STEWART CO, GA
In 1825, a portion of the territory ceded to the United States by the Treaty of Indian Springs, made in February 1825, between the United States and the Creek Indians, was made into Lee County. Three years later, in 1828, the County of Randolph was made from part of Lee County and had Lumpkin as its county seat.

On December 23, 1830, Stewart County was formed from a portion of the Randolph territory which included Districts 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, and portions of 31, 32 and 33. This included the city of Lumpkin which became the Stewart County seat. Later, portions of Stewart County went to form parts of Webster County, Quitman County, Marion County and Chattahoochee County.


MARRIAGES =

1830


1840 STEWART CO, GA
JACOB SELLERS, PAGE 147, Florence Dist, STEWART CO =20100100010002001=
MALE 70/80 = 1760/1770
MALE 30/40 = 1800/1810
MALE 10/15 =1825/30
MALE U 5 =1835/40
MALE U 5 = 1835/40
FEMALE 15/20 = 1820/25
FEMALE U 5 = 1835/40
FEMALE U 5 = 1835/40
next
M. C. HAY
JOHN HUSLEY?

ASA JOINER = WHO is he =




1850 STEWART CO, GA
ABRAHAM CEYERS, PAGE 109, 19TH DIST
JAMES SALTER, PAGE 127 MINERAL SPRINGS
RICHARD SALTER, PAGE 132 FLORENCE
THOMAS SALTER, PAGE 127 MINERAL SPRINGS

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from FredandMaryFran Powell <fredandmaryfran@gmail.com>

GEORGIA TROOPS

17th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Company E, George W. SELLERS

17th Infantry Regiment was organized in Stewart County, Georgia, during the summer of 1861. Its members were from Columbus and Decatur, and the counties of Webster, Schley, Harris, and Stewart. Ordered to Virginia the regiment was assigned to General Toombs' and later Benning's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. It served with the army from the Seven Days' Battles to Cold Harbor, except when it was on detached duty with Longstreet at Suffolk, Chickamauga, and Knoxville. The 17th was active in the Petersburg trenches north of the James River and around Appomattox. In April, 1862, it totalled
398 men, had 5 killed and 30 wounded at Malvern Hill, and lost fifty-one percent of the 200 engaged at Second Manassas. Of the 350 who saw action at Gettysburg, twenty-nine percent were disabled, and from April 14 to May 6, there were 86 casualties, then from August 1 to December 31, 1864, the unit had 45 killed or wounded. It surrendered with 18 officers and 168 men. The field officers were Colonels Henry L. Benning and Wesley C. Hodges; Lieutenant Colonels William A. Barden and Charles W. Matthews, and Majors James B. Moore, John H. Pickett, and Thomas Walker.