Governor of Alabama.


Records Pertaining to Samuel Sellers, Son of Elisha

 

 

Samuel, son of Elisha Sellers, was born in Brunswick County in 1788, according to an account of the Sellers family in Pike County, Alabama, written by Mrs. C. H. Watters.* Although Samuel was not named in Elisha’s will of November 16, 1801, Elisha provided a property division for his children by his wife Mary; and when the will was proved in 1813, Samuel was named as an heir.

 

Brunswick County marriage records show that Samuel married Sarah Stanaland there on December 19, 1806. In the October, 1808, session of the county court, he was appointed constable of the Waccamaw District.

 

On June 1, 1810, Samuel bought 100 acres of land on the east side of Caw Caw Swamp from Christopher Bassford (F/116). Samuel may have already been a landowner, for we see in the description of a grant made to Elisha Sellers on December 20, 1790, for 100 acres on the east side of Starboard Swamp, that Sam Sellers’ land adjoined the grant. Elisha therefore may have obtained a grant for Samuel while he was still a child, as he did for two other minor sons, John Bryant Sellers and Willets Sellers.

 

On July 30, 1810, Samuel’s term as constable expired and he was replaced in that office by a Benjamin Sellers. Samuel does not appear as the head of a household in the surviving 1810 census record. In the February, 1812, session of the court, Samuel was designated among others to work on the old post road leading from Shallotte Bridge to the South Carolina line, which was “again to be considered a publick road”. Benjamin Sellers was the overseer of this section of road.

 

On April 10, 1813, Samuel sold his rights in the Starboard Swamp land he and his co-heirs had inherited from Elisha (H/459), and on April 26 of the same year was chosen to serve on the next county jury. The Brunswick County tax record for 1815 listed Samuel Sellers in the Waccamaw District, “near Cau Cau Swamp”.

 

The name Samuel Sellers appears in jury lists over the period 1815 to 1833. However, because there were two adults named Samuel Sellers in Brunswick County from about l8l4 to about 1824, and three from about 1824 to about 1834, it is not known which or how many of the three are represented in these lists.

 

Samuel Sellers bought 50 additional acres of land on the east side of Caw Caw Swamp on September 17, 1818, from Samuel Clewis. Mary Sellers, possibly Samuel’s mother, was a witness (H/193). Samuel did not appear as the head of a household in the 1820 census. In the June, 1829, session of the county court, Samuel was appointed overseer of polls for the Waccamaw District.

 

On February 26, 1830, a Samuel Sellers bought a 17 year-old negro girl named Lunah from John H. White (K/156). In the 1830 census, which enumerated three heads of households named Samuel Sellers in the county, Samuel, son of Elisha, was listed on the
same page as his cousins Willis D. Sellers and Matthew Sellers, Jr., as head of a household consisting of 1 male 5-10, 2 males 10-15, 3 males 15-20, 2 males 20-30, 1 male 40-50, 3 females 5-10, 2 females 10-15, 1 female 20-30, and 1 female 40-50.

 

On December 10, 1830, Samuel Sellers, Sr., was granted 100 acres on “Bryan Settlee Crow Swamp”, joining his own, Willis D. Sellers’, and Samuel Frink’s land (K/231), and 100 acres on Big Crow Swamp near Cow Branch and Oakey Branch, joining his own land (K/232).

 

On March 5, 1831, Samuel bought 90 acres of land on the northwest side of Caw Caw Swamp, on the mouth of Cow Branch, from Elisha Sellers. The deed was witnessed by Elisha H. Sellers (Samuel’s son) and Robert Swain (K/155). The vendor of this property is called Elisha III in this compilation. Possibly, he was a son of Thomas Sellers and hence Samuel’s nephew.

 

On August 1, 1834, Samuel Sellers sold 130 acres on both sides of Big Crow Swamp to William Gause, witnessed by Samuel’s son, Hosea Sellers (L/393). This deed was proved in the December, 1836, session of the court by the oath of Daughtry Gause. By that time, Samuel and his family had emigrated to Alabama.

 

According to Mrs. Watters’ account, Samuel and Sarah Sellers and their 15 children moved to Pike County, Alabama, arriving in the vicinity of present-day Troy by January, 1835. Census records of 1840 and later decades show this family’s presence in that area, as well as descendants of other Sellers lines from Brunswick County.

 

 

The above-referenced data show that Samuel and Sarah Stanaland Sellers had the following children:

 

1.  Elisha Hugh b. Aug. 4, 1807; m. Harriett      b. ca. 1816

2.  Samuel J. b. Feb. 9, 1809; d. April 21, 1887, Dora, Ala.

3.  Sarah Margaret b. Nov. 2, 1810, d. before Dec. 16,

1854; m. William Thomas

4.  Calvin b. May 5, 1812

5.  Luther b. Sept. 29, 1813; m. Margaret Crousewell

6.  Cornelius b. Feb. 17, 1815

7.  Hosea Pickett b. April 27, 1816

8.  Hannah b. March 12, 1818

9.  Nathaniel b. Sept. 8, 1819

10.  Gamaliel b. Jan. 15, 1822

11.  Elizabeth F. b. July 23, 1823; single on Dec. 15, 1824

12.  Louisa b. May 13, 1825; single on Dec. 16, 1824

13.  Mary b. Jan. 14, 1826

14.  Rebecca Jane b. Dec. 16, 1827; m. ____ Childs

     15.  Harriett Caroline b. Sept. 24, 1830; m.       Partin

 


Descendants of Samuel Sellers have compiled information on the activities of this family in Alabama and points west, and have traced the line to modern times.**

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Watters, C.H. (Mrs.), Some descendants of William Sellers, Who Was in Tarboro, N.C. in 1750: 1418 Johnston Drive, Anniston, Alabama, 36201.

 

** John P. Johnston, 253 Nassau Street, Brundidge, Alabama


Records Pertaining to William Sellers, Son of Elisha

 

 

William Sellers is identified as a son of Elisha Sellers in Elisha’s will, dated November 16, 1801. The earliest known record of a William Sellers in Brunswick County is dated May 7, 1780, when a person of that name acted as a chain carrier for Joel Sellers in laying out a land grant survey on the Seven Creeks. In the 1790 census, William Sellers was listed adjacent to Jordan Sellers, son of Benjamin. This suggests that he lived in the general area between the White Marsh and the South Carolina border, where Ben­jamin had lived prior to 1790. William was head of a household that consisted of 1 male over 16, 3 males less than 16, and 4 females. It is interesting to note that the numbers and ages of the male children in this household correspond to the supposed children of Amelia Sellers, who may have been Joel Sellers’ widow (see profile on The Family of Amelia Sellers of Columbus County).

 

As neither Joel nor Amelia Sellers appeared as head of a family in the 1790 census, it seems possible that she and her child­ren were represented by this listing for William. Deed records discussed in the above profile show that Benjamin’s family and the supposed children of Amelia Sellers were associated during much of their adult lives. The presence of Jordan Sellers, Benjamin’s oldest son, next, door to William’s household in 1790 lends support to the idea that the children may have been Joel’s. Presumably, Wil1iam was acting as the head of the household.

 

Brunswick County court minutes show that William Sellers pro­duced a recognizance bond for James Corbett. Corbett appeared and was released from this bond at the October, 1794, session of court. James Corbett owned land on the west side of Gum Swamp in l794, in the vicinity of land owned by the families of Matthew Sellers and Amelia Sellers. Jordan Sellers, son of Matthew, sold land on Gum Swamp on May 15, 1819 (Columbus Co. deeds). These data indicate that William lived in the area of residence of Amelia’s family.

 

William Sellers was not listed as head of a household in 1800, but a Milleford Sellers, believed to be Amelia (“Milly”) was listed in Bladen County. The profile on Amelia demonstrates that lands owned by her supposed children were in Bladen County in 1800, but became part of Columbus County with the formation of that county in 1808. Thus, it seems possible that William was either married to Joel’s widow for a time, or was looking after his uncle’s family in 1790 and thus was listed as head of the household by the census taker.

 

William was of age by the time of Elisha’s will in 1801, as he received one shilling from his father’s estate. In the 1810 census, there is a listing for W. Sellers, who was head of a house­hold consisting of 1 male 26-45, 1 male 0-10, 1 female 0-10, and 1 female 10-16. It is not clear whether this listing represents William Sellers or Willets Sellers, another son of Elisha.


On July 28, 1812, a marriage bond was posted for William Sellers and Eleanor Edwards, with Matthew Sellers as a witness. William Sellers enlisted as a private in Capt. A.C. Grissetts Company of the Brunswick Regiment of the North Carolina Militia on July 23, 1814. He served 5 days, travelling 78 miles to the rendezvous point (War of 1812 Service Records, National Archives). He also served in the call-up of militia in September, 1814, and was posted to Wilmington for guard duty (Muster Roll of the Soldiers of the War of 1812: N.C. Adjutant General’s Office, 1873).

 

On February 15, 1815, William received a grant for 100 acres on the east side of the New Britton Road (A/340). A John Sellers was a chain carrier for the survey. On December 6 of the same year, he was granted 100 acres more on both sides of New Britton Road. He sold the latter parcel to Benjamin Sellers, probably his brother, on April 27, 1816 (G/277). The former may be the parcel that was sold on August 30, 1830, by John F. Sellers (M/227). If this is true, then John F. was apparently an heir of William and was probably the John Sellers who assisted in the survey of Wi1liam’s grant.

 

Later records under the name William Sellers are believed not to pertain to William, son of Elisha (see profile on William H. Sellers of Northwest District).


Records Pertaining to Willets Sellers, Son of Elisha

 

 

Willets Sellers was born about 1783, according to available census data. A deed filed in 1808, however, indicates that he was granted 100 acres of land on July 11, 1788 (E/394). As Willets would have been only about 5 years old at the time, it appears probable that his father, Elisha Sellers, obtained the grant in Willets’ name, as he did for his other son John Bryant Sellers. Perhaps Elisha regarded the land grants as trust funds for his younger children.

 

On March 7, 1798, Willets witnessed his brother Thomas’ purchase of land on the Shallotte River, “at a place called John Hall’s” (D/174). At this time, he would have been about 15 years old, according to census records. In the 1800 census or Bruns­wick County, a Willis Sellers is listed, age 16-26, with one female, age 16-26.

 

On July 28, 1800, Willis Sellers was granted 100 acres on the east side of the Waccamaw, “including his improvements” (A/179). He was granted 100 additional acres on both sides of Starboard Swamp, joining the old lands of Elisha, on December 8, 1802. Henry Mince and Benjamin Sellers were chain carriers. On August 1, 1803, Willets sold 100 acres on both sides of Starboard Swamp to a Benjamin Sellers, possibly his brother (E/39). In January, 1805, he served on the county jury. The county court granted Willets a license to sell spirituous liquors at his home, on January 27, 1806, and on April 25, 1808, appointed him constable of the Wacca­maw District, He served on the jury in April, 1807.

 

A marriage bond between Willets Sellers and Sarah Thompson was recorded on May 13, 1808, indicating that he was married at least twice.

 

On June 25, 1808, Willets sold 100 acres on the east side of the Waccamaw, on Long Branch, to Hugh Stanaland. This was the land originally granted to Willets in 1788 (E/394). The sale was recorded by the court on July 25, to Hugh Jacob Stanaland. The next month, Willets sold Jacob Stanaland 100 acres on Pine Log Branch, on the east side of the Waccamaw, on July 18, 1808 (E/392). This was probably the parcel of A/179.

 

 

Willets then bought 100 acres on Starboard Swamp, adjoining John B. Sellers’ land, from John Clewes, on February 20, 1810. Willets’ brother-in-law, Henry Mintz, witnessed the deed (F/72).

 

In 1810, a “W. Sellers”, age 26-45, with one male 0-10 and two females, 0—10 and 10—16, was listed in the census.

 

On July 12, 1810, Willets sold 180 acres on both sides of Starboard Branch to Samuel Gause. Witnesses were Henry Mintz and Benjamin Sellers (F/71). A Willis Sellers served on the county jury in the October, 1811, session, and in the July, 1813, session, Willets, among other heirs of Elisha, recorded the sale of his interest in Elisha’s land to his uncle, Benjamin Sellers. In the July, 1811, session, be was among the men appointed to lay off a road from William Gause’s to Pireway, to be overseen by Henry Mintz.


Willets’ name, which undoubtedly was obtained from his mother’s surname, was sometimes spelled “Willis” by recorders. After 1810, another individual with the same name and spelling variations appeared in the records of Brunswick County. This person lived in the Town Creek District and was often recrded in court minutes as “Willets Sellers T.C.”, no doubt to distinguish him from Elisha’s son of the Waccamw, and later lockwoods Folly, District. It appears that Elisha’s son Willets was not listed in the 1820 census as the head of a household, and the entry for “Willis” pertains to the Town Creek person.

 

 

In 1815, Willets was not listed on the tax roll in the Wac­camaw District; neither was his name on the lists of jurors in subsequent years. This may imply that he was no longer a freehold­er in the county after that time. On August 10, 1816, Willets witnessed a purchase by his brother Thomas of 75 acres on the north side of Caw Caw Swamp (H/25l).

 

In the 1830 census, a Willis Sellars is listed as head of a household, with 1 male 10-15, lmale 15-20, 1 male 20-30, 1 male 40-50, 1 female 15-20, 1 female 20-30, and 1 female 50-60. From its association with other names of known place of residence, this listing could be for either the Town Creek Willets or for the son of Elisha; the age range, however, is correct for the latter individual.

 

In the 1840 census, a Willets Sellers, 50-60, was listed with a family consisting of 1 male 10-15, 1 male 15-20, 1 female 20-30, and 1 female 50-60. On March 6, 1840, Willets Sellers bought land from Philip Hewitt. There is no description of this property but the Hewitts were populous in the west end of the county and not in the east end. Therefore, this deed probably pertains to Elisha’s son. The deed was witnessed by Benjamin G. Sellers (N/185).

 

 

On January 19, 1849, Willets Sellers deeded 50 acres of land to his son Benjamin G. Sellers (0/536). This person was identified in the court minutes of December, 1838, as Benjamin Griffin Sellers. Asbury Sellers, who appears only briefly in the records of Brunswick County, recorded his cattle mark at the December, 1839, court, This mark was identical to Benjamin G.’s mark, but reversed. This suggests that Asbury and Benjamin G. were members of the same family. No age range is known for Asbury Sellers but based on the date of his marriage bond to Sarah Hewett (January 2, 1843), he is here tentatively identified as Willets’ youngest son.

 

The 1850 census shows Willets, 67, and Mary Sellers, 65, as the only members of a household in the Lockwoods Folly District.

 

Possible children of Willets Sellers, son of Elisha Sellers, as deduced from the records cited above, include:

 

Female b. 1794-1800

Female b. 1800-1810

Male b. 1800-1810

Female b. 1810-1820

Benjamin Griffin b. ca. 1818

Asbury b. 1825-1830


Records Pertaining to Benjamin Sellers of Waccamaw and Shallotte

 

 

An individual named Benjamin Sellers lived in the Shallotte and Waccamaw Districts of Brunswick County during the early 1800’s. His presence was recorded on documents dated 1803 to 1835. These documents are distinguishable from those pertaining to the elder Benjamin Sellers, who was one of the original Sellers immigrants from Edgecombe County, by the fact that the elder Benjamin was resident in Horry County, South Carolina, returning to live in Brunswick County for only a year prior to his death in 1817; and by later references to them in deeds of the younger Benjamin.

 

Presently available information does not show Benjamin’s relation to the other Sellers of the area. Property associations with known sons of Elisha Sellers suggest that Benjamin may also have been a son of Elisha. There may be other information in private sources that demonstrates that this was the case, as a D.A.R. application filed in 1974 (D.A.R. National No. 595146) stated that a Benjamin was among Elisha’s sons. However, no supporting evidence was cited.

 

The only known census listing that might pertain to this Benjamin Sellers is the 1830 record, which shows that he was born between 1780 and 1790. The earliest record attributable to him is dated August 1, 1803, when a Benjamin Sellers purchased 100 acres on both sides of Starboard Swamp from Willets Sellers, Elisha’s son (E/39). This parcel was later sold (F/90). Benjamin Sellers also appeared as a witness to a sale of land on Starboard Swamp by Willets in July, 1810 (F/71). That same month, Benjamin was appointed Constable of the Waccamaw District by the county court, in place of Samuel Sellers, Elisha’s son.

 

In July, 1811, he was appointed as part of a committee to lay off a road from the “seashore road, near William Gauses”, to Pireway, along with Elisha and Willets Sellers; and in February, 1812, was made overseer of a crew to clear this road. Samuel Sellers was a member of the crew. On August 6, 1812, Benjamin enlisted as a private in Capt. Caleb Stephens Company of the 3rd (Brunswick) Regiment, N.C. Militia, and served until December 12, 1812. He was detached to a command under Maj. John A. Lillington, which was stationed at Deepwater Point (War of 1812 Service Records, National Archives).

 

On April 10, 1813, Benjamin purchased from the surviving heirs of Elisha Sellers lands that were bequeathed to John B. Sellers, then deceased (H/459). A later deed (K/327) that postdates the death of Benjamin the elder by some 18 years indicates clearly that Benjamin the younger was the purchaser of this property, and not Benjamin the elder. The deed for this purchase was proved in the July, 1813, session of the county court.

 

 

The North Carolina Militia was mustered again in the last week of July, 1813, and Benjamin Sellers served again, this time as a sergeant in Capt. John Gause’s Company, for 10 days. His record


shows that he travelled 36 miles to the rendezvous point (War of 1812 Service Records, National Archives).

