TAZEWELL CO, IL (made in
lays next to

1860 TAZEWELL CO, IL
JACOB SELLER, PAGE 62 FREMONT/ Tremont?=
Jacob Seller 34 Germany
Mary Seller 38 Germany
Jacob Seller 5 Germany
Louisa Seller 4 Germany
Joel Seller 3 Germany

I J Seller 25 KY
Catharine Seller 19 PA
James W Seller 2 IL

WILLIAM HENRY BATES = October, 1864, found the subject of this sketch an employe on “The Tazewell County Republican,” edited by William W. Sellers. In 1868 the job and book firm of Sellers & Bates was organized and continued until 1870,

1870
Wm W Sellers 36 pa, Pekin, Tazewell, Illinois(ckFultonPa,msh)
Eliza Sellers 32 pa
Blanch Sellers 12 pa
Nellie Sellers 9 pa
Willie Sellers 5 il
Minnie Sellers 3
Lucinda Narish 19 pa
Ellen Smith 68 scotland

1880
Eliza Sellers 43 pa, wd, dad pa, postmistress
Blanch Sellers 22 pa, dau, single
Willie Sellers 14 il, son = ca 1866
Minnie Sellers 12 pa
Agnas Maltes 20 , single

1900

1910
William Sellers Pekin Ward 6, Tazewell, IL abt 1865 Illinois Boarder , BOTH PARENTS PA, US IND REN? ,m9yrs,living in boarding house
Louise Sellers Pekin Ward 6, Tazewell, IL abt 1879 Illinois Boarder , m 9yrs, in boarding house

1920
Homer Sellers Eunice Cincinnati, Tazewell, Illinois abt 1893 Illinois White Head
Eunice Sellers Homer Cincinnati, Tazewell, Illinois abt 1893 Illinois White Wife
Robert Lee Sellers Homer, Eunice Cincinnati, Tazewell, Illinois abt 1919 Illinois White Son

Clyde C Sellers Effie Cincinnati, Tazewell, Illinois abt 1890 Illinois White Head (ck Perry)
Effie Sellers Clyde C Cincinnati, Tazewell, Illinois abt 1891 Illinois White Wife
Ross Sellers Clyde C, Effie Cincinnati, Tazewell, Illinois abt 1915 Illinois White Son
Glenn Sellers Clyde C, Effie Cincinnati, Tazewell, Illinois abt 1917 Illinois White Son

Rosa Sellers Ada Hittle, Tazewell, Illinois abt 1872 Illinois White Head
Ada Sellers Rosa Hittle, Tazewell, Illinois abt 1893 Missouri White Wife
Elizabeth Sellers Rosa, Ada Hittle, Tazewell, Illinois abt 1914 Illinois White Daughter

William Sellers Lulu Pekin Precinct 7, Tazewell, Illinois abt 1869 Illinois White Head
Lulu Sellers William Pekin Precinct 7, Tazewell, Illinois abt 1879 Illinois White Wife
Welker Sellers William, Lulu Pekin Precinct 7, Tazewell, Illinois abt 1914 Illinois White Son
Albert Sellers William, Lulu Pekin Precinct 7, Tazewell, Illinois abt 1915 Illinois White Son

1930
Homer L Sellers Eunice L South Pekin, Tazewell, IL abt 1893 Illinois Head
Eunice L Sellers Homer L South Pekin, Tazewell, IL abt 1893 Wife
Robert Lee Sellers Homer L, Eunice L South Pekin, Tazewell, IL abt 1920 Son
Nera Jane Sellers Homer L, Eunice L South Pekin, Tazewell, IL abt 1927 Daughter

Clyde C Sellers Belle South Pekin, Tazewell, IL abt 1889 Illinois Head
Ross Clyde Sellers Clyde C South Pekin, Tazewell, IL abt 1916 Son
Glen R Sellers Clyde C South Pekin, Tazewell, IL abt 1917 Son
Belle Sellers South Pekin, Tazewell, IL abt 1863 Mother

Ross R Sellers Ada A Hittle, Tazewell, IL abt 1891 Illinois Head Ada A Sellers Ross R Hittle, Tazewell, IL abt 1892 Wife M Elizabeth Sellers Ross R, Ada A Hittle, Tazewell, IL abt 1913 Daughter
Leon Sellers Sarah Pekin, Tazewell, IL abt 1895 Iowa Head Sarah Sellers Leon Pekin, Tazewell, IL abt 1897 Wife
William W Sellers Lulu M Pekin, Tazewell, IL abt 1868 Illinois Head Lulu M Sellers William W Pekin, Tazewell, IL abt 1879 Wife William W Sellers William W, Lulu M Pekin, Tazewell, IL abt 1914 Son Albert A Sellers William W, Lulu M Pekin, Tazewell, IL abt 1916 Son

=

from DENNIS
Dennis Haun <fdhaun@comcast.net>

Marie... This Wm. Sellers isn't from my Green County Pennsylvania tribe, but this information about his early life might help out some of our other Pennsylvania Sellers . Dennis H. Peoria, Illinois http://www.pjstar.com/blogs/checkitout/x1225428848/From-the-Pekin-Public-Librarys-History-Room-William-W-Sellers-Publisher-and-Politician =

From the Pekin Public Library's History Room: William W. Sellers, Publisher and Politician

By Emily Lambe

The foundation of Pekin’s historical record was laid in 1870, with the publication of the Sellers & Bates Pekin City Directory. As noted more than once in this column, included in that directory was a “History of Pekin, from its earliest settlement to the present time.”