 

Benjamin was appointed Justice for Elections for the Shallotte District by the July, 1814, court, indicating that he was probably living on the Starboard Swamp land by then (Starboard Swamp was a branch of the Shallotte River, probably Shallotte Creek of modern naps). On November 24, 1815, he was granted 100 acres on the north side of Wet Ash Swamp (A/341), and he was recorded on the tax list for that year as owning land on Starboard Swamp, Wet Ash, and Bear Branch.

 

On April 27, 1816, Benjamin bought 100 acres on both sides of New Britton Road from William Sellers (a son of Elisha), adjoining Milliken’s corner (G/277). On August 10, 1816, he and Willets Sellers witnessed the purchase of land on Caw Caw Swamp by Thomas Sellers, son of Elisha (H/251). On July 29, 1817, he bought 100 acres on the west side of Starboard Swamp from John and Sarah McClelland, Elisha’s son-in-law and daughter (H/37). This deed was proved in the October 1817, session of the county court.

 

Benjamin was appointed Inspector of Polls for the Shallotte District by the July, 1818, court and constable of that district by the January, 1819, court. He was discharged from the latter post in January, 1820. He served on the county jury in January, 1822. On August 2, 1823, he bought 200 acres on Bear Branch from Moses Milliken (J/1l6). He served again on the jury of October, l824.

 

On March 10, 1827, Benjamin sold 100 acres on the north side of Wet Ash Swamp, the deed making reference to his patent for that land which was received in 1812 (K/141). The 1830 census listed Benjamin Sellers as head of a household containing 1 male 40-50, 1 male 90-100, 1 female 10-15, 1 female 15-20, and 1 female 30-40. Adjacent was listed Howe Sellers, 40-50, with a household contain­ing 3 females 0-5, 1 female 5-10, 1 female 10-15, and 1 female 30-40.

 

In June, 1830, Benjamin bought Lot 6 of Benjamin Blaney’s estate from Nancy Blaney (K/113); the deed was proved in that month’s court session. On September 5, 1830, he bought 250 acres of land on Emporer Branch from Thomas Wescott (K/206), the deed being proved at the March, 1832, court. Benjamin’s cattle mark was recorded in the December, 1832, session.

 

On March 7, 1833, he sold 640 acres on “Dutchman” (probably Dutchman’s Creek) that he had bought from Nancy Blaney (K/321). In December, 1833, the court registered a deed for the sale of 100 acres on Starboard Swamp by Benjamin Sellers to Jesse Bennett. On January 4, 1834, Benjamin sold 250 acres on Emperial Branch (M/37), followed by his purchase of 250 acres on the same branch on December

17, 1834 (L/129).

 

 

Benjamin sold 100 acres on Starboard Swamp on February 26, 1835. The deed stated that this parcel of land was purchased on April 10,
1813, at “the different of John B. Sellers” (K/327). This is a reference to the purchase of inheritance rights from Elisha’s heirs by Benjamin as described in H/459.

 

No further records are known of this individual.


Records Pertaining to Thomas Sellers, Son of Elisha

 

 

Data from census records indicate that Thomas Sellers was born about 1768. Records citing the name Thomas Sellers date from July 9, 1792, when a grant was entered in Thomas’ name for 50 acres on both sides of Starboard Swamp. Elisha and Willets Sellers, his father and brother, were chain carriers. No issue date is recorded for this grant. Thomas was appointed to jury duty by the county court in July, 1793, and from that time, he served periodically through December, 1830.

 

Thomas’ name did not appear in the 1790 census when, according to later records, he would have been about 22 years old. He reg­istered his cattle earmark at the court of April 11, 1796. On March 7, 1798, he bought 320 acres of land on the main branch of the Shallotte River “at a place called John Halls”. This deed was witnessed by Thomas’ brother Willets and by Elisha E. Selfer(?), possibly his father Elisha Sellers (D/174).

 

In 1800, there were two entries in the census for the name Thomas Sellers. As the listings for individuals in the two house­holds are nearly identical, it is possible that these are duplicate entries for the same household. This record listed Thomas as the head of a household consisting of 1 male 26-45, 3 males 0—10, 3 males 10-16, and 1 female 26-45 years old. On August 13, 1801, Thomas sold the land he had purchased on the Shallotte River (E/50). On November 16, 1801, Elisha Sellers signed his will, in which he named Thomas, among other children. Elisha appointed his “dutiful son Thomas Sellers” as his executor. Thomas received one shilling from the estate, along with the other grown children.

 

Evidently, Thomas lived in the vicinity of the Waccamaw River, for we see from records of 1805 that he sold. 100 acres on the north side of Wet Ash on June 22, with his brother Matthew as a witness (E/234). This was in the vicinity of land bought by James Sellers in 1796 and 1803 (D/94 and E/95), most of which James sold in 1808 (F/27). A John Sellers also bought 120 acres on the north side of the Wet Ash in January, 1815 (G/266); and a Benjamin Sellers (poss­ibly Elisha’s son) was granted 100 acres on the north side of Wet Ash in November of the same year (A/34l). Thomas was appointed to work on the road from Robesons to John Wards ferry in the July session of the court; and he was excused from the road work and appointed instead to work on the river in the October session.

 

In the 1810 census, Thomas was listed as “T. Sellers”, over 45 years of age, with a household consisting of 3 males 0—10, 1 male 10-16, 2 males 16-26, 3 females 0-10, 2 females 10-16, and 1 female

16-26. This listing was 1 space from “M. Sellers” (probably his brother Matthew). On April 10, 1813, Thomas and other heirs of Elisha Sellers sold their interests in Elisha’s land on Starboard Swamp to a Benjamin Sellers, who was possibly another son of Elisha (H/459). Thomas was not included in the 1815 tax list for Brunswick
County. However, on August 10, 1816, he purchased 75 acres of land on the north side of Caw Caw Swamp, his brother Willets and a Benjamin Sellers (possibly also his brother) acting as witnesses (H/251).

 

Thomas was granted 300 acres on the south side of the Waccamaw, on Bear Branch, on December 22, 1817 (I/28). He sold the land on August 6 of the following year, his brother Samuel Sellers acting as a witness (H/331). Thomas is not listed as the head of a house­hold in the surviving records of the 1820 census. On December 1, 1823, he bought 100 acres of land on Cherry Tree Branch of Bell Swamp in Town Creek, from John Raybourn (J/l30), but sold the same parcel on August 17, 1825 (J/l46).

 

On the 1830 census record, Thomas was listed as 60-70 years of age, with 1 female 10-15, 1 female 15-20, and 1 female 50-60 in his household. He was not listed as the head of a household in the 1840 census.

 

On April 12, 1841, Thomas Sellers was granted 50 acres on the north side of Fall Swamp, a branch of the Lockwoods Folly River. The grant included “Samuel’s improvement” and was adjacent to “Elisha’s corner” (M/390). Thus, Thomas was closely associated with Elisha Sellers (ca. 1795 -- 187-) of Lockwoods Folly, who owned land on the adjacent Royal Oak Branch; and with an individual who may have been Samuel J. Sellers.

 

The 1850 census for the Lockwoods Folly District listed Thomas Sellers and Sarah Sellers, 82 and 78 years old, in the family of Frederick Arnold (probably a son-in-law) and his wife Sarah (b. ca. 1815). Frederick Arnold also owned land on the Royal Oak at that time, which he had bought in 1845 (N/490). In 1844, Thomas Sellers had acted as a witness to Arnold’s purchase of land in the same area from Jordan Raboun (P/376).

 

Thus, we see that Thomas spent his life in the area of the Waccamaw and Lockwoods Folly, and that he had as many as 9 sons and 5 daughters. The ages given for the oldest female are not completely consistent but are sufficiently so to suggest that Thomas had only one wife. Thus far, none of these children have been definitely identified from the data available. However, there is strong evidence that suggests that Elisha Sellers of Lockwoods Folly, Samuel J. Sellers, and Sarah Arnold may have been among them. This evidence is discussed in detail in the profiles on Elisha III and Samuel J. Sellers.


Records Pertaining to Elisha Sellers of Lockwoods Folly

 

(Elisha III)

 

 

Elisha Sellers (ca. 1795 -- 187-) lived a few miles north or northwest of present-day Supply. His children and later descendants are well represented in census and other records, and were the subject of a detailed compilation by Mrs. L. Berlyn Lancaster, of Supply, which was published ln 1957*. It is not the purpose of this profile to repeat the work of Mrs. Lancaster, but to account for Elisha’s whereabouts during his lifetime and to examine possible evidence as to his origins.

 

The will of Elisha Sellers I (the son of Benjamin Sellers), written in 1801, mentioned a grandson named Elisha Sellers, it is possible that this was a reference to the subject of this profile, who would have been about 6 years old at the time. However, it could have instead referred to the Elisha Sellers who resided west of the Waccamaw and who was listed in the 1820 through 1850 census records of Columbus County (here referred to as Elisha II). The latter individual would have been about 16 years old at the time of the will. Although it cannot be proven on the basis of presently available evidence, it appears likely that Elisha of Lockwoods Folly (here referred to as Elisha III) was the person mentioned in the will of Elisha I. This is because of an association between Thomas Sellers, who was a son of Elisha I, and Elisha III that is demon­strated in property deeds. This suggests that Elisha III may have been a son of Thomas. If Elisha I had had two grandsons of the same name at the time of his will, it seems extremely unlikely that he would not have been more specific by naming his heir’s father.

 

The earliest known record pertaining to Elisha Sellers III is a muster list of the 3rd N.C. Militia Regiment (The Brunswick Reg­iment) of 1814 (N.C. Adjutant General’s Office, 1873). A pension application by Elisha states that he served in Capt. John Gause’s Company of this regiment at Deepwater Point and Shallotte Inlet (War of 1812 Pension Applications, National Archives). A marriage bond between Elisha and Ann Hickman was posted on July 31, 1815. According to a statement in his bounty application for his 1812 service, Elisha and Ann were married at “Waccamaw” in 1809. Elisha was 71 at the time of this statement and it appears that his recollect­ion was incorrect, as this would have made him only about 10 years old at the time of his marriage.

 

In 1819, Elisha Sellers bought 90 acres of land on the north

side of Caw Caw Swamp (J/l41), where Thomas Sellers had purchased

75 acres in 1816 (H/251). In the 1820 census, Elisha was listed as

the head of a household consisting of 1 male 18-26, 2 males 0-10,

1 female 16-26, 2 females 0-10, and 2 slaves. As the couple had

 

*L. Berlyn Sellers Lancaster, 1957, Our Family: Supply, N.C.
been married only 5 years, it seems unlikely that all four of the younger children were theirs. Only one of the individuals listed, besides Elisha and Ann, appears on subsequent census listings in Elisha’s household. It is possible that most of the children were siblings, nieces or nephews of Ann and/or Elisha.

 

Elisha Sellers was listed on Brunswick County juries in January, 1821, and October, 1822. On December 8, 1825, he bought an un­specified amount of land on the Royal Oak from Alfred Galloway (K/171). This was four months after Thomas Sellers’ sale of property on Cherry Tree Branch, which Thomas had held for two years (J/130 and J/146). On October 26, 1827, Elisha bought 100 acres on Willets Mill Creek from Samuel Robinson (K/39). If the stream referred to is Willets Branch of Mill Creek, this location was some 12 miles east of the first purchase. This was followed on April 24, 1829, by the purchase of 200 acres “on a branch of the Lockwoods Folly River” from John Gilbert (M/295). This was shown by a later deed (0/514) to be the Royal Oak Branch. Elisha served on juries in March, 1828, and March, 1829.

 

In the 1830 census, Elisha Sellers was listed as head of a household consisting of 1 male 30-40, 1 male 10-15, 1 male 5-10, 2 males 0-5, 1 female 30-40, 1 female 5-10, and 1 female 0-5. No other Sellers were listed nearby. Evidently, Elisha was living on the Caw Caw Swamp land at the time, as he was appointed Constable for the Shallotte District by the county court on March 1, 1830.

 

On March 5, 1831, Elisha sold his 90-acre parcel of land on the northwest side of Caw Caw Swamp “at the mouth of Cow Branch” to Samuel Sellers. Witnesses were Robert Swain and Elisha H. Sellers (K/155). As Elisha H.(ugh) Sellers (b. ca. 1808, after the will of Elisha I) was a son of Samuel Sellers and a grandson of Elisha I, it appears probable that the Samuel of this deed was the son of Elisha I. Both Samuel and Elisha H. Sellers moved away to Alabama about 1834.

 

Elisha served on the superior court jury in the March, 1831, term of court. In the June, 1831, session, he was appointed to road maintenance duty, from the forks of the Smithville road near Mrs. Swain’s to the Lockwoods Folly River upper bridge. He served on the jury again in the September session, and in the sessions of January, 1835 and June, 1836. In June, 1837, Elisha and his son Hanson Kelly Sellers were assigned to work on the road from Pinch Gut to the fork at Robert Clemmons. In the December, 1837, session, Elisha was paid $200 by the sheriff for building a bridge over the Lockwoods Folly River at the old courthouse. He served again on the jury of December, 1839.

 

In the 1840 census, Elisha was listed as head of a household consisting of 1 male 40-50, 1 male 10-15, 1 male 5-10, 1 male 0-5, 1 female 40-50, 1 female 20-30, 3 females 15-20, and 1 female 10-15. On September 8, 1840, Elisha bought 618 acres from Abram Baker. This land was adjoined on the south side by the Lockwoods Folly River and on the north side by Levi Swain (M/226). On December 3, 1842, Elisha bought a total of 620 acres on the west side of the Lockwoods Folly River from Thomas Smith of Wlimington (M/430). Thus,
he at one time owned nearly two square miles of land in the same area.

 

Thomas Sellers’ grant of April, 1841, on Fall Swamp adjoined a corner of Elisha’s land. This was probably either Elisha’s hold­ing on the Royal Oak as described in K/171 or the parcel of M/295.

 

On July 23, 1842, Elisha gave his son Hanson K. Sellers 100 acres of land that he had obtained from John Gilbert (0/514). He served on juries in June, 1844 and June, 1847. On January 9, 1849, he bought 200 acres more in the Fall Swamp -- Royal Oak area from Joel Cason (0/509). In the March, 1849, session of court, the description of a road maintenance assignment mentioned “Elisha Sellers’ old place on the South Carolina road” at the junction of the road to Boone’s Landing. Elisha served on the jury of Sept­ember, 1849.

 

In the 1850 census, Elisha Sellers, 65, and Anny Sellers, 70, were listed as a household in the Lockwoods Folly District next door to the household of Elisha Sellers, 23. Twenty listings away was Willets Sellers, 67, son of Elisha I; and 32 listings away, Thomas Sellers, 82, Willets’ brother, in the household of Frederick Arnold. Elisha served on juries in April, 1850, June, 1851, and June, 1852. In the September, 1852, session, he was appointed to a committee to lay out a road from Nathaniel Little’s to the Wilm­ington road, where it met the Smithville road. On March 1, 1854, Elisha Sellers and Frederick Arnold jointly bought several parcels of land on the Lockwoods Folly River (S/272).

 

On the basis of association and relative ages, it seems likely that Thomas Sellers may have been Elisha’s father. The association between Elisha and Frederick Arnold, who was probably Thomas’ son-in-law, supports this idea. The 1810 census listing for Thomas contains 2 males 16-26 years old, one of whom could have been Elisha. However, no definite proof of the identity of Elisha’s father has yet been found.

 

In the 1860 census, Elisha, 70, and Anna Sellers, 66, were listed alone in a household. On February 27 of that year, Elisha sold Hanson K. Sellers 200 acres more land on the Royal Oak (S/566).

 

Neither Elisha nor Ann Sellers appeared in the 1870 census record. However, they were alive on July 10, 1870, when Elisha applied for a bounty land warrant on the basis of his service in the War of 1812. The application was rejected on the grounds that there was no proof of his service in the records of the Federal govern­ment. Unfortunately, Elisha did not request support from the North Carolina Adjutant General’s Office, which did have record of his service.


The children of Elisha Sellers III and Ann Hickman Sellers, as enumerated from Mrs. Lancaster’s compilation and census data, included:

 

Hanson Kelly Sellers b. ca. 1818, d. after 1880;

m.  Harriett Hewett

 

Mary Amanda Sellers b. Feb. 22, 1822, d. March 5, 1864;

 

m. Levi Swain b. Feb. 24, 1823, d. Oct. 28, 1876

 

Female b. 1820-25

 

Female b. 1820-25

 

Elisha Sellers b. ca. 1827, d. 190-; m. Mary Elizabeth Price

 

John Sellers b. 1825-30, d. before 1870 (as a prisoner in the War Between the States, according to Mrs. Lancaster);

m.  Elizabeth Pigott

 

William Riley Sellers b. ca. 1833, d. after 1900;

m.  Louise Clemmons


Records Pertaining to Samuel J. Sellers and His Children

 

 

Samuel J. Sellers of Town Creek was born about 1793 -- 1795, according to the 1850 and 1860 census records of Brunswick County. The earliest known record of his name is a deed dated December 24, 1825, in which he acted as a witness to a sale of land on Middle Swamp from Joseph Flowers to Bennet Flowers (K/21). This person is not to be confused with the Samuel J. Sellers (b. ca. 1809) who was a son of Samuel Sellers and who moved to Alabama with Samuel in 1834.

 

A record of military service during the War of 1812 may pertain to Samuel J., as he would have been 18 to 20 years old at the time (10 days in July, 1813). The individual of that record served as a corporal in Capt. John Gause’s Company of the Brunswick Regiment of N.C. Militia. The pay receipt for this service is signed “Saml Sellers” (War of 1812 Service Records, National Archives). In later life, Samuel J. Sellers signed documents with the mark “SS”. It cannot be determined, therefore, whether this military record applies to him or to Samuel Sellers, son of Elisha (b. ca. 1788).

 

 

In the 1830 census, Samuel J. Sellers was listed as the head of a household adjacent to Arthur Robbins, son of Arthur Robbins, Sr., and Penelope Sellers Robbins. Two doors away was the house­hold of Lewis Sellers. Samuel’s household consisted of 1 male 15-20, 1 male 10-15, 1 male 5-10, 2 males 0-5, 1 female 20-30, and 2 females 5-10. On the basis of other records, it appears that the age of the oldest male in this household does not represent the age of Samuel J. Sellers. The fact that he was listed adjacent to Arthur Robbins and near Lewis Sellers suggests a close relation­ship with one or both of these two individuals. Samuel may have been living on land belonging to either individual, as there is no known record of his acquiring land of his own. Arthur Robbins and Lewis Sellers lived in the area between Bell Swamp and Mill Creek at the time. Bennet Flowers, also listed nearby, owned land on Middle Swamp.

 

In the 1840 census, Samuel was head of a household with 1 male 45-50, 1 male 10-15, 1 male 5-10, 1 male 0-5, 1 female 40-50, 1 female 15-20, and 2 females 5-10. The names of nearby residents indicate that he lived in the Middle Swamp Mill Creek area at the time. Lewis Sellers was deceased by 1840.

 

The county, court minutes for March, 1843, record that Samuel

J. Sellers was discharged from his duty as overseer of the road from the 9-mile Post to Steward P. Ivey’s. The latter individual was a resident of the Lockwoods Folly District. No record has been found of Samuel’s appointment to this duty.

 

In 1850, the census recorded Samuel J. Sellers as head of a household in the Town Creek District consisting of Samuel J., 57; Nancy, 53; John, 21; Matilda, 19; Sarah, 17; and Samuel, 13. He was shown as owning no real estate, although his sons John and Thomas did. Thomas A. Sellers, 24, a son of Samuel J., was listed adjacently. Thomas G. Sellers, a son of Lewis Sellers, was listed


three entries away. Angeline Sellers, 23, and Robert Sellers, 3, were listed in the household of George Montgomery, 40, and his wife Mary, 36, three entries away.

 

In 1860, Samuel J. was shown as 65 years old, with Ann, 67, Sarah J., 26, and Samuel W., 22, In his household. Adjacent was John W. Sellers, 29, Samuel’s son, who was head of his own house­hold. Samuel J. ‘s daughter Matilda Swain lived with her husband Daniel 12 entries away; and 13 entries away, Robert Sellers, 12, was recorded in the household of James Reynolds. In the 1850 census, James Reynolds had been listed in the household of George Montgomery along with Angeline and Robert Sellers.

 

The 1870 census listed Samuel Sellers as 62 years old and head of a household consisting of Drusilla, 51, Matilda, 40, Sarah J., 36, Samuel, 30, Henrietta, 13, and John, 7. Matilda, Henrietta and John were Swains, the widow and children of Daniel Swain. Adjacent was the household of Eliza Sellers, 35, the widow of Samuel’s son John, and her children.

 

In the 1880 census, Samuel J. Sellers was shown as 77 years old. Annie, 61, Samuel J., Jr., 44, and Sarah J., 47, listed as his wife, son, and daughter, were included in the household. Listed adjacent to Samuel were the households of Eliza Sellers and Matilda Swain. Two listings away was the household of Frederick Arnold, 30, the son of Frederick Arnold who was Thomas Sellers’ neighbor and associate in Lockwoods Folly (see profile on Thomas, son of Elisha).

 

The identity of Samuel J. Sellers’ father is not definitely known. However, considerable indirect evidence of it exists. That evidence is summarized and discussed here.

 

In the 1810 census, four Sellers households with males of the right age to be Samuel J. Sellers were listed in Brunswick County. These were: 1) Mary Sellers, of Northwest District; 2) Abram Sellers, of Northwest District; 3) James Sellers, of Town Creek District; and 4) Thomas Sellers, of the Waccamaw District. Of these, the records show that Samuel J. Sellers lived in the vicinity of James and Thomas, but not Mary and Abraham. Profiles of the act­ivities and whereabouts of Abraham, James and Thomas have been prepared from available records on these individuals. Present evidence shows that Samuel J. was most closely associated with Thomas Sellers.

 

Although earlier records show that Thomas owned land in the Waccamaw District, by 1825 he had purchased and sold a parcel of land on Cherry free Branch, a tributary of Bell Swamp, on which Lewis Sellers lived (J/130 and J/146). This suggests a possible association between Thomas and Lewis, as well as with Arthur Robbins, Thomas’ uncle by marriage, who lived on nearby Mill Creek. Further, it places Thomas less than 5 miles from Middle Swamp in 1825. In that year, Samuel J. Sellers acted as a witness to a sale of land on the Middle Swamp (K/2l). The fact that Samuel J. and Arthur
Robbins were listed adjacently in the 1830 census shows Samuel’s presence in the vicinity of Mill Creek and Bell Swamp. Close neighbors of Thomas Sellers at that time indicate that he was living in the Waccamaw or Shallotte District. The 1840 census listed Samuel J. among several residents of the Middle Swamp -- Bell Swamp area, a few miles south and west of modern Bolivia.

 

On April 12, l841, Thomas Sellers received a grant on the Fall Swamp, near modern Supply and adjacent to Elisha Sellers’ property. The grant was described as “including Samuel’s improvement”. Shortly afterward, we see that a Samuel J. Sellers was appointed as overseer of road repairs in the same area, according to the court minutes of March, 1843. These records suggest that Samuel J. lived in the Fall Swamp — Royal Oak area between l840 and 1850, and that he was closely associated then with both Thomas and Elisha Sellers. It appears possible that Samuel and Elisha were brothers and the males 16-26 years old who were listed in Thomas’ household in 1810.

 

By the time of the 1850 census, Samuel J. again was recorded as residing in Town Creek and two entries away from Alexander Cox, who lived in the fork of Middle Swamp and Lockwoods Folly. The census record indicates that he owned no real estate at that time; however, his son John W. Sellers, who lived in the same household, was shown as a landowner. In 1850, Thomas Sellers and his wife Sarah were listed in the household of Frederick Arnold, in the Lockwoods Folly District. At that time, Frederick Arnold owned land on the Royal Oak and vicinity, near Elisha Sellers (P/376 and N/490). Sarah Jane, Arnold’s wife, may have been a daughter of Thomas, and was the right age (35) to have been one of the females listed in Thomas’ household of 1830. Earlier, on January 31, 1844, Frederick Arnold had bought 50 acres on the fork of the Beaver Dams and Middle Swamp. Thomas Sellers was a witness(P/376). By October, 1858, however, Frederick Arnold had moved to the banks of Mill Creek, purchasing 320 acres there, including the plantation where he then lived, from Thomas G. Sellers (Lewis’ son; S/207). Elisha Sellers was a witness to this deed.

 

Further reinforcing the premise that there was a link between Thomas Sellers of the Frederick Arnold household in Lockwoods Folly and the family of Samuel J. Sellers is the fact that Samuel J. ‘s daughter Matilda married Daniel Swain, a son of John Swain who was a neighbor of Frederick Arnold in 1850. By the time of the 1860 census, Arnold had moved to the neighborhood in which Samuel J. lived and was listed only four entries away from Samuel. Thomas and Sarah Sellers were not listed in Arnold’s household (or elsewhere).

 

Samuel’s son, John W. Sellers, was granted and purchased several parcels of land in the Middle Swamp area during the period 1844-1849. As John W. was listed in his parents’ household in 1850 and adjacent to it in 1860, it appears that he was the owner of the land on which the family farmed and lived. Samuel J. was a chain carrier for John’s grant of l844, which suggests that the family lived in the area at that time. This was certainly the case by
December, l847, as the court minutes for that session record that John Wickecliffe Sellers, along with Alexander Cox, was appointed to road maintenance duty between the gap and the run of Pinch Gut. Records of the Mill Creek Baptist Church show that Thomas A. Sellers, John’s brother, became a member of that organization on July 10, 1848. The same records show that a Thomas Sellers preached to the congregation on September 13 and 14, 1845. Customarily, Thomas, son of Elisha, did not use a middle initial, while younger men with the same given name did; therefore, this could have been he who preached the sermon. However, the keeper of the church record may not have strictly observed this custom, so the Thomas of this record could also have been either Thomas A. Sellers, Samuel J.’s son; or Thomas G. Sellers, a son of Lewis Sellers.

 

There are no known deeds or grants recording the acquisition or sale of land by Samuel J. Sellers; nor did his name appear on jury lists, which suggests that he was not a freeholder. The refer­ence to “Samuel’s improvement” in the 1841 grant to Thomas suggests that Samuel was already living on unoccupied land adjacent to Elisha on Fall Swamp, prior to Thomas’ receiving the grant.

 

However, two deeds recorded by John W. Sellers, Samuel J.’s son, in 1850 were for the sale of a total of 200 acres in the area of the Royal Oak, one adjoining Elisha’s land (P/710) and the other on Fall Swamp (Q/52). As there is no record of John’s acquiring this land through purchase or grant, this suggests that the land may have passed to him through Thomas (quite possibly his grand­father).

 

One of John’s purchases, ln 1849, was from Ann Flowers (Q/64), a parcel of 100 acres adjacent to land of Bennet Flowers that was acquired by a deed that Samuel J. Sellers had witnessed in 1825 (K/2l). This suggests that Samuel’s family in the late 1840’s lived in the same locality in which Samuel had lived in 1825; and that there may have been a close relationship between the Flowers and the Sellers families over this period.

 

 

A conjectural interpretation of all of the above documented data is as follows: Samuel J. Sellers was a son of Thomas Sellers. During Thomas’ ownership of the land on Cherry Tree Branch of Bell Swamp (from 1823 to 1825), Samuel J. then 28 to 30 years old, formed an alliance with the family of Henry Flowers or close neighbors of the Flowers on Middle Swamp. As census records indicate that Samuel was originally married by 1813 to 1818, this may not have been an alliance through marriage. Samuel and his family were living apart from Thomas Sellers but adjacent to or on the property of Arthur Robbins, Thomas’ first cousin, in 1830. Lewis Sellers, a resident of Bell Swamp, lived two doors away. In 1840, Samuel still lived in the same vicinity but by April, 1841, bad moved to unoccupied land on Fall Swamp, adjacent to Elisha Sellers’ property. This land was granted to Thomas Sellers on that date, and Samuel resided in the Fall Swamp — Royal Oak area at least until March, 1843. Samuel and his family then returned to the Middle Swamp area, where John, Samuel’s son, was granted land in February, 1844, adjacent to children of Henry Flowers. Although Samuel was head of the household, John owned the land on which the family lived during 20 to 30 subsequent years. Presumably, John’s wife Eliza Stephens Sellers became owner of the land after John’s death in 1865.


Thomas Sellers, Samuel J.’s supposed father, lived with a son-in-law and daughter in the Royal Oak area in 1850. By 1860, Thomas had died, and Frederick and Sarah Arnold bad moved to within four doors of Sarah’s brother, Samuel J. Sellers, in the Middle Swamp area.

 

The relationship between Samuel J. and Lewis Sellers is un­clear at this time. None of the census records for Samuel J. indicate that he was old enough to be one of the possible six Sellers brothers who lived in the households of Nathaniel and Lewis Sellers in 1800. Neither is there a listing for a male of the right birth dates in Lewis’ household in later censuses. However, Samuel was closely associated with Lewis in the period 1830-1840.

 

Conceivably, Samuel could have been one of the two males, age 16-26, in the household of James Sellers in 1810. James was possibly a brother of Lewis (see Sellers Families of Town Creek). However, Samuel’s residence in 1841-1843 in the Fall Swamp area associates him with Thomas, as does his later association with Frederick Arnold, Thomas’ probable son-in-law. Further, available property records show that in the period 1820-1840 James resided on the Cape Fear River at the mouth of Sturgeon Creek, approximately 15 miles from Middle Swamp. By 1840, James had emigrated to Alabama. At this time, it appears more likely that Thomas Sellers was Samuel J.’s father.

 

According to ages of children listed in later censuses, Samuel J. Sellers should have been listed as the head of a household in 1820. He is not included in the existing records of that census, which nay not be complete. Neither is there a listing for Thomas Sellers. The absence of both of these listings suggests that the two men may have been listed near one another or even together. At any rate, Samuel J. Sellers is not listed in the Town Creek area either separately or among other Sellers households in the 1820 records. This indicates that he was not living with Arthur Robbins, Lewis Sellers, or other members of the possible 6-brother group of Sellers in that area then (see profile on the Sellers of Town Creek). Unfortunately, the record does not tell us where Thomas lived in 1820. Presumably, he still owned the land he had bought on Caw Caw Swamp in 1816 (H/251), so perhaps was living there.

 

Samuel J. Sellers’ wife Ann or Nancy is shown on the census records as being a native of South Carolina. Birth records of their children suggest that Samuel and Ann were married about 1813 to 1818. Thus, it seems more likely that Samuel lived in the vicinity of the South Carolina border at the time of courtship and marriage, than in the Town Creek area. This lends some support to the idea that he lived with or near Thomas on the Caw Caw Swamp property.

 

Samuel’s wife Ann was blind, according to the 1850 and 1860 census records. It appears from subsequent census records that Ann died and Samuel remarried between 1860 and 1870. In the 1870 record, Drusilla Sellers, some 10 years younger than Ann, was listed as Sam­uel’s wife. It is interesting that Samuel’s age in 1870 and 1880 seems to-have lost about the same number of years.


Samuel J. Sellers evidently died between 1880 and 1900.

 

Children of Samuel J. Sellers, as deduced or determined from census records, were:

 

Male, b. 1815-1820

Male, b. 1820-25

Female, b. 1820-25

Female, b. 1820-25, d. before 1840

Male, b. 1825-30, d. before 1840

Thomas A., b. ca. 1826

John Wickcliffe, b. ca. 1829

Matilda, b. ca. 1831

Sarah Jane, b. May, 1834

Samuel, b. ca. 1838

 

Nothing is presently known of the unnamed children listed above.

 

Thomas A. Sellers married Charity       . He was a member of the Mill Creek Baptist Church by July, 1848. In 1850, Thomas, his wife Charity and children James and William were listed next to Samuel J. Sellers. He was probably the Thomas Sellers who was assigned to work on the road from the 16-mile Post from Wilmington to the run of Pinch Gut, by the March, 1857, court, along with Alex Cox; and again in September, 1858. By 1860, there were three more children. No property records are presently known for Thomas A.

 

On February 8, 1863, Thomas A. Sellers enlisted as a private in Company G, 2nd N.C. Artillery (36th N.C. State Troops) at Ft. Caswell. He was carried on muster lists through August, 1864. He was cap­tured on January 15, 1865, at the Battle of Ft. Fisher and was sent to the Federal prisoner of war camp at Elmira, N.Y., arriving there on February 1, 1865. He was exchanged on February 20, 1865, and was sent to the James River in Virginia. He was registered on the rolls of hospitals in the Richmond area through March 12, 1865, after which there is no further record.

 

In the 1870 census, Charity Sellers is listed as the head of a household that included 3 of her children. She was listed in the 1900 census for the Town Creek District but evidently was deceased by 1910.

 

The children of Thomas A. Sellers and Charity Sellers were:

 

James B. b. ca. 1837; m. Penelope J. Ware July 7, 1870

William R. b. ca. 1849; m. Martha       .

George T. b. ca. 1851; m. Celia       .

Mary Ann b. ca. 1855; m. Z.D. Williams June 2, 1878

Arthur P. b. ca. 1859; single in 1910


John W. Sellers, who was listed as John Wickcliffe Sellers in the minutes of the court of December, 1847, was granted 50 acres on the north side of Long Branch, adjoining Biggs, Pinner, and the head of Long Branch, on February 11, 1844. Samuel J. Sellers was a chain carrier for the survey (N.C. Grant No. 1368). John W. was assigned to maintain the road between the gap and the run of Pinch Gut by the December, 1847, court. On February 19, 1848, he received a grant of 50 acres on Cedar Branch, adjoining Jacob Lewis, Samuel Slight, and Rabon. Thomas Swain and Jordan Reybon were chain carriers. On October 25, 1849, John W. bought 100 acres on Middle Swamp at Flowers’ corner from Anna Flowers. Peter L. Sellers, Lewis’ son, was a witness to the deed (Q/64). This was in the same area as the sale by Joseph Flowers to Bennet Flowers in 1825, which was witnessed by Samuel J. Sellers (K/21). Ann Flowers was a sister of Bennet and Joseph Flowers, and her land was adjacent to that of Bennet (I/129).

 

A week later, on November 2, 1849, John W. bought 100 acres more in the same area, on the edge of Roans Branch at Flowers’ corner, from Arthur Pinner (Q/23). On December 28 of the same year, he was granted an additional 50 acres on Cedar Branch (P/78). He sold this land on February 26, 1850, to John Burney (P/710).

 

John W. Sellers and Eliza Stevens, daughter of Joseph Stevens, were married in New Hanover County on July 31, 1851.

 

On April 7, 1852, John sold 50 acres of his land on Middle Swamp at Joseph Flowers’ corner to Samuel R. Sellers, probably his brother (Q/33). John’s cattle mark was recorded in the March, 1855, session of court; the mark was similar to the one filed for Samuel R. Sellers. On September 15, 1858, John sold 64 acres on “Ron” Branch, beginning at Flowers’ corner, to Daniel Swain, his brother-in-law. Thomas A. Sellers, his brother, was a witness to the deed (T/435). The September, 1858, session of court assigned John W. and Thomas to work on a new road from Rattlesnake Branch to the Georgetown - Wilmington road. John served an the jury in June, 1859.