The 1870 directory billed itself as “the first history and directory of the city.” The conjunction “and” is important — it was not the first city directory, but it does contain the first published history of Pekin. If not for the Sellers & Bates directory, our knowledge of Pekin’s early history would be greatly impoverished.

But just who were “Sellers & Bates, Printers,” to whom researchers into our local history owe such a great debt? We answered the “Bates” part of that question earlier this year, in the March 17 Pekin Daily Times, in the column, “William H. Bates of Pekin, ‘the historian of the city.’”

Bates was the younger half of the printing and publishing partnership of Sellers & Bates. Sellers was William W. Sellers of Pekin, a newspaper publisher and politician (there was no clear line separating the two roles in those days) who enjoyed a fair degree of local prominence.

Sellers briefly appears in Charles C. Chapman’s 1879 “History of Tazewell County,” p.723, in Chapman’s account of Tazewell County’s early newspapers. One of them was the Tazewell County Republican, of which Chapman writes, “. . . Wm. W. Sellers got a hold of it, in 1863 or ’64. He made it a red-hot Republican organ and one of the best papers published in the Northwest. He was a shrewd able writer and could turn the English language into a two-edge sword when in a wordy conflict with an opponent. He conducted it until his death, which occurred Dec. 15, 1872. It was then conducted by his administrators for a short time, when Jacob R. Riblett and Wm. H. Bates purchased it.”

The reference to Sellers’ death in 1872 explains why Sellers’ name dropped from the title of subsequent editions of the Pekin City Directory. The business partnership of Sellers & Bates was ended by Sellers’ untimely death, after which Bates continued to publish the directories alone.

The “Atlas Map of Tazewell County, Illinois” was published about 1873. The atlas includes several lengthy biographies of the “Old Settlers of Tazewell County,” all of them laden with fulsome praise of their subjects. On page 43 is a biography of Sellers that reads more like a funeral eulogy than a proper biography, but which nevertheless records all of the highlights of his life.

Sellers, the biography says, “was born May 19, 1833, in Mercersburg, Franklin county, Pennsylvania. He was the youngest of a family of six children of Michael and Phoebe (Walker) Sellers. He is descended from one of the old and prominent families of eastern Pennsylvania. His early culture was received in the schools of his native town. His rare and eminent natural qualities, coupled with his active and studious mind, led him on to that success which, as a public man and journalist, he acquired in his after career.”

Sellers went into journalism in the early 1850s as assistant editor of the Chambersburg Repository, but at age 22 he moved to McConnellsville, Pa., and became the owner and publisher of the Fulton Republican. “He was married July 8, 1856, in Indianola, Iowa, to Miss Lide Smith, with whom he first became acquainted in his native town.” They had five children. After their marriage, they returned to McConnellsville, where Sellers continued to publish the Fulton Republican. He also was elected to the Pennsylvania legislature.

Sellers settled in Pekin in Nov. 1863 and soon after purchased the Tazewell County Republican. “The county was largely democratic at this time, but owing to the herculean labors of this gifted journalist, we may largely account for the political revolution of 1872, when we find, for the first time in its political record, that the county was republican,” his biography says.

Sellers was elected mayor of Pekin in 1865, but he resigned in the fall of 1866 after winning election as a representative in the Illinois General Assembly. Besides the elective offices he held, the biography states that Sellers also “was appointed, by President Grant, postmaster of the city of Pekin, which position he held until his death, which occurred at his residence on the 15th of December, 1872. His amiable and accomplished wife is still continuing the paper which was so ably conducted by her husband.”

Somewhat remarkably for that era, after Sellers’ death, President Grant appointed Sellers’ widow as “postmistress of Pekin.” “The appointment meets the approbation of the citizens of Pekin, and it is well conducted through her management,” the biography says.

In tribute to Sellers’ journalism, his biography comments, “It is a well-established fact in the minds of our intelligent citizens, that the press is the most potent agency for good or evil in Christendom. The same is true in state or municipal affairs. Every city owes its progress, in a great measure, to its press. Newspapers are now becoming the vehicle of thought, as well as the means of heralding the virtues of every people and the beauties of every locality to the world. In respect to these facts, Pekin was indeed benefited by the short but incessant labors of William W. Sellers.”