 

In the 1860 census, John and Eliza Sellers and two children were listed in Town Creek next to Samuel J. Sellers. John W. was named to the county superior court jury in June, 1861.

 

John W. Sellers of Brunswick County enlisted in Company G, 2nd N.C. Artillery (36th N.C. State Troops) on Febrauary 24, 1863, at the age of 37. This age does not agree with ages given for John W. in the 1850 and 1860 censuses. This person was appointed a musician on March 1, 1864, and was captured at the Battle of Ft. Fisher on January 15, 1865. He died of disease in the Federal prison at Elmira, N.Y., on May 14, 1865, and is buried in the National Cemetery there.

 

 

John Sellers of Brunswick County enlisted in the same company on May 14, 1862, at age 34. This age was approximately right for the son of Samuel J. Sellers. This individual was promoted to sergeant on September 1, 1862, and to first sergeant prior to November, 1863.


He was captured at the Battle of Ft. Fisher and taken to Elmira Prison, where he died of disease on March 29, 1865. He is buried at the National Cemetery there.

 

Eliza Stephens Sellers was listed as head of her household and next to Samuel J. Sellers in 1870 and 1880. In 1900, she was still head of her household in Town Creek and was listed as a farmer by occupation, with her son Joseph A. and a grandson, Lenrix Reynolds, 21. Her date of birth was given as June, 1832. She was listed next to the household of Frederick Arnold, the son of the Frederick Arnold with whom Samuel J., Thomas, and Elisha Sellers were all associated.

 

Eliza Sellers was not listed in the 1910 census and presumably was deceased by that time.

 

The children of John W. and Eliza Sellers were:

 

Mary Eliza b. July 14, 1857, d. February 26, 1942;

m. June 7, 1876 Joseph A. Reynolds, son of William and Annis Reynolds.

 

Joseph A. b. April, 1860; described as married in 1892 (JJ/183) but listed alone and single in the 1910 census.

 

John Daniel b. June, 1861, d. March 2, 1925; m. January 22, 1883 Amanda Cox, daughter of Alexander Cox.

 

Matilda Sellers married Daniel Swain, son of John and Charlotte Swain, on November 4, 1857, with Samuel J. Sellers as bondsman. In the 1860 census, Daniel and Matilda Swain, with one child, were 11 entries away from Samuel J. Sellers. Daniel Swain enlisted in Com­pany G of the 20th N.C. Infantry Regiment. The only surviving records of his service show that he was admitted and discharged from Chimborazo Hospital in Richmond with mumps, in September, 1862. Evidently, however, he died while in service. In the 1870 census, Matilda and her two children were listed in the household of Samuel J. Sellers.

 

The children of Daniel and Matilda Sellers Swain were:

 

Henrietta b. ca. 1857; m. Thomas Jefferson Mercer, son of Edward and Susan Mercer, who lived next to Samuel J. Sellers in 1850 and was a near neighbor in 1860 and 1870.

 

John Daniel b. October, 1863; m. Roena       .

 

Both Eliza Sellers and Matilda Sellers Swain lost their hus­bands in the war, and both had male children born during the war. Both boys were named John Daniel, presumably after the two fathers.

 

 

Sarah Jane Sellers was listed in the household of her father Samuel J. Sellers through 1880. In 1900, she was listed as 46 years old and unmarried, in the household of her nephew John D. Swain. No further information on Sarah Jane is presently available.


Samuel Sellers was listed in the household of his father through the 1880 census, when his age was given as 44. His name is listed variously as Samuel (1850), Samuel W. (1860) and Samuel J., Jr. (1880). Samuel R. Sellers’ cattle mark was recorded in the September, 1854, court. John W. Sellers’ mark, which was recorded six months later, was only slightly different. An 1852 deed (Q/33) records his purchase of 50 acres of land on Middle Swamp at Joseph Flowers’ corner from John SW. Sellers. In March, 1857, the county court assigned him to work on the Wilmington - Georgetown road, between the 16-mile Post and the run of Pinch Gut, with Alex Cox, a neighbor of Samuel J., and Thomas Sellers, probably his brother.

 

Nothing further is known of him.


Records Pertaining to the Name John Sellers

in Waccamaw, Shallotte and Lockwoods Folly

 

 

The names John Sellers and John F. Sellers appear in the records of Brunswick County during the period 1815-1829. After that time, the name without the middle initial disappears almost entirely, so that John F. Sellers is the prominent name of record. It is not definite from the available information that these names represent two individuals rather than one. However, it was a common practice to distinguish among persons with the same given name by the use of middle initials in court records. Also, land records and the names of associates suggest that two individuals may be indicated in this case. The appropriate name form accompanies each of the record citations given below.

 

On January 23, 1815, John Sellers bought 120 acres on the north side of Wet Ash Swamp from John Ward (G/266). On February 15, 1815, John Sellers was recorded as a chain carrier in a survey of a 100-acre grant on the New Britton road for William Sellers. Archibald Boazman was also a chain carrier for this survey.

 

On February 23, 1815, a marriage bond between John Sellers and Nancy Boazman was posted, with Matthew Sellers as a witness. As Matthew Sellers, son of Matthew Sellers and grandson of Elisha, had married Mary Boazman four years earlier, this suggests that a close relationship existed between John and Matthew.

 

The 1815 tax list of Brunswick County showed John Sellers as a landowner on Wet Ash Swamp in Waccamaw District. John Sellers was appointed to jury duty by the April, 1820, county court. On May 1, 1820, John Sellers bought 100 acres on the east side of Alligator Swamp, including his improvements, from Ethelred Boazman. Moses McKeithen and John Drew were witnesses (H/327). In the court session of July, 1820, John Sellers was appointed overseer of the road running from Wards Ferry to William Holden’s, beginning at the 9-Mile Post. On January 29, 1821, he sold 100 acres on the east side of Alligator Swamp to Arthur Bennett. Witnesses were David Russ, Jr., and John B. Russ (I/154). In April, 1822, he was again appointed overseer of the road from the 9-Mile Post to Wards Ferry.

 

 

In the July, 1822, session of county court, a lawsuit against John F. Sellers by Benjamin Simmons was recorded.

 

On October 19, 1822, John Sellers sold 100 acres on the north side of Wet Ash, at the mouth of Rooty Branch, to Ethelred Boazman. Thomas Sellers and Ethelred Boazman were witnesses (J/l7). The description of this land is identical with that of a parcel ac­quired by Thomas Sellers in 1804 and sold to Benjamin Ivey in 1805 (E/234).


On July 10, 1823, John Sellers sold 100 acres more to Arthur Bennett. This land was on the south side of the Green Swamp and the east side of Alligator Swamp, at the mouth. Witnesses were Ethelred Boazman, Jr., and Joel Bennett (J/118). We see from this deed and L/154 that John Sellers sold a total of 200 acres on the east side of Alligator Swamp, while present information shows that he bought only 100 acres (H/327).

 

John Sellers was appointed to jury duty at the January, 1824, session of court, and John F. Sellers was appointed at the follow­ing session in April. This suggests that two individuals were represented by these records, as the same person did not usually serve on two consecutive juries. John Sellers was appointed again by the January, 1827, session of court.

 

On February 16, 1827, John F. Sellers bought 50 acres on the west side of Clay Branch, adjoining Brey Blaney, from John Morgan. Witnesses were B. Holden and Moses Hewitt (K/251). The location of this property is not known.

 

On October 15, 1827, John Sellers bought 100 acres on the north branch of the Great Shallotte, called Tharos (?) Branch, adjoining Judah Swain, from Moses Hewitt. E. Boazman was a wit­ness (M/181). If John F. and John were two different people, it seems coincidental that Moses Hewitt should be associated in land transactions with both of them within a period of eight months.

 

John Sellers again was appointed to jury duty by the September, 1829, session of court.

 

A bill of sale from John F. Sellers to Uriah Sullivan was proved in the June, 1830, court. On August 30, 1830, John F. Sellers sold 100 acres on Williams Branch and the New Britton road to Stewart P. Ivey. Witnesses were Benjamin Hewitt and Samuel W. Robinson (M/227). No record is known of the acquisition of this land by either John or John F. Sellers, or other persons.

 

In the 1830 census a John Sellers was listed as head of a household consisting of 1 male 0-5, 1 male 5-10, 1 male 30-40, 1 female 0-5, 1 female 5-10, 2 females 10-15, and 1 female 30-40. It is unclear to whom this record pertains. A John A. Sellers, born about 1795-1800 (based on the age of his wife) lived in the Sturgeon Creek-Indian Creek area at the time. This census record may represent him, rather than either John or John F. Sellers. Another John Sellers was listed as head of a household composed of 1 male 0-5, 1 male 20-30, 1 female 0-5, and 1 female 30-40.

 

John F. Sellers was appointed overseer of the road from Lockwoods Folly bridge to Shallotte bridge by the September, 1831, session of court, which suggests that he was a resident of Lock-woods Folly District.


John F. Sellers was issued a license to sell spirituous liquors by the March, 1832, court. The license was renewed by the December, 1832, and March, 1834, courts. In December, l834, John F. Sellers was again appointed as overseer of the road from Lockwoods Folly bridge to Shallotte bridge.

 

On October 17, 1835, John F. Sellers bought 40 acres on the east side of the Shallotte, joining Moses Hewitt and John Morgan, from Noses Hewitt. Willis Sellers was a witness (L/280). John F. was granted 100 acres on the east side of the Shallotte ad­joining Mast Branch and John Cason’s Tar Landing tract in 1837 (N/35), and an additional 100 acres adjoining the first tract, Williams Branch, Isaac Hewitt, and Gibbs on September 19, 1837 (M/163). A deed of sale from Noses Hewitt to John F. Sellers was recorded in the December, 1839, court. A deed from John Sellers to Reuben Hewitt was proved on the oath of S.P. Ivey in the April, 1840, court.

 

The 1840 census lists only one John Sellers as head of a household, which consisted of 1 male 0-5, 1 male 20-30, 1 male 40-50, 1 female 0-5, 1 female 10-15, 1 female 15-20, and 1 female

30-40.

 

In the June, 1840, court, a deed from Isaac Northrup to John

F. Sellers was proved, on the oath of Asbury Sellers. In the following March session, a deed from John F. Sellers to Jacob Gains was proved. On September 30, 1842, John F. Sellers was granted 50 acres on the south side of Mulberry Swamp.

 

John F. Sellers was appointed to jury duty by the April, 1844, and April, 1845, courts. In the December, 1846, session, a deed from John F. Sellers to James Reaves was proved. The court of March, l847, again appointed John F. Sellers to jury duty.

 

On January 1, 1848, John F. Sellers bought 88 acres from John Bassford, adjoining the estate of Aaron Roberts, deceased, and William Bassford. Witnesses were William M. Mintz and Elias Hewitt (0/440).

 

John F. Sellers is not listed in the 1850 census of Brunswick County and no other court or deed records are known for him. A John F. Sellers was appointed as a patroller in the Shallotte Dist­rict by the March, 1857, court; this was probably not the sane individual.

 

On the basis of the above records, it appears probable, but not definite, that the John Sellers and John F. Sellers of record in the period 1815-1835 were two different individuals. John Sellers appears to have lived in the vicinity of Wet Ash and All­igator Swamps through about 1824. John F. Sellers appears to have lived in Lockwoods Folly, on the east bank of the Shallotte River, from about 1827 to about 1848. John appears to have been associated with Matthew Sellers, Thomas Sellers, and the Boazman family. John F. appears to have been associated with the Hewitt family. Common associations such as property in the New Britton road area
and dealings with Moses Hewitt are confusing.

 

The birth date of John Sellers is not known. John F. Sellers appears to have been born about 1790-1800.


Records Pertaining to Individuals Named James Sellers

 

 

The earliest record of a James Sellers in the lower Cape Fear region is dated 1765, when a person of that name witnessed deeds of two land sales in Duplin County. These deeds are contained in the Sampson County records (1/29 and 1/76). There is no evidence to indicate that this person was identical with the James Sellers of later record in Brunswick County; however, the name does not appear again in Duplin (or Sampson, which was cut from Duplin) County records and the dates are such that the records could represent the same person.

 

A James Sellers was closely associated with the seven known children of Benjamin Sellers, in the White Marsh -- Waccamaw area during the last quarter of the 18th Century. His relationship to them is not known; however, it appears very probable that he was a close relation, based upon location of property and interaction with the seven Sellers siblings. Records suggest that he was of similar age. He may have been a cousin, or perhaps a seventh brother who, for some reason, was not mentioned in any of the papers relating to Benjamin’s estate.

 

He was resident in Brunswick County in 1769, being listed as 1 poll between Joel Sellers and Benjamin Sellers. A grant for

100 acres on the west side of the White Marsh was surveyed for him on September 4, 1770, and was entered on April 18, 1771. Christ­opher Addison and James Sellers were chain carriers. In the 1772 tax roll, James Sellers was listed as 1 poll between Joel Sellers and Simon Sellers. On May 13, 1778, James Sellers sold his 100 acres on the west side of the White Marsh to John McClinnon, witnessed by Benjamin and Matthew Sellers and Mary Duncan (B/105). It is possible that the purchaser of this land was Elisha Seller’s son-in-law, who was named in Elisha’s estate settlement as John McLellan.

 

On December 31, 1778, James was granted 100 acres on the Great Branch in the fork of the Seven Creeks. The survey was carried out on July 8, 1779, with James Sellers, Jr., and William Gore as chain carriers. On October 15, 1783, he was granted 100 acres more in the same area (B/400). James sold one of these 100-acre parcels to William Gore on June 7, 1787 (B/321).

 

In the 1790 census, there are two listings for James Sellers. One, located near Arthur Robbins, who was Penelope Sellers’ husband, was part of a household with 2 males over 16, 5 males under 16, and 3 females. The other household consisted of 1 male over 16 and 1 female. It appears probable that the two listings refer to James of early record in Brunswick County and the James, Jr., of the 1779 survey.

 

James Sellers appeared on the jury lists in county courts of 1794, 1795, 1796 and 1797. In July, 1796, a James Sellers was appointed to work on the “Waggamaw” River from New Britton to the state line. That same month, a James Sellers was granted 300


acres on the east side of the Waccamaw River. A James Sellers bought 50 acres on Possum Branch from William Grissett on July 1, 1796 (D/94). On April 13, 1800, he sold the same land to Thomas Hickman, with John Ward and Isaac Ethelred as witnesses (D/245).

 

In the 1800 census, only one James Sellers was listed, 26-45 years of age with a family consisting of 1 male 0-10, 2 females 0-10, 1 female 26-45, and 1 slave. It appears likely that this was James, Jr., of the 1779 survey. Perhaps James, Sr., was dead by 1800.

 

In October, 1801, James Sellers was again assigned to work on the river, this time between “Joel Hill’s and the province line”. It seems unlikely that this would be the same James who first appeared in the record, and who would have been at least 57 years old by 1801; this reinforces the idea that only a youger James is represented by the post-1790 record. All of the court records probably refer to the youger one, as there was no use of “Jr.”, “Sr.”, or other distinguishing notations in their compilation.

 

On February 3, 1803, James Sellers bought 100 acres on the east side of the Waccamaw and the west side of Soldiers Bay, joining the 50 acres be bought from William Grissett, from Gen. Benjamin Smith of Belvedere (E/85). In the January, 1805, session of the county court, a sale of land by James Sellers to Jonathan Wingate was recorded, and James served as a juryman. In July, 1805, he was assigned to work on the road from Robeson’s to John Ward’s ferry, along with Thomas and Matthew Sellers.

 

On February 6, 1808, he sold the Soldier’s Bay parcel to Edward Wingate (F/27). In 1810, the census showed James Sellers’ household to consist of 2 males 16-26, 1 male over 45, 2 females 10-16, and 1 female over 45. This listing was 12 pages away from known residents of the Town Creek district and 6 pages from Thomas and Matthew Sellers, who lived near the Waccamaw. On April 30 of that year, the court recorded a sale of property to James by Samuel Crews. James served on the jury in the July session of that year.

 

On March 25, 1811, a James Sellers witnessed a sale of property on Mill Creek by Arthur Robbins to Joel Reaves (G/7l). On January 15, 1812, a James Sellers sold 100 acres on the south side of the first branch of Mill Creek, adjoining Edward Sullivan’s upper line, to Arthur Robbins — Penelope Sellers Robbins’ husband or son (G/69). The court recorded a sale by a James Sellers to Levi Standley in the April, 1812 session and to Arthur Robbins in January of 1814.

 

In a property settlement filed with the court on October 31, 1814, Martha Leonard transferred land to James and Elizabeth Sellers, Mary, John and Elizabeth Leonard, and John and Rebecca Holmes. In a deed dated May 5, 1814. (G/128), Martha Leonard is identified as the grandmother of Elizabeth Sellers. Her daughter, Mary Jane Sellers, is also mentioned. The James of this record is identified through other records as James W. Sellers, son of Willets or Willis Sellers of the Town Creek district. Census data show his birthdate as approximately 1804-1810.


 

 

Missing page


In the 1815 tax list, a James Sellers is shown as an owner of property on the Cape Fear River and Sturgeon Creek, within the Town Creek District. This cannot be James W. Sellers, who was 5 to 11 years old at the time. It therefore must be the James of the 1810 census, who at the time was over 45 years old. It appears that this individual moved to Pike County, Alabama by 1840. A James Sellers, 70-80, was enumerated there in the 1840 census near a Joseph Sellers, who probably also lived in Town Creek in the early 1800’s. For a discussion of possible connections between this James Sellers and the other Sellers of the Town Creek area, see “The Sellers Families of Town Creek”.


Records Pertaining to Nathaniel Sellers

 

 

Nathaniel Sellers was listed in the 1800 census of Brunswick County, as head of a household that was composed of 3 males 16-26, I male 26-45, 1 female 16-26, and 1 female 26-45. He was listed adjacent to Lewis Sellers.

 

Nathaniel was on the jury list of the January 27, 1806, county court. In 1810. he again was listed adjacent to Lewis Sellers, as well as to Willis Sellers. He’ was head of a household consisting of 1 male 26-45, 3 females 0-10, and 1 female 26-45.

 

In January, 1810, he was appointed to the Superior Court jury, and again in the July, 1818, session of the court. In 1820, he was included in the jury lists of January and October.

 

He was listed among the members of the Mill Creek Baptist Church ln 1818. His name appears to have been scratched through on the list of 1826, with the notation “Dead” written after the excision.


Records Pertaining to Lewis Sellers

 

 

The earliest record pertaining to Lewis Sellers is a deed dated July 23, 1798, when he bought 50 acres, part of a patent to Jno. Begford in 1735, from Benjamin Smith (D/181). This property was located on the south side of Bell Swamp.

 

The 1800 census shows Lewis as head of a family consisting of 2 males 16-26 years old and 1 female 16-26; he was listed next to Nathan Sellers. In the county court minutes, his name appears on lists of jurors in October, 1805, January, 1806, and July, 1809. On January 29, 1810, the court ordered “that the sheriff summon a jury, to lay off the shortest road that can be made to Bell Swamp, Mill Place or Lewe Sellers and report their proceedings to the next term”.

 

The 1810 census showed him as the head of a family consisting of 2 males 0-10, 1 male 26-45, 2 females 0-10, and 1 female 26-45. Again, be was listed next to Nathaniel Sellers.

 

In 1810, 1811, 1813 and 1814 Lewis served on county juries, according to the court minutes. In the July, 1814, session, he was appointed Justice for Elections for Town Creek, and in October of the same year, overseer of the road from the gap of Pinch Gut to Town Creek Bridge. He was shown as a resident of Bell Swamp in the 1815 tax list. Lewis was again named inspector of elections for Town Creek in the July, 1816 and July, 1818, sessions, and served on the jury in April, 1819.

 

On August 20, 1819, Lewis sold 50 acres, the lower part of a grant to Henry Leonard, to include the Beaverdams and “where Willis now lives”, to Willis Sellers. Witnesses were John Leonard and Richard Harris (J/169). The 1820 census showed Lewis as head of a family composed of 1 male 0-10, 2 males 10-16, 1 male over 45, 2 females 0-10, 1 female 16-26, and 1 female over 45.

 

Lewis was included in jury lists of January, 1820, and April, 1821, and in November, 1821, be entered a grant for 50 acres more on the south side of Bell Swamp. He was appointed to the jury in July, 1822, and on January 28, 1823, a deed of conveyance from Lewis Sellers to Willis Sellers was registered. The January, 1826, session registered a deed of conveyance from Lewis to Joseph Holmes, and he was present as a juror again in December, 1828.

 

In the 1830 census, Lewis was 50-60 years old. Other members of his household were 1 male 15-20, 1 male 20-30, 1 female 10-15, 1 female 15-20, 1 female 20-30, and 1 female 50-60. He was listed two doors from Samuel J. Sellers. By March, 1831, he was deceased and the court appointed Peter L. Sellers as administrator of his estate. On January 18, 1837, a grant for 100 acres on the south side of Bell Swamp, adjoining the Cherry Tree line, was entered for Ann J. Sellers, Lewis’ widow. Philip Cox was a chain carrier for the survey, In 1840, Ann was listed in the family of her son Peter L. Sellers. In the 1850 census, Ann was 75 and living with her son Thomas G. Sellers (b. 1815) and his sister Ellen Sellers (b. 1820).


Records Pertaining to
Willets or Willis Sellers of Town Creek -— Smithville

 

Willets or Willis Sellers of Town Creek and Smithville was born about 1778, according to the 1850 census record. He was a contemporary of Willets Sellers, son of Elisha Sellers, who lived in the Waccamaw and Lockwoods Folly Districts. The assignment of records to each of these individuals in this compilation is based on associations with other people, location and age. Generally, there is little conflict or ambiguity except for some jury listings and, possibly, the 1800 census. In that record, the listing for Willets is thought to refer to Elisha’s son because of its proximity to known residents of the western part of the county,

 

On December 5, 1806, Mary Sellers (wife of Willis Sellers, as will be demonstrated) was deeded 50 acres on the first branch of Mill Creek by her father, Henry Leonard (E/275). The 1810 census shows a Willets Sellers as head of a family consisting of 2 males 0-10, 1 male 26-45, 2 females 0-10, and 1 female 26-45, listed adjacent to Nathaniel Sellers and on the same page as Eldred Sellers, both of who were residents of the Town Creek area.

 

 

Willis Sellers served as a lieutenant in Capt. John Poitevent’s Company of the Brunswick Regiment of N.C. Militia for 11 days in July, 1813. His distance of travel to and from the rendezvous point (Deepwater Point) was 40 miles (War of 1812 Service Records, National Archives). John Poitevent was a neighbor of the Sellers in the Town Creek area. In April, 1814, Willets Sellers, “T.C.” was on the roll of jurors for the county court. In 1815, the tax list showed Willets Sellers to be a resident of Mill Creek, which is a branch of Town Creek. In August and October, 1817, he served on juries.

 

On August 20, 1819, Lowe Sellers sold 50 acres of land to Willis Sellers, the lower part of an original grant to Henry Leonard, to include the Beaverdams and “where Willis now lives” (J/169). In 1820, the census listed a Willis Sellers, 26-45, as head of a family of 2 males 0-10, 1 male 10-16, 2 females 0-10, and 1 female 26-45. He was listed on the same page as Lewe and Eldred Sellers, who resided on Mill Creek and Harris Creek branches of Town Creek.

 

On August 21, 1820, Willis Sellers bought 75 acres on the south side of Harris Swamp from John Portevint, witnessed by John Leonard (probably a brother-in-law; K/15). In October, 1820, Willis Sellers, without the “T.C.” designation, served on the county jury with Nathaniel and Samuel Sellers. On April 29, 1822, the court appointed Willie a patroller for the Town Creek area, and Willets, was on the jury lists of the October, 1822, and October, 1823 court sessions.

 

On December 7, 1824, Willis bought 160 acres on the north side of Town Creek from George Leonard, adjacent to Jacob Leonard. Witnesses were Nathaniel Hewett and David Maryain (K/8)


On April 25, 1825, he bought land on the Smithville Road, about one mile from town, from David Godwin (J/17), and in the November, 1826, session of the county court was appointed overseer of the road from Smithville to Mosquito Creek, in place of John C. Baker. On December 2, 1827, Willis was granted 50 acres on “the main road” adjacent to Isaac Hewett (K/212).

 

Willis, T.C., appeared on the jury list of the August, 1827 session of the court.

 

On December 7, 1829, he sold a tract of land near Smithville to Robert Sellers (J/343), and on December 27, 1832, sold 300 acres on the north side of Town Creek to James Flanagan. Witnesses were James W. Sellers and Mary I. Sellers (L/300). Available records show that he acquired 160 acres in that area; the remaining 140 acres are thus far unaccounted for.

 

Willis was not listed as the head of a family in the 1830 census, In 1840, however, he was listed as 60-70 years old and head of a family consisting of 1 male 20-30 and 1 female 20-30, adjacent to Robert Sellers, in the Smithville District.

 

On January 24, 1843, Willis Sellers, Mary Sellers, Sr., Mary Sellers, Jr., James W. Sellers, and Robert L. Sellers sold their rights in 50 acres of land on the first branch of Mill Creek, near the head, known as the Pine Thicket, originally granted to Henry Leonard, to Ann Sellers. Witnesses were Mary I. Sellers and P.L. Sellers (N/107). This is same parcel of land that was deeded to Mary Sellers and the “heirs of her body” by her father, Henry Leonard, on December 5, 1806 (E/275). Thus, Willis’ wife appears to have been Mary Leonard, daughter of Henry Leonard. Further, we see in an estate division dated May 5, 1814 (G/128) that James and Elizabeth Sellers were named as garndchildren of Martha Leonard. Also named were her daughter, Mary Jane Sellers, and other grand­children John and Rebecca Holmes and Mary, John and Elizabeth Leonard. We also see that Mary Sellers, wife of Willis Sellers, and the heirs of her body received a gift of cattle from her father, Henry Leonard, on August 8, 1802 (D/325).

 

Ann Sellers, to whom the Pine Thicket was deeded by Willis, his wife and children, was the widow of Lewis Sellers, a close neighbor who died prior to 1840.

 

In the 1850 census, Willis Sellers, 72, was living in the household of Robert L. Sellers, in Smithville Township. He did not appear in the 1860 census.

 

We see from the various records cited above that the children of Willis and Mary Jane Sellers included:

 

Male b. 1800-1810

James W. b. l804-1810

Female b. 1800-1810

Female b. 1800-1810

Robert L. b. ca. 1815

Male b. 1810-1820

Female b. 1810-1820


Records Pertaining to Ethelred or Eldred Sellers

 

 

Ethelred Sellers was granted 200 acres on both sides of Harris

Swamp, adjacent to Daniel Sullivan, on May 6, 1799. The survey was accomplished on December 15, 1801. On March 7, 1803, be was granted an additional 200 acres1 again on both sides of Harris Swamp. On February 17, 1806, Ethelred bought 50 acres on the south side of Bell Swamp, adjacent to the “Mill Tract”, from Benjamin Smith (E/198). The latter land was adjacent to or very near Lewis Sellers’ property.

 

Ethelred was not listed in the 1800 census. However, Nathaniel Sellers, who was listed adjacent to Lewis, had three males in his family of the right age for Ethelred that year. Thus, it appears very likely that Ethelred was listed with Nathaniel’s family in 1800, as a male of 16-26 years of age.

 

In 1810, an “E. Sellers” was listed 4 spaces away from “N. Sellers”, who was listed next to “L. Sellers”, as head of a family consisting of 2 males 0-10, 1 male 26-45, 1 female 0-10, 1 female 10-16, and 1 female 26-45.

 

From January, 1810, to October, 1816, Ethelred or Eldred appeared on jury lists for the county court. He served as a private in Capt. John Poitevent’s Company of the Brunswick Regiment, N.C. Militia, for 11 days in July, 1813 (War of 1812 Service Records, National Archives). In January, 1815, he was appointed overseer of the road from Pinch Gut to Town Creek Bridge, taking the place of Lewis Sellers.

 

>From January, 1810, to October, 1816, Ethelred or Eldred appeared on jury lists for the county court. In January, 1815, he was appointed overseer of the road from Pinch Gut to Town Creek Bridge, taking the place of Lewis Sellers.

 

In the 1820 census, he was listed on the same page as Lewis and Willis, as head of a family consisting of 1 male 0-10, 1 male 10-16, 1 male over 45, 2 females 0-10, 1 female 16-26, and 1 female

26-45. He continued to serve on county juries from January, 1820, when he was listed with Nathaniel, to October, 1824.

 

On November 26, 1824, Eldred Sellers and Elizabeth Leonard received a 50-acre plantation known as Howe Hill and two slaves from Edward Sullivan, Eldred to hold the property in trust for Elizabeth (J/113),

 

He again served on the jury in July, 1825, and on December 6, 1827, Ethelred bought land in the fork of Governors Creek and Fishing Creek, adjacent to Jonathan Robbins, from Thomas Haskins (K/311). Five days later, on December 11, 1827, an “Edward” Sellers

-- possibly written in error for Ethelred or Eldred -- sold 100 acres in the same locality to John Drew (K/49). On January 19, 1828, Eldred sold 50 acres on Governors Creek, adjacent to Elizabeth Sullivan and Jonathan Robbins, to William Taylor. Witnesses were Almon L. Sellers and John Leonard (K/260). Almon, probably a son of Eldred, was ordered to work on the road from Governors Creek to Lockwoods Folly by the May, 1827, court.


Eldred appeared on the jury list again in March, 1828, and June, 1829. In the 1830 census, Eldred and Almond Sellers (age 20-30) were listed adjacently. Eldred was the head of a household composed of 1 male 10-15, 1 male 50-60, 1 male 60-70, 1 female 15-20, and 1 female 50-60. Six spaces away was, a Henry S. Sellers, 20-30, probably also a son of Eldred.

 

On December 3, 1832, Eldred sold 50 acres, the upper part of a grant to William Morgan (K/339). The location of this property is not known at present; it may be part of the Governors-Fishing Creek land that Eldred bought in 1827.

 

In December, 1834, the court appointed Almond L. Sellers administrator of the estate of Ethelred. Sellers. In these proceedings, the name of Ethelred’s wife, Penelope, was mentioned.

 

Almond L. Sellers was appointed overseer of the road from near Smithville to Governors Creek in March, 1835, as well as a patroller for the Smithville District. On November 12, 1836, Almond L. Sellers sold 300 acres on the Cape Fear River at the mouth of Marsh Branch, adjoining Quince, Snow, and Sturgeon Branch at its mouth (N/511). No record is presently known of the acquisition of this land, which is just north of the Highway 17 bridge across the river at Wilmington. A second deed, dated the same day, describes the same land and further states that it included “all that tract on which I now live” (0/43). In the 1815 tax list, James Sellers was resident in the Sturgeon Creek — Cape Fear River area.

 

Possible children of Ethelred or Eldred Sellers, as inferred from census and deed records, include:

 

Female b. 1794-1800

Male b. 1800-1810 (Henry S.?)

Almon L. b. 1804-1810

Female b. 1810-1815

Female b. 1810-1820

Male b. 1815-1825


The Sellers Families of Town Creek, Brunswick County

 

 

Census and land records show that Ethelred, Willets, Nathaniel and Lewis Sellers lived in the vicinity of Bell Swamp and Harris Swamp of Town Greek District in the early 1800’s and were close neighbors. The same evidence indicates that their birth dates were such that they could have been brothers (all were born between 1764 and 1780). The 1800 and 1810 census records show the presence of a total of six males of the same age range in Sellers households of the area.

 

In the 1800 census, Lewis Sellers and Nathaniel Sellers were listed as next-door neighbors. Nathaniel was 26-45 with 3 males, 16-26, in his household. Lewis was head of a household with 2 males,

16-26, and 1 female, 16-26. This suggests that a family of six brothers lived in the area.

 

Only one household listed under the name Sellers in the 1790 census had male children of the right number and ages to account for the six individuals described above. That was the household of James Sellers, which in 1790 was composed of 2 males over 16, 5 males under 16, and 3 females. This household was listed near Arthur Robbins, Penelope Sellers’ husband, who was a resident of Mill Creek at that time. There was no listing for a James Sellers among residents of Town Creek in the 1800 census, and there was no older male listed among the six males who were distributed among Lewis’ and Nathaniel’s households. These facts suggest strongly that the six were all sons of James Sellers, who apparently died between 1790 and 1800.

 

In 1800 and 1810, a James Sellers was listed as head of a house­hold but not near known residents of the Town Creek District. Between 1796 and 1810, court and deed records show that a person of that name lived in the Waccamaw area, and was young enough to be assigned road maintenance work in 1805 (see profile on Individuals Named James Sellers). From 1811 through 1815, a James Sellers was recorded as a property owner in the Town Creek District. As there was no further record of the activities of James Sellers of Waccamaw, it appears possible that all of the post-1790 records pertain to only one individual, who moved from the Waccamaw District to Town Creek by

1811.

 

The sale by James Sellers to Arthur Robbins of land on Mill Creek in 1812 (G/69) not only associates this James with the six Sellers males cited above but implies that he had land in the area, for which there is no known record of his acquisition. By the time of the 1815 tax list, a James Sellers owned. land in Town Creek Dist­rict at the mouth of Sturgeon Creek, on the Cape Fear River. At present, no record is known of the acquisition of this land. The 1800 and 1810 census data for James Sellers indicate that he was born about 1765 to 1775, and thus was of the same age range as Lewis and Nathaniel Sellers. The data suggest that he and Nathaniel were the oldest of the group of seven individuals.


A Joseph Sellers was also recorded on the 1815 tax list, as an owner of land on Bell Swamp; therefore, he was a neighbor of Ethelred and Lewis at that time. Joseph was a resident of Town Creek in April, 1810, when he was appointed to work on the road between Orton Mill and. Town Creek by the county court. No further records are known for Joseph in Brunswick County.

 

It is possible that Joseph Sellers was one of the two males, 16-26 years old, in Lewis and Nathaniel’s households in the 1800 census. However, the census of Pike County, Alabama, for 1840 shows a Joseph Sellers, 40-50, and his family located four spaces away from James Sellers, 70-80, and his wife; these listings are among numerous Sellers immigrants from Brunswick County, N.C., and it seems possible that they may represent the same Joseph and James Sellers who were in Town Creek in 1815. If this is true, it appears that Joseph was too young to be one of the males represented in the 1800 list of Sellers in Town Creek. Further, it shows that James and Joseph were the right relative ages to be father and son.

 

The following interpretation is offered for the data cited above. It appears probable that James Sellers, Sr., who was granted land and lived in the Seven Creeks area 1778-1783, was the sire of Nathaniel, Lewis, Ethelred, and Willets Sellers of Town Creek; two other males, born 1774-1784; and James Se1lers who was listed as "Jr." on a 1779 grant. James, Sr., moved to the Kill Creek area of Town Creek District by 1790, where he was a neighbor of Arthur Robbins, Penelope Sellers’ husband, taking with him six sons. James, Jr., remained in the Seven Creeks area, living on land given him by James, Sr. Lewis and Ethelred were granted land on Bell Swamp (1798) and Harris Swamp (1799), respectively. By 1800, James, Sr., was dead. James, Jr., lived in the vicinity of the Waccamaw until about 1811, when he moved to the Town Creek district. He sold land on Mill Creek, presumably acquired by James, Sr., in 1812; and by 1815 was resident in the Sturgeon Creek area. Sometime between 1815 and 1820, James, Jr., emigrated to Alabama with his family.

 

In 1836, Almond L. Sellers, a son of Ethelred, sold 300 acres at the mouth of Sturgeon Creek on the Cape Fear River (N/511), two years after his father’s death. There is no known record of Ethelred’s or Almond’s acquiring this property. It appears, however, to be the same property on which James Sellers paid taxes in 1815. Neither is there a record of James’ acquisition of this land. It seems probable that the land was originally the property of James, Sr.; was occupied by James, Jr.; and later devolved to Ethelred.

 

At the present time, the only known record of an early acquisition of land on Mill Creek by a Sellers was Simon Sellers’ 1785 purchase of 640 acres there (B/261); although the record snows that 320 acres of this property were subsequently sold (C/30), the other 320 acres are presently unaccounted for. Possibly, that land was passed on to heirs of Simon. However, Simon’s line of descent is generally well understood and there is no indication that James was among his heirs (nor is there for Ethelred, Lewis, Nathaniel, or Willets). More diligent searching of property records may clarify this matter.


It appears that Willets of Town Creek, one of the possible siblings discussed above, was about five years older than Willets Sellers of the Waccmaw and Lockwoods Folly Districts. The latter person, who is known to have been a son of Elisha Sellers, was probably named for his mother, Mary Willets. As Willets of Town Creek was named (presumably) some five years earlier than Willets, son of Elisha, it appears that more than one connection must have existed between the Willets and Sellers families in the 1770’s.

 

The fact that Willets Sellers of Town Creek was married to Mary Jane Leonard, daughter of Henry and Martha Leonard, is well documented. The record also suggests that Lewis Sellers may have married a Leonard heir, though this is by no means conclusive. In 1819, Lewis sold a parcel of land described as being part of an original grant to Henry Leonard, to Willis Sellers (J/l69). No record of Lewis’ acquisition of this land is presently known; possibly, it was acquired through marriage to a Leonard daughter. This suggestion is strengthened somewhat by statements in Deed N/107, dated January 24, 1843, in which Ann Sellers, the widow of Lewis, bought inherited shares of Henry Leonard’s former land from Willis Sellers, his wife, and his children. There is no evidence that Ann was a co-heir of this land, however.

 

It appears that Ethelred (Eldred) Sellers also had a close relationship with the Leonard family, as we see from Deed J/1l3, dated November 26, 1824, by which Eldred was made trustee for property to be held for Elizabeth Leonard. Elizabeth Leonard was identified as a granddaughter of Henry Leonard in an estate division dated May 5, 1814 (G/128). The fact that she was deeded land in trust by Edward Sullivan suggests that her mother may have been Edward Sullivan’s daughter, who was named in Deed J/114 as Elizabeth Sullivan. Individuals with the surname Sullivan were neighbors of Willets and Ethelred Sellers.

 

Other grandchildren of Henry and Martha Leonard were John and Rebecca Holmes (G/128). Individuals named Holmes were also close neighbors of the Sellers in the area (J/171).

 

Dates, ages and associations cited above indicate that James Sellers, Sr., of early deed records and who had six males other than himself in his household of 1790, may have been the father of:

 

James Sellers, Jr.  b. 1760-70

Nathaniel Sellers   b. 1765-70

Lewis Sellers  b. 1774-75

Ethelred Sellers b. 1774-75

Willis Sellers  b. ca. 1778

Male     b. 1774-84

Male  b. 1774-84


The Family of Amelia Sellers (Wife of Joel?) in Columbus County

 

 

Court minutes and census and deed records for Columbus County show that heads of families named Elisha, Matthew and Joel Sellers lived along Gum Swamp and Beaverdam Swamp, tributaries on the west side of the Waccamaw, in the early 1800’s. These records suggest that all three were sons of Amelia or Milly Sellers. It appears obvious from the given names of these men that they were related to the six known Sons of Benjamin Sellers who immigrated to Brunswick County from Edgecombe County. No definite information as to who their parents were, however, has yet been found.

 

Elisha (referred to as Elisha II in this compilation) was born about 1785, according to the 1850 census. On June 27, 1807, he sold land in the fork of Beaver Dam Swamp and Great Pond Branch to John Carlile, with Joel Sellers acting as a witness (A/49). As this was one year prior to the formation of Columbus County, both individuals were listed as residents of Bladen County. On March 22, 1810, Sion Sellers of Horry District in South Carolina also sold land to John Carlile in the same general area (the deed refers to the Brunswick­-Bladen County border, then nonexistent; Columbus County being formed from the border region). Both Joel and Elisha Sellers witnessed this Columbus County deed (A/48). These two deeds indicate not only that Joel and Elisha were associated with Sion, but that both Elisha II and Sion owned land in the same area, for which there is no record of acquisition by either man.

 

An association is demonstrated between Elisha II, Matthew, and Joel Sellers in Deeds B/l66 and B/165, dated October 21, 1812, and April 30, 1813, respectively, in which the first two men were witnesses for purchases by the third. Also, there was an association with the family of Benjamin Sellers, who lived in adjacent Horry County, S.C.  Elisha acted as a witness to a purchase of land on the state line in Columbus County by Benjamin on October 18, 1814, along with Jordan Sellers, Benjamin’s son (B/60).

 

Amelia Sellers owned land adjacent to Joel and Elisha on Beaver Dam Swamp (deeds dated March 7, 1820 and April 3, 1820). In the 1820 census of Columbus County, Amealia Sellers, over 45, is listed alone on the same page as Elisha, who was listed as head of a family consist­ing of two males 0-10, 1 male 26-45, 2 females 0-10, and 1 female 26-45. Matthew Sellers was listed on a separate page as head of a family consisitng of 1 male 26-45, 2 males 0-10, 1 female 0-10, and 1 female 26-45. Joel Sellers, also on a separate page, was shown as head of a household consisitng of 2 males 0-10, 1 male 10-16, 1 male over 45, 2 females 10-16, 2 females 16-26, end 1 female over 45.

 

In 1810, “A. Sellors” was shown as head of a household composed of 1 male 16-26, 1 male 26-45, 1 female 10-16, and 1 female 16-26. As in all the other listings made along the Waccamaw by that particular census enumerator, the age of the head of the household was not given. Three pages away, a “J. Sellors” was listed as head of a household consisting of 1 male 0-10, 1 female 0-10, and 1 female

16-26. Presumably, “A. Sellors” is Amelia. The two males in her


household and the unlisted “J. Sellors” probably represent Elisha II, Matthew, and Joel. Ages for the two listed males are compatible with ages given in later censuses for Matthew and Elisha II.

 

In 1830, the census for Columbus County showed only Joel, Matthew and Elisha as heads of households. Joel’s household, how­ever, contained a 70- to 80-year old female, who could have been Amelia. This person did not appear in the 1840 census record!

 

Elisha, Matthew and Joel Sellers were included in Columbus County jury lists from the time of the earliest surviving records (1819). The same records show that Elisha owned 500 acres of land on the north side of Beaver Dam Swamp, and Matthew had 600 acres on Gum Swamp, a few miles to the south. Elisha’s land was adjacent to the land of Hilly Sellers (Nov. 1819 — May 1820). Both Matthew and Elisha periodically lost land to the sheriff for unpaid taxes. Elisha was elected a Justice of the Peace in February, 1820, and presided over the court in February, 1822 and February, 1823.

 

Joel Sellers also owned land on Beaverdam Swamp. Although only two purchases are known, totalling 150 acres (B/165 and B/166), Joel sold 100 acres there to Elisha on August 26, 1821 (no ref. no.) and deeded at least 250 acres in the same area to his sons Amos and Daniel on February 13, 1842 (G/195).

 

In the 1800 census, a Milliford Sellers is listed as head of a household in Bladen County containing 1 male 10-16, 2 males 16-26, 2 females 0-10, and 1 female 26-45. This may be “Milly” or Amelia of later Columbus County records, as the numbers and ages of all the individuals in the household match those cited above for the 1810 and 1820 records. Land records of Amelia’s supposed children show that their properties would have been in Bladen County in 1800, becoming part of Columbus County when it was formed in 1808. If this 1800 listing did represent Amelia, it appears from the age of her youngest children (a daughter born 1794-1800 and another born 1790-1800) that she may have remarried after Joel’s death (discussed later in this profile). Amelia herself seems to have been born about 1755-1760, according to census data.

 

Land records of the original six male Sellers immigrants to Brunswick County from Edgecombe County do not show that any of them owned land on Beaverdam Swamp west of the Waccamaw. There are, how­ever, general references to land “on the west side of the White Marsh”; and Matthew acquired land “on the southwest branch of the Waccamaw below the White Marsh” through his wife, Ann Corbett, in 1773 (23/480). Only Simon owned land in Gum Swamp.

 

It appears at least plausible that Joel, son of Benjamin, was Amelia’s husband and the father of Matthew, Elisha II and Joel of Columbus County in the 1820’s and later. Joel last appeared on the Brunswick County records in 1779. Available evidence suggests that he may have moved to Bladen County after that. Matthew, son of Benjamin, sold 400 acres of land on White Marsh to his brother Joel on January 19, 1772 (A/149). There is no record of Joel’s selling this land, so it may possibly be the Beaverdam Swamp land of the sales by Elisha II, Joel the younger, and Sion Sellers.


The argument has been presented in the profile on Joel the elder that Sion Sellers, who evidently was raised by Benjamin Sellers of Horry County, was a son of Joel. The fact that Joel the younger and Elisha II witnessed a deed for Sion, selling land near their own property (A/48), suggests that they may indeed have been brothers or at least co-heirs. The fact that Sion had a son named Joel lends further support to the idea that Joel, son of Benjamin, may have been their father. Further, a Brunswick County deed of October 13, 1800, shows that Sion Sellers of South Carolina sold 100 acres on Seven Creeks on that date to Elias Duncan. Jordan and Benjamin Sellers were witnesses (D/247). There is no known record of Sion’s acquiring this property. Neither is there any indication that Benjamin owned land in the Seven Creeks area. Joel, however, did, receiving a grant of 100 acres there on December 21, 1779. This possible association of Joel the elder and Sion suggests that Sion may have been an heir of Joel.

 

Neither Joel nor Amelia were listed as head of a household in the 1790 census. However, there is a listing for William Sellers, with a household consisting of 1 male over 16, 3 males less than 16, and 4 females. This may represent Joel’s widow and children, with William (possibly a son of Elisha I) as head of the household. The presence of Jordan Sellers next door supports this possibility, as the deeds cited above show that Benjamin’s children associated with the supposed children of Amelia through subsequent decades. Thus, it seems possible that Joel had died prior to 1790 and either his widow had remarried or a relative was looking after the household. If the first possibility is true, then evidently the marriage was not a permanent one, as Milleford Sellers was listed alone in 1800 and there was no listing for William Sellers as head of a household that year. The presence of two female children, born l790-l794 and 1794-1800, in Amelia’s (Milleford’s) household in 1800 and 1810 suggests that she did remarry after Joel’s death.

 

 

 

The families of Matthew, Joel and Elisha Sellers of Columbus County, as constructed from census records, included:

a)   Matthew Sellers b. 1780-84; m.       b. 1790-94

Male b. 1810-20

Male b. 1815-20

Female b. 1815-20

Male b. 1820-25

Male b. 1820-25

Female b. 1820-25

Male b. 1825-30

Female b. 1825-30

 

Matthew did not appear in the census records of Colum-

­bus County after 1830.


b)  Elisha Sellers b. ca 1785, d. 185-; m. Rebecca            b. ca. 1795, d. 185-.

Male b. 1810-15

Male b. 1810-15

Female b. 1810-20, d. before 1830

Female b. 1815-20

Amos b. ca, 1823, m. Sabra A. ____, b. ca. 1826

Fema1e b. 1820-25

Elisha W. b. ca. 1825, m. Moley A.       , b. ca. 1823

Female b. 1825-30

Joel C. b. ca. 1830

William W. b. ca. 1835

Female b. 1835-40

Rebecca b. ca. 1839

Pelman E. b. ca. 1841

 

Elisha and Rebecca appeared in the Columbus County census

records through 1850.

 

c)  Joel Sellers b. ca. 1787, d. 185-; m. (1)       , b. 1784-90, d. 183-; (2)Rebecca       , b. ca. 1810

Male b. 1804-10

Female b. 1804-10

Male b. 1810-20

Male b. 1810-20

Male b. 1825-30

Male b. 1830-35

Female b. 1835-40

G.W. b. ca. 1839

Alva b. ca. 1840

James C. b. ca. 1846


Records Pertaining to Sion Sellers of Horry County, S.C.

 

 

Sion Sellers was born about 1775, according to the 1850 census record of Horry County. The relations of this person to other Sellers in the area are not known. Evidence indicates that there was an association between Sion and the known family of Benjamin Sellers of Horry County. However, associations between Sion and the probable children of Joel Sellers, Sr., of Columbus County, as well as property associations, suggest that Sion was an heir of Joel.

 

Brunswick County deed records show that Sion Sellers of South Carolina sold 100 acres on Seven Creeks on October 13, 1800 (D/247). This may have been the 100 acres granted to Joel Sellers in the same area in December, 1779; if so, Sion appears to have been Joel’s heir and possibly his son.

 

Sion Sellers was given property on the Little Pee Dee River in Horry County, on which he then lived, by his father-in-law John James in 1809 (B/394). In the 1810 census of Horry County, Sion was listed as head of a household two pages away from Ben­jamin Sellers, who then lived in the Iron Springs area. The household consisted of 1 male 26-45, 2 males 0-10, 1 female 26-45, and 3 females 0-10.

 

Columbus County deed records show that Sion Sellers of the Horry District in South Carolina sold land on the north side of the dividing line between Bladen and Brunswick Counties to John Carlile, on March 22, 1810. Witnesses were Joel Sellers and Elisha Sellers (A/48). As Columbus County had been formed in the area two years earlier, the Bladen-Brunswick boundary line no longer existed. However, information in a deed from Elisha Sellers to John Carlile, dated three years earlier (A/49), indicates that this property was on Beaver Dam Swamp. Elisha and Joel Sellers of this and other deeds in Columbus County appear to have been brothers and, probably, sons of Amelia Sellers. Possibly, they were also sons of Joel Sellers the elder, one of the six sons of Benjamin Sellers of Edgecombe County. Possible relationships among Amelia’s family are discussed in a separate profile.

 

The fact that Sion was associated with the possible sons of Joel and that he owned property in their vicinity, though he him­self lived in Horry County, suggests a close relation among these people. The possibility that all of these individuals were sons of Joel is strengthened by the documentary evidence suggesting that Sion inherited Joel’s land on Seven Creeks.

 

On November 2, 1811, Sion bought 450 acres on Chinner’s Swamp at the Little Pee Dee River in Horry County (B/393).

 

In the 1820 census of Horry County, Sion Sellers was listed as the head of a household consisting of 1 male over 45, 1 male 18-26, 1 male 10-16, 1 male 0-10, 1 female 26-45, 1 female 16-26, 2 females 10-16, and 3 females 0-10. This entry was 7 and 9 list­ings away from those of Jordan and Wright Sellers, respectively.


Both of the latter were sons of Benjamin Sellers of Horry County.

On June 5, 1827, Sion bought 90 acres from Wi1lis James (B/396).

This land was located on the south side of Chinners Swamp.

 

In the 1830 census, Sion was head of a household in Horry County consisting of 1 male 50-60, 1 male 20-30, 1 male 10-15, 1 male 5-10, 1 female 60-70, 2 females 20-30, 1 female 15-20, and 1 female 10-15.

 

In 1840, the census listed Sion as head of a household con­sisting of 1 male 60-70, 1 male 20-30, 1 male 15-20, 1 female 50-60, 2 females 30-40, 1 female 20-30, and 1 female 0-5.

 

On April 23, 1844, Sion made a deed of gift to his grandson Sion Sellers, son of John Sellers. The gift consisted of several cattle. Joel C. Sellers was a witness (L/299). On December 19, l845, Sion sold 400 acres on the east side of the Little Pee Dee to John D. Jordan. John Sellers was a witness (L/212). This was probably the land deeded to Sion by his father-in-law in 1809 (B/394). Sion purchased 73 acres, “part of Newton’s grant”, from John Skipper on July 31, l846 (B/395). Information from other deeds shows that this was on the south side of Chinners Swamp.

 

In the 1850 census, Sion Sellers, 75, was head of a house­hold containing Lukey, 70, Edney, 40, Joannah, 5, James, 2, and Francis, 15. Adjacent to Sion on each side were the households of Joel Sellers, 27, and John Sellers, 30. Seven entries away was the listing for Levin J. Sellers, 40. The latter three men are accountable in earlier census records of Sion’s household and all appear to have been Sion’s sons.

 

Sion was not listed in the 1860 census. His wife Lucretia (“Lukey” of 1850), 83, was present in the household of their son Joel Sellers.

 

One of Sion’s daughters appears to have been named Patience

E. Sellers, according to Horry Deeds N/764 and N/660, and was probably the “Edney”, 40, of Sion’s 1850 household and the “P. Edney”, 64, in the household of James M. Sellers, 22, of 1870.

 

Sion and his wife Lucretia James Sellers appear to have had the following children:

Male b. 1802

Female b. 1804

Patience Edney b. 1806

Female b. 1808

Levin 3. Sellers b. 1810, d. 187-; m. Mary

Female b. 1812

Female b. 1814

Female b. 1816-18

John A. Sellers b. 1820, d. 186-; m. Anity

Joel C. Sellers b. 1823, d. 186-; m. Elisa*

 

*Joel’s wife is listed variously as Elisa, Elviney, and Emma in the censuses for 1850, 1860, and 1870, respectively.


Summary -- Descendants of Benjamin Sellers of

 

Edgecombe County, N.C., and Their Dispersion

 

 

 

In the 1770’s, the seven known children of Benjamin Sellers Matthew, Benjamin, Elisha, Joel, Jechonias, Simon, and Mary Penelope — lived along the Waccamaw River and its tributaries, between present-day Whiteville, N.C., and the South Carolina border. Mother male, James Sellers, was a contemp­orary and close associate. Possibly, he was a seventh brother or other close relative. Fran Laaker* suggests that Matthew, prob­able brother of Benjamin of Edgecombe County, may have accompanied the younger people on their move to the area and that James may have been his son.

 

By the turn of the century, the families of these eight individuals had moved to other localities, establishing a pattern that persists to some extent today.

 

Matthew moved to Livingston County, Kentucky. His descendants spread southward into Louisiana and points west.

 

Benjamin moved across the South Carolina line into northwestern Horry County, returning to Brunswick County only shortly before his death. His descendants continued to live in Horry and Marion Counties, S.C., as late as 1860. Some of them appear to have moved to Alabama near other Sellers emigrants from Brunswick County, who had settled in the vicinity of Pike County.

 

Elisha spent his life in Brunswick County, apparently living in the Shallotte or western Lockwoods Folly district in his later years. Two of his sons, Samuel and Matthew, moved to Pike County, Alabama, about 1834, establishing a Sellers colony of significant size there, from whence descendants spread westward. His son Willets and family lived in the Shallotte District. His son Thomas and at least some children lived in the Royal Oak and Middle Swamp areas of Lockwoods Folly and Town Creek Districts.

 

Joel does not appear on records later than 1779 and his fate is not known. Indirect evidence, however, suggests that be lived on the west side of the Waccamaw River in what is now Columbus County. His possible children lived in that area as late as 1850. Thus far, no evidence has been found supporting the story that Joel moved to Charleston, S.C., although further research in the South Carolina records may well do so.


Jechonias did not marry or acquire property. He died while resid­ing in the household of his brother-in-law Arthur Robbins, in the Mill Creek area of Brunswick County.

 

 

Simon lived on the west bank of the Cape Fear River and owned property in Brunswick Town and the vicinity until 1793, when he moved across the river into New Hanover County. His descendants lived along the east side of the river and in the vicinity of Smithville (now Southport) as late as 1870.

 

Mary Penelope Robbins lived near Mill Creek and Bell Swamp in the Town Creek District. Her children seem to have lived in several areas of the county, includin the Waccamaw, Lockwoods Folly, Town Creek, and Northwest Districts by 1840.

 

James appears to have moved to the vicinity of Mill Creek. He also probably owned land on Sturgeon Creek at the Cape Fear River. His possible sons lived near one another in the vicinity of Mill Creek, Bell Swamp and Harris Swamp by 1820. Children of at least two of these possible sons (James and Ethelred) moved to Pike County, Alabama, by l840.

 

 

For references to supporting documentation for this summary, see the profiles on these individuals and their families or possible families.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Mrs. Ray C. Laaker, 2295 Rachael Avenue, San Diego, Calif. 92139


Records Pertaining to Abraham Sellers

 

 

Evidence from available records suggests tint Abraham or Abram Sellers, who lived in the Northwest District of Brunswick County during the period 1806-1832, bad origins among the Sellers of Sampson County. Abraham and some of his probably close relations are discussed here in order to account for them and thus to facilitate a better understanding of the descendants of Benjamin Sellers of Edgecombe County.

 

Abraham Sellers was born about 1760-65, according to census records. No listing for that name appeared in the 1800 census of Brunswick County; however, an Abraham Sellers was listed in Sampson County as head of a household consisting of 1 male 26-45, 1 male 10-16, 2 males 0-10, 1 female 26-45, 2 females 0-10, and 2 slaves. This listing was one page away from another individual of the same name but 15 to 20 years younger.

 

Six years later in Brunswick County, Abram and Sarah Sellers, together with Shadrick Register, were parties in a deed to Absalom Robbins for a negro boy on September 13, 1806 (E/296). Register and Robbins were neighbors in the Hood Creek area. The deed suggests that Sarah Sellers and Shadrick Register were co-owners of a slave, and therefore that they may have been co-heirs. Abram’s wife therefore may have been Sarah Register.

 

In 1807, 1808, and 1809 Abram Sellers served on juries in Brunswick County. The 1810 census listed an A. Sellers as the head of a household composed of 2 males 0-10, 2 males 10-16, 2 males 16-26, 1 male over 45, 1 female 16-26, 1 female over 45, and 2 slaves. The 1815 tax list showed Abram as resident in the Cape Fear River area of the Northwest District. Abraham Sellers was listed among the members of the Mill Creek Baptist Church in 1818. In August, 1818, however, he was threatened with excommun­ication and finally he was expelled from the congregation in February, 1820.

 

In 1820, the census included him in a household of 1 male 0-10, 2 males 10-16, 2 males 18-26, 1 male over 45, and 1 female over 45. He was listed 3 spaces away from Anguish Sellers. In April, 1822, Abram was listed among jurors for the next session, but In July of the same year swore before the court that he was not a freeholder, apparently in an effort to avoid jury duty. Again in April, l824, he was named on the jury list but did not appear for duty the following session. In July, 1825, he was excused from serving on juries in the future.

 

In the 1830 census, Abram was listed as the head of a household consisting of 1 male 15-20, 1 male 20-30, 1 male 60-70, and 1 female 60-70.

 

In the June, 1832, session of the county court, administration of the estate of Abraham Sellers, deceased, was granted to William H. Sellers. Guardianship of the minor heirs of Abraham was assigned to Joseph Watters, Robert Gibbs, and Thomas Hall. The inventory


of Abraham’s estate was returned by William Sellers in the December, 1832, session.

 

William H. Sellers was listed in the 1850 census as resident in the Northwest District of Brunswick County, and 52 years of age; with Tabitha Sellers, 24, and Catherine Haddoc, 70, in his household. Adjacent was John M. Sellers, 28, and Maria Sellers, 30. In the 1860 census, William H. Sellers is shown as being 70 years of age. William may have been a son of Abraham. The dis­parities among ages listed in the 1830-1860 census records, however, make it difficult to determine whether this was true.

 

On February 29, l840, a Samuel Sellers sold the land on Hood Creek that Absalom Robbins had bought from Shadrick Register in 1806 (M/222). As there is evidence that Abraham Sellers was an heir to Shadrick Register’s property, it appears that Samuel may have obtained this land through marriage to a daughter of Absalom Robbins. Samuel Sellers was born about 1803, according to census records; thus, he could have been a son of Abraham. Samuel sold the property to an Edwin L. Sellers, of New Hanover County. Edwin was born about 1790-1800, and therefore could also have been a son of Abraham. This idea is supported by the fact that William H. and Edwin Sellers were co-purchasers of land on Alligator Creek. Edwin sold his share of this property to William H. on January 1, 1838 (M/345).

 

There appears to have been an association between Abraham Sellers of Brunswick County and Angus (sometimes spelled "Anguish") Sellers, as, in the 1820 census, they were listed 3 lines apart. In the minutes of the Brunswick County court of October 27, 1823, Angus M. Sellers posted security for the administration of the estate of Malcom Matthew. Otherwise, there are no records of Angus’ activities in the county. In 1830 Angus, 40-50, was listed as head of a household containing 7 children in New Hanover County. The 1840 and 1850 records of New Hanover County indicate that Angus died in the 1840’s and had several children who were grown but still unmarried by 1850. The relationship of Abraham to Angus, if any, is not known at this time. The age relationships, however, were such that Angus could have been Abraham’s son.

 

John Sellers of Northwest District, described in the court minutes as John Sellers, NW (Dec. 3, 1832) may also have been related in some way to Abraham. Although there is no evidence other than proximity to support this idea, John’s birth date (1790-1800) as shown in the 1830 census, where be was listed a page away from Abraham, was right for him to have been the male listed in Abraham’s household in 1810 who did not appear in either the 1800 or the 1820 listing.

 

The other Abraham Sellers who was listed in Sampson County in 1800 continued to reside there and the 1840 and subsequent census records of that county provide Information on his probable children and grandchildren. This individual was born about 1780; therefore, he could have been a son of the Abraham who died in Brunswick County in 1832.


In l840, this Abraham was listed in Sampson County, as head of a household containing 2 males 5-10, 1 male 10-15, 1 male 30-40, 1 male 60-70, 2 females 0-5, 2 females 5-10, and 1 female 40-50. He was listed 4 spaces away from Nich Sellers, who was head of a household consisting of 1 male 5-10, 1 male 10-15, 1 male 20-30, 1 female 0-5, 1 female 5-10, 1 female 10-15, and 1 female 30-40.

 

In the 1850 census of Sampson County, Abram, 70, was head of a household with Margaret, 35, Mary, 5, and Julian, 3, next to the household of Darkis Sellers (female), 45, with Amanda, 20, Eliza, 18, Hubert, 16, Susan, 22, and Triscilla, 10. A family of Lawrences, headed by the mother, Catherine, 35, was also listed in the household. Fifteen households away was Abram Sellers, Jr., 50, with Jemima, 50, Everitt, 23, Davis, 20, Amos, 18, Mary, 16, Mariah, 14, and Lewis, 12.

 

In the 1860 census of Sampson County members of the above family groups were represented in the household of Margaret Sellers, 40, with Mary J., 19, Julia A., 14, and Elizabeth, 10; and the household of Dorcas Sellers, 50, with Eliza, 28, Priscilla, 26, and Susan, 24. The two households were numbered 118 and 149, respectively, in the Taylors Bridge District of the Southern Division of the county.

 

Based on all of the above data, probable children of Abraham Sellers of Brunswick County (1760-65 --1832) and his wife Sarah (1760-65-- ?) included:

 

Abraham (?) b. ca. 1780

Male (Angus?) b. 1784-90

Male (Edwin?) b. 1794-l800

Male (William H.?) b. 1794-1800

Female b. 1790-94

Male (Samuel?) b. 1804-10

Male b. l804-10 (minor in June, 1832)

Male b. 1810-15 (minor in June, 1832)

Female b. 1790-1800, d. before 1810

 

No listing for Abraham Sellers occurs in the 1790 census. In Sampson County, four individuals named Sellers were listed as heads of households. Of those, only Jacob Sellers had males in his household of the right age range to be Abraham. Until further information shows otherwise, it appears probable that Abraham was a son of Jacob Sellers, whose presence in Sampson and Duplin Counties can be demonstrated as early as 1783.


Records Pertaining to William H. Sellers of Northwest District

 

 

According to census records, this individual was born about 1790. The earliest record known to pertain to him is dated 1815, when William Sellers was listed as a landowner in the Northwest District of the county on the tax list of that year.

 

On the 1820 census record, William Sellers was shown as head of a household consisting of 1 male 26-45, 1 male 0-10, 3 females 0-10, and 1 female 26—45. He was listed on the same page as Letitia Sellers, the widow of Benjamin and a resident of the Northwest District. He was appointed to jury duty in July, 1820, but was excused from duty during the following session due to indisposition. His cattle earmark was registered in the same session.

 

In the October, 1822, session of court, 50 acres of land on Hood Creek belonging to William Sellers was ordered to be sold for taxes by the sheriff. There is no known record of William’s acquisition of this land. However, Absalom Robbins acquired land on Hood Creek in 1812 (F/165 and G/119), and it appears from sub­sequent deeds that Abraham, William’s probable father, was related to Absalom Robbins. Therefore, the land may have passed to William from Absalom Robbins.

 

William Sellers served on juries in the January, l824, and May, 1827, sessions of court. On November 15, 1830, William Sellers bought 66 acres adjoining James Mills’ corner from F. N. Waddell. Thomas A. Hall was a witness (K/210).

 

William H. Sellers was appointed as the administrator of the estate of Abraham Sellers, deceased, by the June, 1832, session of the county court. He served on the juries of the September, 1832, and March, 1838, sessions.

 

In the 1840 census William Sellers was recorded as head of a household consisting of 1 male 50-60, 1 male 15-20, 1 male 20-30, and 1 female 20-30. William Sellers served on juries in March, 1841, and September, 1845.

 

In 1850 the census listed William Sellers, 52, as head of a household containing Tebitha Sellers, 24, and Catherine Haddoc, 70, in the Northwest District. Adjacent was the household of John M. Sellers, 28, and Maria Sellers, 30.

 

In 1860, William H. Sellers, 70, and Mary Sellers, 71, were listed as a household adjacent to the household of John M. Sellers, 30, and Ann M. Sellers, 40, in Northwest District. John M. Sellers was probably William’s son, as represented in the l840 census.

 

 

In the March, 1867, court, Richard L. Sellers was appointed administrator of the estate of William Sellers, deceased.



Index

 

More than one entry may be found for a given name on each page number listed. Numbers in parentheses () indicate that more than one individual with the same name is mentioned on the page.

 

 

Addison, Christopher 64            Braswell, Jesse 7

All Saints Parish 20               Braswell, John 8

Alligator Creek 86                 Braswell, William 8

Alligator Swamp 60, 61, 62         Brunswick Regiment, N.C.

Arnold, Frederick 46, 49, 52(2),   Militia 33, 39, 42, 47, 70, 72

 53, 55, 58(2)                     Brunswick Town 27, 29, 30, 31, 84

Arnold, Sarah 46, 55               Bryant, ____ 13, 21, 22

Asbury, Bishop Francis 20          Bryant, Christian 21, 22

Bacon’s Rebellion 2                Bryant, Ezekiel 25

Baker, Abram 17, 30, 48            Bryant, Mary 24

Baker, Isaac 30                    Burney, John 57

Baker, John C. 30                  Bygrave, Robert 7

Baker, Mary 30                     Cains, Elizabeth 30

Baker, Winney Sellers 14, 30       Cains, Jacob 62

Bassford, Christopher 35           Campbell, John 5

Bassford, John 62                  Cape Fear River 16, 17, 21, 29,

Bassford, William 62               30, 55, 67, 73, 74, 75, 84, 85

Bear Branch 43, 46                 Carlile, John 77, 81

Beaver Dams, the 29, 53, 69, 70    Carter, Kindred 10, 25

Beaverdam Swamp (Creek) 20, 21,    Cason, Joel 49

 29, 77, 78, 81                    Cason, John 62

Begford, John 69                   Caw Caw Swamp 35, 41, 43, 46, 47,

Bell, Robert 16                    48, 55

Bell Swamp 46, 51, 52, 53, 54,     Cedar Branch 57

 69, 72, 74, 75, 84                Cellers, Archabel 17, 18

Bennett, Arthur 60, 61             Cherry Tree Branch 46, 48, 52,

Bennett, Jesse 43                  54, 69

Bennett, Joel 61                   (Chinner’s Swamp 81, 82

Big Crow Swamp 36                  Chowan River 3

Biggs 57                           Clay Branch 61

Black River 1                      Clemmons, Louise 50

Blackburn, John 4                  Clemmons, Robert 48

Blackwater River 2, 3, 5           Clewes, John 40

Blaney, Benjamin 43                Clewis, Samuel 35

Blaney, Brey 61                    Cobb, Benjamin 8

Blaney, Nancy 43                   Cobb Family 8

Blenning Creek 21                  Cobb, John 3

Blenon Landing 21                  Colson, John 4

Boazman, Archibald 60              Co. G., 2nd N.C. Artillery 56, 57

Boazman, Ethelred 34, 60, 61       Co. G, 20th N.C. Infantry 58

Boazman, Ethelred Jr. 61           Corbett, Ann 13, 17, 18, 78

Boazman, Mary 33, 60               Corbett (Corbitt), James 15, 29,

Boazman, Nancy 34, 60              38

Boon, Joseph 4, 5                  Coreroy Swamp 7, 8

Boon, Thomas 7                     Cotton, John 3

Boone Neck 31                      Cow Branch 36

Boone’s Landing 49                 Cox, Alexander 53, 54, 56, 58, 59


Cox, Amanda 58                     Gilbert, William 30

Cox, Philip 69                     Gloucester Co., Va. 11

Crews, Samuel 65                   Godwin, David 71

Cromartie, Elizabeth 23            Gore, Wiil1iam 64

Crumpton, Henery 8                 Governors Creek 72, 73

Cypress Circuit, S.C. 23           Graham, Elizabeth 23

Cypress Creek 2                    Great Branch of Seven Creeks 64

Davidson County, Tenn. 17          Great Creek 4

Deepwater Point 42, 47, 70         Great Pond Branch 77

Dixon, Thomas 10, 15               Green Sea, S.C. 20

Dortch, William 10                 Green Swamp 61

Double Branch 21                   Grissett, Capt. 33, 34, 39

Drew, John 4, 5, 60, 72            Grissett, Reuben 16

Dry, Col. 15                       Grissett Swamp 29

Drysdale, Gov. Hugh 3              Grissett, William 65

Duncan,       23                   Grissom, Effie 30

Duncan, Elias 79                   Grissom, James 30

Duncan, Ezekiel 23                 Gum Swamp 38, 77, 78

Duncan, Mary 64                    Gurley, George Jr. 7

Dutchman’s Creek 43                Gurley, George Sr. 7

Ellis, Daniel 31                   Gutteridge, John 3

Ellis, James 31                    Haddoc, Catherine 86, 88

Ellis, Nathan 31                   Hall, John(’s Place) 40, 45

Ellis Family 32                    Hall, Thomas 85

Elmira, N.Y., prisoner-of-war      Hall, Thomas A. 88

 camp 56, 57, 58                   Hanchey, Elizabeth 22

Emperial Branch 43                 Hankins, Thomas 72

Emporer Branch 43                  Hanley, Michael 5

Ethelred, Isaac 65                 Harris, Drewry 27

Fall Swamp 46, 49, 53, 54, 55      Harris, Richard 69

Faulk, James 22,23                 Harris Swamp (Creek) 70, 72, 74,

Federal Point 29                   75, 84

Fishing Creek 72, 73               Harrison, Josiah 2

Flanagan, James 71                 Henderson, John 31

Flin, John 29                      Hewett, Nathaniel 70

Flowers, Ann(a) 54, 57             Hewett, Sarah 41

Flowers, Bennet 51, 54, 57         Hewitt, Benjamin 61

Flowers, Henry 54                  Hewitt, Elias 62

Flowers, Joseph 51, 57             Hewitt, Isaac 62, 71

Foremen, Benjamin Sr. 4, 5         Hewitt, Moses 61, 62, 63

Ft. Caswell 56                     Hewitt, Philip 41

Ft. Fisher, Battle of 56, 57 58    Hewitt, Reuben 62

Ft. Johnson 17                     Hickman, Ann 47

Fowler, Dennis 27                  Hickman, Thomas 65

Franklin, Va. 3                    Higgason, John 11

Frink, Samuel 36                   Hill, Benjamin 5, 7

Fulgham, Anthony 2                  Hill, John l6

Galloway, Alfred 48                Hill, Nathaniel 16

Gause, Capt. John 42, 47           Hill, William 16

Gause, Daughtry 36                 Hill brothers 17

Gause, Samuel 40                   Hind, Timothy 4

Gause, William 16, 36, 40, 42      Holden, B. 61

Gibbs,        62                   Holden, William 60

Gibbs, Robert 85                   Holmes, John 65, 71, 76

Gilbert, John 48, 49               Holmes, Joseph 69


Holmes, Rebecca 65, 76             Mill Creek 27, 29, 30, 51, 52,

Hood Creek 85, 86, 88              53, 65, 70, 71, 74, 84

Horse Branch 27                    Mill Creek Baptist Church 54,

Horse Pen Branch 27                56, 68, 85

Howe Hill 72                       Mill Path 4

Huggins Creek 20                   Mill Tract, The 72

Indian Creek (Bruns. Co.) 61       Milliken, Moses 43

Indian Creek (I. of Wight Co.)     Mills, James 88

 2                                 Mintz, Ann Peoples 31

Ireland, Andrew 5                  Mintz, Henry 30, 31, 40

Iron Springs, S.C. 81              Mintz, William M. 62

Isle of Wight Co., Va. 2, 3        Mirret, Samuel 5

Ivey, Benjamin 60                  Miry Branch 7

Ivey, Stewart P. 51, 61, 62        Mitchell Swamp 20

James, John 81                     Mohere, John 4, 5

James River, Va. 2                 Montgomery Co., Tenn. 17

James, Wi11is 82                   Montgomery, George 52

Johnston, John 5, 29               Moore, John 2

Jones, Charles 2                   Moore’s Creek 17

Jordan, John D. 82                 Moratuck River 4

King, Duncan 23                    Morgan, John 61, 62

King William Co., Va. 11           Morgan, William 17, 73

Kirby’s Creek 4, 5, 7, 9, 10       Mosquito Creek 71

Lahey, Christopher 5               Motte’s Creek 30

Lawrence, Catherine 87             Mulberry Swamp 62

Leonard, Elizabeth 65, 71, 72,     Mumford, James 4

 76                                Murfreesboro, N.C. 4

Leonard, George 70                 Nelson, John 4

Leonard, Henry 69, 70, 71, 76      New Britton 33, 39, 43, 60, 61,

Leonard, John 65, 69, 70, 71, 72   62, 64

Leonard, Martha 65, 76             New Kent Co., Va. 11

Leonard, Mary 65, 71               9-Mile Post (on Wilmington -

Leonard, Mary Jane 76              Georgetown Rd.) 51, 60

Lewis, Jacob 57                    Northampton Co., N.C. 7

Lillington, Maj. John A. 42        Northrup, Isaac 62

Little, Nathaniel 49               Nottaway River 2, 3, 5

Little Pee Dee River 81, 82        Oates, William T. 34

Livingston Co., Ky. 17, 18         O’Quinn, Daniel 4

Lockwoods Folly Bridge 61, 62      Orton Creek 17

Lockwoods Folly River 46, 48,      Orton Mill Creek 29, 75

 49, 53, 72                        Osborne, Mary 22

Long Bluff, the 31                 Pagan Creek 2

Long Branch 40, 57                 Pagan Point Bay 2

Lunah (female slave) 35            Parker, Francis 5

McClelland, John 34, 43,64         Patty’s Delight 4, 5

McClelland, Sarah 31, 33, 43       Perkins, Martha 31, 32

McClinnon, John 20, 64             Pigott, Elizabeth 50

McKeithen, Moses 60                Pike Co., Ala. 23, 24, 34, 36,

Mahha, John 4                      67, 75, 83, 84

Marsh Branch 73                    Pilent, Richard 7

Maryain, David 70                  Pinch Gut 48, 54, 56, 57, 59,

Mattaponi River 11                 69, 72

Matthew, Malcolm 86                Pine Log Branch 40

Meherrin River 3, 4, 5, 7, 10      Pine Thicket, The 71

Middle Swamp 16, 17, 27, 51, 52,   Pinner,       57

 55, 57, 59, 83


Pinner, Arthur 57                  Russ, David Jr. 60

Pireway 40                         Russ, John B. 60

Poitevent, Capt. John 70, 72       Russ, Thomas 29

Possum Branch 65                   Selfer, Elisha E. 45

Potter, Robert 16                  Seller, Eliz. 2

Powells Swamp 2                    Seller, John 2, 3, 9

Pryer, Humphrey 5                  Seller, Matthew 4

Queens Creek 11                    Seller, William 2, 3, 7, 9

Quince,       73                   SELLERS

Quince, Richard 17                 Abraham 1, 52, 85, 86(2), 87(2),

Rabon,       57                      88

Raboun, Jordan 46, 57              Abram, Jr. 87

Rattlesnake Branch 57              Almon(d) L. 72, 73, 75

Raybourn, John 46                  Alva 80

Reaves, James 62                   Amanda 87

Reedy Swamp 4                      Amelia 14, 25, 38, 77, 79, 81

Register, Sarah 85                 Amos 80, 87

Register, Shadrick 85, 86          Angeline 52

Reynolds, Annis 58                 Anguish 85, 86

Reynolds, Christopher 2            Angus 86, 87

Reynolds, James 52                 Ann 13(2), 15, 18, 32, 49, 50,

Reynolds, Joseph A. 58               52, 55, 71, 76

Reynolds, William 58               Ann J. 69

Richland Branch 15                 Ann M. 88

Ricks, Isaac 4                     Anny 49

Ricks, William 4                   Archabel 17, 18

Roans Branch 57                    Archibald 19

Robbins, Absalom 14, 27, 85, 86,   Arthur 7, 8, 9

 88                                Arthur P. 56

Robbins, Arthur 14(2), 15, 16,     Asbury 41, 62

 26, 27, 52, 55, 64, 65, 74, 75,   Benjamin (of Edgecombe Co.)

 84                                  1, 5, 7, 9, 10, 18, 20, 64, 77,

Robbins, Arthur Jr. 26, 28, 51,      83, 85

 54                                Benjamin (of Horry Co.) 13(2),

Robbins, Arthur Sr. 26, 28, 51       15,16, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 30,

Robbins, Benjamin 14                 31, 38, 42, 64, 77, 79, 81, 82,

Robbins, Daniel 26                   83, 88

Robbins, Jethro 15, 25, 29         Benjamin (of Waccamaw & Shal-­

Robbins, Jonathan 14, 72             lotte) 21, 33, 35, 39, 40, 42,

Robbins, Penelope Sellers 26, 51,    43, 44, 45, 46

 65, 74, 75, 84                    Benjamin Duncan 23

Roberts, Aaron 62                  Benjamin G. 41

Robeson’s (place) 33, 45           Benjamin Jr. 10

Robinson, Samuel 48, 61            Calvin 36

Roger Moore’s Creek 29, 31         Catherine 4, 5, 10

Rooty Branch 60                    Celia 56

Rothwell, A.B. 23                  Charity 56

Rothwell, Jonathan 22, 23          Civil 22

Rothwell, Jonathan H. 23           Cornelius 36

Rothwell, Lydia 23                 Darkis 87

Rothwell, Lydia 21, 23             Davis 87

Royal Oak Branch 46, 48, 49, 53,   Drury 19

 54, 55, 83                        Drusilla 52, 55

Russ,       16, 17                 Edney 82


SELLERS (Cont.)                    SELLERS (Cont.)

Edward 72                          John (of NW Dist.) 86

Edwin L. 86, 87                    John A. 82

Effie 14                           John Bryant 13, 22, 31, 32,

Elisha 10, 13, 15, 16, 20, 21,       34, 35, 40, 42, 44

 29, 31, 32, 33, 38, 40, 42, 45,   John Daniel 58

 47, 49, 50, 64, 76, 83            John F. 39, 60, 61, 62, 63

Elisha (of Columbus Co.) 14, 47,   John M. 86, 88

 77, 78, 79, 80, 81                John W. 52, 53, 54, 56, 57,

Elisha (of Lockwoods Folly) 36,      58, 59

 46, 47, 53, 54, 58                Jordan 13, 21, 22, 38, 77, 79

Elisha (grandson of Elisha) 31     Joseph 67, 75

Elisha H. 36, 48                   Joseph A. 58

Elisha W. 80                       Julian 87

Eliza 52, 54, 58, 87               Letitia 13, 21, 22, 24, 88

Elizabeth 65, 71                   Levin 13, 21, 22, 23

Elizabeth F. 36                    Levin J. 82

Ellen 69                           Lewis 14, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55,

Ethelred (Eldred) 14, 70, 72,        57, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 74,

 73, 74, 75, 76, 84                  75, 76, 87

Everitt 87                         Louisa 36

Faithy 7, 10                       Lucretia 82

Francis 82                         Luke 13, 21, 22, 23, 24

G.W. 80                            Lukey 82

Gamaliel 36                        Luther 36

George 7, 8, 9, 10                 Maria 86, 87, 88

George T. 56                       Margaret 87

Hannah 36                          Martha 56

Hanson Kelly 48, 49, 50            Mary 10, 11, 13(3), 18, 22(3),

Harriet Caroline 36                  23, 26, 31, 32, 35, 36, 87(2),

Henry S. 73                          88

Hosea 36                           Mary (of NW Dist.) 52

Howe 43                            Mary Amanda 50

Hubert 87                          Mary Ann 56

Jacob 11, 24, 87                   Mary Eliza 58

Jacob Marion 21, 24                Mary I. 71

James 14, 15, 20, 27, 45, 52,      Mary Jane 65, 70, 71

 55, 64, 65, 66, 67, 74, 82, 83,   Mary Jr. 71

 84 (2)                            Mary Penelope 14, 16, 27, 64, 83

James B. 56                        Mary Sr. 71

James C. 80                        Matilda 51, 56, 58

James Jr. 14, 64, 65, 75           Matthew 10, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18,

James M. 82                          19, 20, 25, 26, 27, 29, 31, 78,

James W. 65, 67, 71                  83(2)

Jechonias 10, 14, 26, 27, 83, 84   Matthew (of Chowan & Bertie Cos.)

Jemima 87                            4, 7, 9

Joannah 82                         Matthew (of Columbus Co.) 14,

Joel 10, 14, 15, 25, 29, 38, 64,     38, 77, 78

 77, 79, 81, 83                    Matthew (Son of Elisha) 16, 18,

Joel (of Columbus Co.) 14, 25,       31, 33, 45, 60, 62, 65, 83

 77, 78, 79, 80                    Matthew Bacon 13, 17, 18

Joel C. 80, 82                     Matthew Jr. 19, 33, 34, 60

John 2, 5, 9, 13, 18, 19, 34, 39,  Matthew Sr. 34

 45, 50, 51, 57, 60, 61, 63


SELLERS (Cont.)                    SELLERS (Cont.)

 Milleford 38, 78, 79              Willets (of Town Creek) 14,

 Milly 77, 78                        41, 65, 68, 69, 70, 71, 74,

 Moley A. 80                         75, 76

 Nancy 51, 55                      William 3, 8, 9, 13, 25, 31,

 Nathaniel 14, 36, 55, 68, 69,       43, 60, 79

  70, 71, 74, 75                   William (Son of Elisha) 38,

 Nich. 87                            39

 Nicholas 11                       William H. 1, 39, 85, 86, 87,

 Patience E. 82                      88

 Pelman E. 80                      William R. 56

 Penelope (wife of Ethelred) 73    William Riley 50

 Peter L. 57, 69, 71               William W. 20, 21, 22, 80

 Priscilla 87                      Wright 13, 21, 22, 23, 24, 81

 Rebecca 22, 23, 80(3)             Sellers’ Race Ground 11

 Rebecca Jane 36                   Seven Creeks 25, 29, 38, 64,

 Rhoda 13(2), 18, 21, 22, 23       75, 79, 81

 Richard L. 88                     Shallotte Bridge 35, 61, 62

 Robert 52                         Shallotte Creek 31

 Robert L. 71                      Shallotte Inlet 47

 Sabra A. 80                       Shallotte River 31, 45, 61, 62

 Salome 13, 18                     Shallotte Swamp 20, 27, 29

 Sam 31                            Sharer, Robert 4

 Samuel 13(2), 18, 31, 34, 46,     Sherwood, Robert 4

  48, 51(2), 70, 83                Simmins, Benjamin 33, 60

 Samuel (of NW Dist.) 86, 87       Simmons, William 33

 Samuel (Son of Elisha) 35, 42,    Singletary, Mary 31

  51                               16-Mile Post (On Wilmington­

 Samuel J. (Son of Samuel) 36, 51  Georgetown Road) 56, 59

 Samuel J. (of Town Creek) 46, 51, Skipper, John 82

  52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 69   Smith, Ann 30

 Samuel (W.; R.; J. Jr.) 52, 56,   Smith, Elias 30

  57, 59                           Smith, Gen. Benjamin 65, 69

 Sarah 10, 13(3), 22, 32, 34,      Smith, Thomas 48

  36, 51, 85                       Smithfield, Va. 2

 Sarah (wife of Thomas) 46, 53     Snow,       73

 Sarah Jane 56, 58                 Snows Point 30

 Sarah Margaret 36                 Soldiers Bay 65

 Simon 10, 14, 15, 16, 20, 21,     South Quay 3

  27, 29, 30, 31, 64, 75, 83, 84   Southampton Co., Va. 3

 Simon Jr. 14, 30                  Southwest Branch of Waccamaw

 Sion 14, 25, 77, 78, 79, 81,      River 78

  82(2)                            Sowerby, Henry 7

 Susan, 22, 30, 87                 Sparkmen, Levy 29

 Tabitha 86, 88                    Stanaland, Hugh 40

 Thomas 11, 13, 17, 31, 33, 36,    Stanaland, Jacob 40

  40, 41, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 52,  Stanaland, Sarah 35

  53, 54, 55, 58, 59, 60, 62, 65,  Standley, Levi 65

  83                               Starboard Swamp 15, 31, 34, 35,

 Thomas A. 51, 54, 56, 57          40, 42, 43, 45

 Thomas G. 51, 53, 54, 69          Stephens, Archibald 34

 Triscilla 87                      Stephens, Capt. Caleb 42

 Willets (Son of Elisha) 13, 31,   Stevens, Eliza 57

  35, 38, 40, 41, 42, 43, 45, 46,  Stephens, Joseph 57

 49, 62, 70, 76, 83                Strickland, Joseph 5


Sturgeon Creek 55, 61, 67, 73,     Wingate, Jonathan 65

 74, 75, 84                        Wolf Pen Branch 34

Sullivan, Daniel 72                York Place 16, 17

Sullivan, Edward 27, 65, 72, 76

Sullivan, Elizabeth 72, 76

Sullivan, Uriah 61

Swain, Charlotte 58

Swain, Daniel 52, 53, 57, 58

Swain, Hebrietta 52, 58

Swain, John 52, 53, 58

Swain, John Daniel 58

Swain, Judah 16, 61

Swain, Levi 48, 50

Swain, Luke 17

Swain’, Matilda 52, 53

Swain, Robert 36, 48

Swift Creek 10, 15

Tar River 10

Taylor, Benjamin 33

Taylor, William 72

Thomas, John 7

Thompson, Sarah 40

Town Creek 27, 29, 75

Town Creek Bridge 69, 72

Turner, Henry 4

Turrentine, Morgan C. 23

Vick, Richard 3

Waccamaw Co., S.C. 20

Waccamaw River 20, 29, 31, 33,

 40, 45, 64, 65, 75, 77, 83

Waddell, F.N. 88

Ward, John 33, 45, 60, 65

Ward, John Jr. 34

Wards Ferry 60, 65

Ware, Penelope J. 56

Warren Co., Tenn. 17

Washington, Richard 4

Watters, Joseph 85

West, William 2

Westcott, Thomas 43

Wet Ash Swamp 33, 34, 43, 45,

 60, 62

Whatcoat, Bishop Richard 20

White, James 29

White, John H. 35

White Marsh 15, 20, 27, 29, 38,

 64, 78

Whitehead, John 11

Wildcat Swamp 7

Willets, Mary 13, 32, 76

Willets Mill Creek 48

Williams Branch 61, 62

Williams, Z.D. 56

Willis Swamp 33

Wingate, Edward 65